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(04-20-2011, 10:34 AM)Kopp Wrote: [ -> ]My oldest son will be starting Christendom College in the fall. We have no reservations whatsoever. It was the only Catholic college he (and we) seriously considered.


Kopp, would you share with us about your sons experience at the College? How does he like it? What about the area?

If we are comparing Catholic areas, I wonder if Front Royal would be in the number #1 slot, followed by Lincoln & maybe the Kansas area? What do you think? How would you rate the different Catholic areas & schools? There is a Catholic College in the midwest also, right?
What are the top 5 or 6 Catholic areas in the country? Thank you.
(11-19-2013, 10:01 PM)DeoGratias72 Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-20-2011, 10:34 AM)Kopp Wrote: [ -> ]My oldest son will be starting Christendom College in the fall. We have no reservations whatsoever. It was the only Catholic college he (and we) seriously considered.


Kopp, would you share with us about your sons experience at the College? How does he like it? What about the area?

If we are comparing Catholic areas, I wonder if Front Royal would be in the number #1 slot, followed by Lincoln & maybe the Kansas area? What do you think? How would you rate the different Catholic areas & schools? There is a Catholic College in the midwest also, right?
What are the top 5 or 6 Catholic areas in the country? Thank you.


I would also be grateful to hear about this ... as well as from anyone who knows Christendom College or the Front Royal community from first hand experience. What is it like?
More links as I surf the Web this morning.  :)

As I brought up in a previous post:
(11-19-2013, 11:40 AM)Jacob Wrote: [ -> ]The point about the liturgy [in the comment I quoted] is interesting.  The Triumph people were loyal in a time of great rebellion, so they naturally went with the NO, though with reservations and sadness.  By the time the magazine and the society running it fell apart in 1975, the strain over the liturgical abuses apparent must have been intolerable.  According to Triumph's Wikipedia article, Archbishop Lefebvre contributed.  I wonder when and how often he did so.

I was reading some more this morning when i ran across a couple of things.

1. From The Remnant"Save The Tridentine Mass", December 31. 1969
This article by Walter Matt notes that the Triumph people were well aware of the liturgical situation.  (And a side note of interest is the fact it mentions a two-year postponement of the introduction of the Novus Ordo, which must have been ignored since the NO came out less than a year after the article.)

2. This post at the website of the Society of St. Hugh of Cluny, a post-SP group in Connecticut:  "Catholic Traditionalism in the United States: Notes for a History – Part I" by Stuart Chessman.

Mr. Chessman makes an astute observation:
Quote:Not all of their judgments, however, were equally sound. Triumph celebrated the publication of Humanae Vitae as a glorious turning point for the Church, as the vindication of papal authority after the post- Conciliar chaos. Now, said the editors, it was time to rally around Pope Paul and join the counterattack that he had commenced. In this they were grievously mistaken. They had declared the war over when the struggle had just begun – as the liturgical revolution took off, as the transformation of the “American Catholic Church” from  passive conformism  to active progressivism gained momentum with the knowledge and at the direction of the Vatican.  Triumph’s newfound uncritical enthusiasm for the Vatican stood in all too obvious conflict with the facts recorded in its own pages. I  have always believed that this inherent contradiction – just as much as  the health problems of its editor-in-chief – led to the publication’s untimely demise in 1974.
Jacob, I am really happy and grateful for all you are bringing to my attention here. Many thanks indeed.

Can only manage some quick comments here.


(11-20-2013, 11:16 AM)Jacob Wrote: [ -> ]More links as I surf the Web this morning.  :)

As I brought up in a previous post:

The point about the liturgy [in the comment I quoted] is interesting.  The Triumph people were loyal in a time of great rebellion, so they naturally went with the NO, though with reservations and sadness.  By the time the magazine and the society running it fell apart in 1975, the strain over the liturgical abuses apparent must have been intolerable.  According to Triumph's Wikipedia article, Archbishop Lefebvre contributed.  I wonder when and how often he did so.


I was reading some more this morning when i ran across a couple of things.

1. From The Remnant"Save The Tridentine Mass", December 31. 1969
This article by Walter Matt notes that the Triumph people were well aware of the liturgical situation.  (And a side note of interest is the fact it mentions a two-year postponement of the introduction of the Novus Ordo, which must have been ignored since the NO came out less than a year after the article.)

2. This post at the website of the Society of St. Hugh of Cluny, a post-SP group in Connecticut:  "Catholic Traditionalism in the United States: Notes for a History – Part I" by Stuart Chessman.

Mr. Chessman makes an astute observation:
Not all of their judgments, however, were equally sound. Triumph celebrated the publication of Humanae Vitae as a glorious turning point for the Church, as the vindication of papal authority after the post- Conciliar chaos. Now, said the editors, it was time to rally around Pope Paul and join the counterattack that he had commenced. In this they were grievously mistaken. They had declared the war over when the struggle had just begun – as the liturgical revolution took off, as the transformation of the “American Catholic Church” from  passive conformism  to active progressivism gained momentum with the knowledge and at the direction of the Vatican.  Triumph’s newfound uncritical enthusiasm for the Vatican stood in all too obvious conflict with the facts recorded in its own pages. I  have always believed that this inherent contradiction – just as much as  the health problems of its editor-in-chief – led to the publication’s untimely demise in 1974.


"The Triumph people were well aware of the liturgical situation" ... Indeed, how could they not be! Especially given how astute they were.

All this relates to my silly title for this thread: Crypto-Trads.

Here were people who were incredibly traditional and yet in some ways you would not know it. For they clearly refused the path of Archbishop Lefebvre of disobedience. If there was any rebellion, it seems to have been hidden. And I wonder if it is the same with Christendom College even today.

I suspect there is a parallel with the Institute of Christ the King who seem to me extraordinarily loyal to the Holy See and silent with criticism as Triumph was.

The ICKSP owe a great deal to the great Cardinal Siri. I have heard a story, perhaps apocryphal, but interesting. According to that story Cardinal Siri obviously understood all that wounded ABL's heart - but he begged him not to disobey.

I see then two lines of traditionalism, one exemplified by Cardinal Siri, Triumph, ICKSP - and I imagine Christendom College today.

The other line is obviously the SSPX and the sedevacantists

A lot to think about there, I think ...

More to say to your other points, Jacob, when I get time ...

(11-20-2013, 06:54 AM)Roger Buck Wrote: [ -> ]
(11-19-2013, 10:01 PM)DeoGratias72 Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-20-2011, 10:34 AM)Kopp Wrote: [ -> ]My oldest son will be starting Christendom College in the fall. We have no reservations whatsoever. It was the only Catholic college he (and we) seriously considered.


Kopp, would you share with us about your sons experience at the College? How does he like it? What about the area?

If we are comparing Catholic areas, I wonder if Front Royal would be in the number #1 slot, followed by Lincoln & maybe the Kansas area? What do you think? How would you rate the different Catholic areas & schools? There is a Catholic College in the midwest also, right?
What are the top 5 or 6 Catholic areas in the country? Thank you.


I would also be grateful to hear about this ... as well as from anyone who knows Christendom College or the Front Royal community from first hand experience. What is it like?

I hope KOPP comes back & gives us an update.
Dr Carroll once said that the main reason Triumph failed was their refusal to accept spiritual guidance. They would hire a chaplain and keep him around only until he said something they didn't want to hear.

C.
(11-20-2013, 08:48 PM)Cetil Wrote: [ -> ]Dr Carroll once said that the main reason Triumph failed was their refusal to accept spiritual guidance. They would hire a chaplain and keep him around only until he said something they didn't want to hear.

C.

This is interesting!  In Bozell's book Mision Guadalupe, he talks about the magazine in the opening chapter and how his life up to the writing of the book had been a lesson in charity and humility and decreasing so that Christ may increase.  He mentions that this included (though he was not keen on admitting it) the failure of the magazine.  I wish I had the book in front of me so I could copy out the passage.
(11-19-2013, 11:40 AM)Jacob Wrote: [ -> ]This is a review of the Popowski book that is based on his research done for the dissertation/PDF.

I want to throw out one of the comments at the bottom for discussion:
Quote:Very interesting article, thank you! And to think somebody actually remembers Triumph Magazine. I attended one of their summer sessions at El Escorial outside of Madrid. I too was fascinated by the ‘crazy’ and entertaining rapid-fire Prof Wilhelm.

One of Triumph’s [still living] contributors take on Triumph’s failure was that they got ‘soft’ on the modernist influences in the Church, including the changes in the Liturgy. Also, after much research into the beginnings of America, this contributor discovered the irreconcilable ethos of the founders with the Catholic Church, including a surprising link with Freemasons in the Irish American Church hierarchy. There suddenly existed a split of monarchists and supporters of modern government at Triumph.

Triumph Magazine started as a bastion for Catholic American intellectuals. When this basis watered down, so did the contributors, the funds, and the interest – Triumph then stood for nothing.

At our present point in time, it is easy to become convinced that no real intellectuals exist in America, or anyone who knows the non-modernist Catholic Faith. How can anyone ever find them now?

I'm sure Bozell and Wilhelmsen fell in the camp of the monarchists.  I wonder where Carroll and those who went on to help him found Christendom fell.

The point about the liturgy is interesting.  The Triumph people were loyal in a time of great rebellion, so they naturally went with the NO, though with reservations and sadness.  By the time the magazine and the society running it fell apart in 1975, the strain over the liturgical abuses apparent must have been intolerable.  According to Triumph's Wikipedia article, Archbishop Lefebvre contributed.  I wonder when and how often he did so.


It's only an educated guess, but I can imagine this still living contributor is Gary Potter. Potter has clearly done a lot of thinking about American history - there is an archive of his articles here: http://catholicism.org/author/garypotter


Moreover, Potter writes a warm article about Triumph published in a Distributist anthology Beyond Capitalism and Socialism, in which he mentions Bozell firing him from Triumph - three times!

As for Lefebrve ... Mr Kittens has done an enormous amount of reading into this story. What he does with his research is obviously twisted ... but in IMHO there is a lot of factual material there.

This is from Who is Snuffing Your Neighbour's Kittens

Quote:Already in the January 1968 issue of Triumph an article was published entitled, "The Case of Authority" by Marcel Lefebvre.


Yes an ENORMOUS amount is in that article - buried, twisted, perverted. I remain very interested in why LaRouche's organization would bother themselves SO MUCH about Christendom College ...

Link s here again https://www.larouchepub.com/other/2002/2...kttns.html




Roger, thanks for the link to Gary Potter's articles, I will definitely read through those!.  And thanks for pointing out the reference to Archbishop Lefebvre.  I've only glanced through the LaRouche article before.

By the way, I found this yesterday during my surfing around and thought you would find it interesting since it deals with the larger question of heirs:

"A True Catholic Rendezvous:  A Personal Reminiscence of the Late +William C. Koneazny, R.I.P."
by Thomas A. Droleskey

Starting at the sixth paragraph is a brief history of the Catholic Rendezvous held in the northeast of the US for many years in the 70s and 80s.

So far I have hesitated to cite very much from Mr Kittens' long, complex article about the so-called "fascists" at Christendom College. It is nasty indeed and could offend people.

I am also aware of many people thinking: what's the point of this? As HimAgain wrote long ago:

(04-14-2011, 07:26 AM)Himagain Wrote: [ -> ]First, I am astounded that a LaRouchie article would be quoted for any reason on a trad Catholic forum, except for a good laugh. 
I think we gain similar insight into Trad (or any other kind of actual) Catholicism at rense.com, and the laughs are about as good there. 

Also, I was surprised that the article received such a polite response here at FE. 
Perhaps many readers just considered it too far out to merit a response, and I'm just being so indiscreet as to draw attention to what should be ignored. 
But hey, funny is funny, and Larouchies finding a fascist, anti-JPII conspiracy at Seton/Christendom is hilarious for anyone in the know. 


For me, this can't simply explained by insanity - even while I agree the article IS insane ...

It is very hard for me to explain, but I have this read this article several times over the years and and am haunted by it. In addition to sheer lunacy, the article does I believe contain a lot of systematic research, closely reading old book journals published by Christendom, looking for things to smear them with. The sheer extent of it is extraordinary. Why would anyone go to this length unless they were upset/scared by Christendom, Seton etc?

As I say the article is long and complex, nasty and nauseating. But I want to pull a few "highlights" from it, with some additional comments from myself. This will give people both a kind of simply entry/or (admittedly very, very poor) Cliff's notes into it ... and I hope it may lead to further illuminating comment.

Personally, I am very grateful for the illuminating comments in this thread from Cetil, Jacob and numerous others.

So, "highlights" - you may want to be prepared to be a bit sick ... I'm also adding some bold.

From Who is Snuffing Your Neighbour's Kittens?

Quote:In the course of the last several months, a team of EIR reporters has been conducting an intensive national-security investigation into what has been shown to be a longstanding intelligence operation targetting the political association of Lyndon LaRouche. This investigation ... has uncovered a large chunk of the evidence exposing a fascist, anti-Semitic, anti-American network, which has been operating under the cover of the Catholic Church in the Arlington Diocese of Northern Virginia. This network is centered in Christendom College in Front Royal, St. Catherine of Siena parish in Great Falls, and an associated movement of private, nominally Catholic schools.

Comment: Mr Kittens - as I shall call the author regularly calls any form of traditional Catholicism "nominal". It is not the real form of ecumenical Catholicism of Vatican II, according to Mr Kittens.


From Who is Snuffing Your Neighbour's Kittens?
Quote:This network's operations are aimed not only against Lyndon LaRouche; they are, for similar motives, conducted against the ecumenical mission of Pope John Paul II, and also an important threat to the security of the U.S.A.

...

this network, aimed at the throat of the Washington, D.C. Federal bureaucracy, remains an integral part of a major threat to the system of constitutional government of the United States .... As this report will show, this same network not only includes a nasty nest of pro-fascist, nominally Catholic philosophical gnostics; but, we will emphasize, that nest is only one integral part of a much broader collection of kindred sorts of both nominally Protestant, and also nominally what-not theological and political perversities.


Comment: "Nominally Protestant" ... the article will go on to claim something like a grand coalition of conspiracy, including everything from Christendom College Catholics, Opus Dei, Confederates of the deep South, conservative Protestants and the good Lord only knows what else ... Bigfoot and the Loch Ness monster, maybe :)


From Who is Snuffing Your Neighbour's Kittens?
Quote:This universal-fascist penetration of Catholic and other circles inside the U.S.A., as typified by the relevant associates of Christendom College, is a reflection of an ideological axis, the current Brzezinski-Huntington drive for a global "Clash of Civilizations" war. The fact that Catholic elements of this gnostic utopian network are not only situated within the Dulles family legacy's Washington, D.C. "Beltway," but are being used for deep penetration of the highest levels of Federal government institutions, puts this problem in a high-ranking position among the obvious, current internal national-security threats to our nation ....

Our presently ongoing investigation has shown that this operation's penetration of nominally Catholic networks in North America, centers historically on the Carlist network of William F. Buckley, Jr.'s brother-in-law, L. Brent Bozell. The role of the Buckley family intersects the international influence of avowedly fascist, pro-Carlist circles among British converts to Catholicism, such as the notorious cases of avowedly pro-fascist G.K. Chesterton and Hilaire Belloc (see box on "Distributism").

Bozell formed the Society for the Christian Commonwealth (SCC) in Warrenton, Va. and published Triumph magazine from 1966 until 1976, at which time his long-simmering insanity resulted in the publication's demise.

As you will see, this network, although nominally Catholic, is closely tied to the most wild-eyed right-wing, fundamentalist Protestants, such as Jerry Falwell and Pat Robertson, to William Yandell Elliott's Nashville Agrarians, to the pro-Mussolini "distributist" circles of G.K. Chesterton and Hilaire Belloc; and is thoroughly committed to the Mont Pelerin Society, Heritage Foundation, and American Enterprise Institute, with their adoption of Adam Smith's gnostic "free trade" as, implicitly, an article of religious faith. 


From Who is Snuffing Your Neighbour's Kittens?
Quote:To understand Christendom College today, we must trace its fascist roots through examining the cases of Bozell's and Buckley's Society for the Christian Commonwealth (SCC), and Triumph magazine.

What is currently known about the origin of this fascist movement is that in the aftermath of Vatican II, and in large part in opposition to the reforms implemented in that council, L. Brent Bozell created the SCC, which began publishing Triumph in 1966.

Among the leading individuals associated with this movement was Dr. Frederick Wilhelmsen of the University of Dallas. Wilhelmsen was an adviser and contributor to neo-Confederate Southern Partisan (see box) until his death in 1996; he was also knighted in 1975, by Prince Javier de Borbón Parma, for having smuggled the exiled Carlist pretender to the Spanish throne back into Spain from France. He was Christendom College founder Warren Carroll's mentor and was described as the "Don of philosophy and political science at the University of Dallas." He was particularly close to the shy Pretender to the Austro-Hungarian Empire, Otto von Hapsburg, who was listed as a contributor to Triumph from the beginning.

From at least 1970-73, the SCC sponsored two-month-long seminars in Madrid, Spain during July and August at El Escorial, the palace of King Philip II (1556-98). These seminars, which were also attended by Wilhelmsen's daughter Alexandra and by Warren H. Carroll and his wife, Anne Westhoff Carroll, were advertised in Triumph as follows: "The theological and philosophical roots of Western Christendom. With special emphasis on Spanish history—the Reconquest, the Escorial and Trent, the Crusade against Communism in 1936-39...."

Comment: I think this is mostly factual ... and VERY interesting to me. If anyone can say more as to Wilhelmsen's connection to Otto von Habsburg especially, I would be interested.

The article then goes into further lunacy by suggesting all this is tied to the Kennedy Assassination. Here is the first of a number of references to it:

From Who is Snuffing Your Neighbour's Kittens?
Quote:From the standpoint of the current attempted coup d'état beginning Sept. 11, it should be noted that Warren H. Carroll, who worked briefly for the CIA in 1959-60, was part of the milieu of the Kennedy assassination prior to the creation of the SCC.

In 1963, Carroll was a script writer for a Dallas-based radio show called "Lifeline," funded by H.L. Hunt, and a member of Conservatives U.S.A. (CUSA). The head of CUSA in Dallas at the time was Robert Morris, who was formerly chief counsel for Sen. Joe McCarthy, thus working side-by-side with Roy Cohn. By 1963, Morris was President of the University of Dallas. CUSA took out the famous ad in a Dallas newspaper the day Kennedy was shot, which read: "Kennedy, Wanted for Treason," with a black obituary border. Days later, a script written by Carroll on "Heroism" was found, according to the Warren Commission Report, in the car of Jack Ruby the day he killed Oswald.


From Who is Snuffing Your Neighbour's Kittens?
Quote:Many years later, when King Juan Carlos of Spain failed to veto a law legalizing abortion in Spain, Wilhelmsen wrote an article in the Winter 1990 issue of Faith and Reason, published by Christendom Press, entitled, "The Dilemma of the Spanish Right: The Case of Abortion," in which he proposed that the King carry out a military coup against the constitution: "If Juan Carlos had defied the government and the constitution by calling in the Armed Forces to back him, what would have happened? ... Don Juan Carlos would have appeared before the entire Christian world as a Catholic king and knight whose sword was at the service of the unborn."

Comment: I can imagine this bit is true ... and is again an example of the very close attention Mr Kittens is paying to old article from Christendom.

Then the article goes onto the Seton programme - and Sedevacantism is brought in ...


From Who is Snuffing Your Neighbour's Kittens?
Quote:But the creation of Christendom College was only one part of an expanding movement to take over the Catholic Church in Northern Virginia and beyond, modelled on the methods of the fascist Carlist movement in 1930s Spain. Warren Carroll's wife, Anne Westhoff Carroll, has been a kind of cult-figure for this school movement.

Anne Carroll is a Carlist ideologue in her own right. In fact she worked for Triumph magazine beginning in 1970, before Warren Carroll joined her at the magazine in 1973. She was raised as a Catholic, whereas he has described himself as having been a Deist before his conversion. They met in 1962 and married in 1968, at which point he converted to Catholicism. She, like most fascists, is an intellectual light-weight, but is by no means an insignificant also-ran in these gnostic circles.

In March 1973, Anne Carroll wrote an article in Triumph, which laid out her perspective for the creation of what she called private Catholic "Apostolic Schools." In this aricle, she wrote that the school community should see itself "just as does the community of contemplative nuns or the regiment of soldiers or the artisans' guild in a Christian society....

"They will learn the almost unknown stories of the great Catholic heroes (ask any Catholic child—including those attending parochial school—if he knows of Red Hugh O'Donnell or Don Juan of Austria)." The latter reputedly won the Battle of Lepanto against the Turks in 1571, which the Carlist cults' revisionist theory of history regards as the most important event in the modern history of the human species.

...

This early experiment was to become the pilot project for the creation of an expanding number of "Catholic" elementary and high schools in Northern Virginia, including Seton High School in Manassas, Annunciation Academy in Reston, and St. John Bosco in Leesburg.

Although Seton High School has been in existence for some time, Annunciation received its impetus only in March 1994, when a member of a schism from the Catholic Church, Gerry Matatics, was invited to speak at St. Catherine of Siena on the topic of creating private "Catholic" schools. St. John Bosco High School was a later extension of Annunciation.

According to eyewitness reports of an active participant, after Matatics' March 1994 speech, a number of "moms" at St. Catherine's decided to create a private elementary school, initially in Vienna, Virginia and now in Reston, called Annunciation Academy. ...

After only a year or so of operation, there was a parents' revolt against Terreri. In stepped Anne Carroll, as member of a new board of directors established to quell the parental revolt. Through January 2002, a number of changes were made at Annunciation Academy, consolidating the control over the school by the Carrolls. Warren Carroll joined the board and another Christendom College figure, J. Laurence McCarty, became its chairman. Also appointed was Joseph Sobran.

Both Joseph Sobran and Anne Carroll are associated with an organization called the Christian-Islamic Forum, located in Burke, Virginia.

Comment: And now here comes Opus Dei ...

From Who is Snuffing Your Neighbour's Kittens?
Quote:As we have seen, the entire private "Catholic" school movement was initiated by parishioners at St. Catherine and is under the control and direction of Christendom College-centered former members of the Society of the Christian Commonwealth, and is the realization of the original Triumph magazine Carlist guild perspective.

This operation has been flanked by a number of key priests centered at St. Catherine of Siena; St. Lawrence Church in Franconia, Virginia, St. Agnes in Arlington and Our Lady of Hope in Potomac Falls, Virginia. The current pastor at St. Catherine is Rev. Franklyn McAfee, who previously was at St. Lawrence the Martyr along with Reverend Most. McAfee is a member of Opus Dei, the same organization which also claims Robert Hanssen and his wife as members. McAfee was also the president of Notre Dame Institute of Catechetics. Father Most, who died in 1999, was also a member of the faculty of the Notre Dame Institute beginning in the late 1980s and taught theology at Anne Carroll's Seton High School. Christendom College press publishes three of his books ...

The other connection between Hanssen and the Christendom College crowd is a network which penetrates Opus Dei. As reported above, Reverend McAfee is a publicly declared member of Opus Dei, as is Hanssen. One of Hanssen's daughters, Susan Hanssen, is at the University of Dallas, where she lives at the Opus Dei residence. She spent the year 2000 in the United Kingdom studying G.K. Chesterton. Frederick Wilhelmsen taught for four years at the University of Navarra in Pamplona, Spain, which is an Opus Dei university. Alexandra Wilhelmsen received her PhD from this same Opus Dei university.

Comment: My comments are pretty much finished for now. I am just going to paste in some more very lengthy, very weird material ...

I will simply add some bold, particularly to the confederacy stuff which is another part of Mr Kitten's vast grand conspiracy coalition...


From Who is Snuffing Your Neighbour's Kittens?
Quote:The fact that the Christendom-based little schools/home-schooling octopus is spreading fascist indoctrination into those programs is exposed by reference to another book in the series, Anne Carroll's Christ and the Americas. This book is used at the Seton School and is indicative of the anti-American, Carlist propaganda, which any school associated with the Carrolls' circle employs, whether or not this particular book is employed explicitly within the classroom.

Christ and the Americas defends Spain against all criticism by a transparent sophistry which could deceive only an illiterate. Anne Carroll defends Spain against all unpleasant evidence concerning its bloody history during the 16th and early 17th Centuries, by blaming all unpleasant facts on "the Black Legend": "The Black Legend is the common belief, fostered by propaganda from primarily English and Dutch sources, that Spaniards are unusually cruel, greedy and depraved, that in nearly every controversy Spain represents the wrong side. The Black Legend came to be accepted, especially in English-speaking countries, because the most widely read documents about Spain were written by her mortal enemies: The English and the Dutch."

Does she really believe what she imputes to the Black Legend? Or, is she, once again, a witting liar, also on this account? Neither of the Carrolls, it must be repeated, is noted for scholarly accuracy or attention to historical truth.

...

Anne Carroll reveals the true purpose behind her reference to the Black Legend, by using it to attack the constitutional principles of the United States republic. ...

Carroll proceeds from the subject of the Black Legend, to weave it into a virtually treasonous attack on the very existence of the United States. She attacks the Declaration of Independence, claiming that it reflects the "liberal" philosophy of Jefferson. "The opening section set forth his liberal philosophy. He stated that governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed (not from God, not from traditions, not by inheritance, but from the people themselves); all authority comes from them.... It is usually opposed to hereditary monarchy. It emphasizes that men should be free to do whatever they want in moral matters and that political authority comes from the people themselves who should be free to overthrow existing governments—by violence if necessary—and to set up new governments based on the will of the majority, as interpreted and guided by intellectual leaders."

...

Carroll continues with a characteristically gnostic argument: "We Americans are so used to thinking that governmental authority should come from the people, that we might see nothing wrong with the political ramifications of Liberalism. We need to be reminded that all authority comes from God, and if authority is not exercised in harmony with God's law, then it is not legitimate. The standard is not, 'Is it the will of the people?' but, 'Is it the will of God?' "
...

Not only does this leading "intellectual" of the home-schools and "Catholic little schools" attack and outright falsify the Declaration of Independence, but also the U.S. Constitution. ...

Presumably, the U.S. Confederate Constitution, which does mention God, would be more to her liking. What she fundamentally rejects, is the notion of representative government as opposed to a theocracy. Moreover, she lies, claiming that the Declaration of Independence and U.S. Constitution are not based on Divine or Natural Law. Rather, like her co-thinker, Justice Scalia, she denies the existence of natural law, and, just as he attacks Pope John Paul II's opposition to death sentences from a feudalist standpoint, so does she.

...

She attacks the first U.S. Catholic Bishop, John Carroll, for accepting the separation of church and state, i.e., rejecting a theocratic view: "Because of his delight that Catholics were not persecuted by the U.S. government, he perhaps did not see the danger that this policy had of leading to religious indifferentism (the belief that one religion is as good as another, or even to the belief that a person is free to choose to practice no religion at all) and to the belief that the Church should not interfere in politics." Once again, the silly populist parades her antic whims as if they were solemn facts.

From this same standpoint, making up her alleged "facts" as she waddles, goose-like, down her pathway, she attacks the Monroe Doctrine: "Both Monroe and Adams were pro-revolt and anti-Spain, a position understandable in Monroe, who was a protégé of Jefferson, but more difficult to understand in the son of John Adams, who had stood virtually alone among U.S. leaders in opposing the French Revolution. Perhaps Adams saw the Latin American countries as reflections of the U.S. in asserting a tradition of self-government against a tyrannical monarch, a false view which has been commonly held by Americans ever since."

While her argument on this point might be brushed aside as an example of a silly, and very illiterate goose's efforts to write a page in history, the significance of this passage is the hatred against the very existence of the United States which she, like her understudy Quijano—who is also habituated to using antic whims as "facts"—has expressed openly since no later than September 1990.

It should come as no surprise that Anne Carroll supports Maximilian Hapsburg against President Benito Juarez in Mexico: "The United States had supported Juarez and denounced Maximilian because Juarez boasted of his adherence to Liberalism and democracy. But he set up a far tighter control over the country than the so-called autocrat, Maximilian, had done."

After all, Maximilian was a Hapsburg, one of her gushing Romantic's favorites, and made dictator of Mexico by a Napoleon III who was, like his uncle—and like Anne Carroll's Northern Virginia co-thinkers—a fascist. Fernando Quijano's denunciations of Juarez to LaRouche's associates in Mexico are essentially copies of Carroll's and probably did originate with her. She supports the fascists on the grounds of her perception that they are not liberal.

...

Given that Warren Carroll was recruited into Conservatives U.S.A. by Robert Morris, President of the University of Dallas, who was the former Chief Counsel for Sen. Joseph McCarthy, it should also be no surprise that Anne Carroll defends McCarthy: "The members of the leadership elite of America, although relatively few were actual Communists, saw no strong reason for opposing Communism because they had abandoned Christian truth. These were the men McCarthy fought; these were the men who fought him." "... [H]e died on May 2, 1957, the victim of an irrational hatred which has not entirely disappeared even forty years later."

In this context, it should also be noted that Triumph magazine often advertised the book McCarthy and His Enemies by William F. Buckley, Jr. and L. Brent Bozell, in which ads it was stated that the book "sustains McCarthy's basic thesis."

Her comments on the assassination of John F. Kennedy are also revealing. Remember that Conservatives U.S.A. took out an ad in a Dallas paper accusing Kennedy of treason the day he was assassinated and that the script of a radio show on "Heroism" written by her husband, Warren, was found in Jack Ruby's car the day he assassinated Lee Harvey Oswald.

"In the aftermath of the assassination," writes Carroll, "Americans indulged in an orgy of grief, glorifying Kennedy, his family and everything he had done.

"Since Kennedy was a liberal, and since Dallas was a conservative city, conservatives were seen as somehow to blame for the President's death, even though Oswald was a Communist sympathizer."

This reference to Kennedy is very ugly stuff, considering the fact that some of the international circles proven to have been involved in at least the politically motivated targetting, as distinguished from the act of shooting, of President Kennedy—the same circles of Carlists and others who were backers of the 1962 effort, based partly in fascist Spain, to assassinate France's President Charles de Gaulle—were part of the same radical utopian military and intelligence factions to which the Christendom-linked types adhere ideologically today. ...

The "religious" operations against Lyndon LaRouche's movement from Northern Virginia have involved not only nominal Catholics who are Carlist fascists, but also outright schismatics from the Catholic Church.

Christendom College/St. Catherine of Siena have tried to maintain the cover of being the true believers and supporters of Pope John Paul II. The Mission Statement of Christendom College, for example, states that the college is "institutionally committed to the Magisterium of the Roman Catholic Church."

Nonetheless, we find them often sleeping in the same political-theological beds with well-known individuals who are active schismatics from the Catholic Church and against the Pope; prominently, individuals connected to the schismatic group called The Remnant, based in Minnesota.

Typical are two of the leading individuals promoted by this group, Solange Strong Hertz of Leesburg, Va., and Gerry Matatics. Mrs. Hertz has also been involved in the targetting of leading associates of LaRouche in Northern Virginia, and as well as being an opponent of Pope John Paul II, she viciously opposes those principles LaRouche most stands for. A glance at her writings will make clear the problem they represent.

Solange Hertz also wrote prolifically for Bozell's Triumph magazine. From April 1972 to July 1973, Triumph published eight of her articles: "Among Women" (April 1972); "The Woman and Her Home: I. The Home as Divine Mystery" (May 1972); "The Woman and her Home: II. The Housewife's Vocation According to St. Paul" (June 1972); "The Crack in the Board" (July 1972); "Thoughts on the Working Mother: The Housewife as Martyr" (October 1972); "Walls, Roof and Door: The Home as Sanctuary" (January 1973); "A Millstone from Above: The Housewife as Guerrilla" (April 1973); and "D'abord, The Home: Mama's Manifesto" (July 1973).

Over the next 20 years, she published the following books: The Strange Spirit of '76, 1976; The Occult Franklin, 1983; Recanting Galileo, 1992; Star Spangled Heresy: Americanism, 1993; Utopia: Nowhere—Now Here, 1995; Beyond Politics: A Meta-Political View of History.

Hertz's books are published by Veritas Press in Santa Monica, California and Little Jon Publications in Los Angeles. The latter also produces The New Triumph, whose editor is Gary Potter. In 1966, Potter was the assistant editor of the original Triumph magazine. One of the three contributors to The New Triumph is Charles A. Coulombe ...


On the subject of the U.S. Civil War
, Hertz's fascist affinities are portrayed in dayglo colors. She writes: "one aspect of the Civil War which has been studiously ignored by establishment historians is its character as a war of religion. Protestants found themselves pitted against Catholics and Anglo-Catholics in a death struggle over two incompatible ways of life. The South retained far more vestiges of the old hieratic Christendom than did the North.... The bulk of American Catholics at that period of our history were Southerners.... Even in the North most Catholics were Southern sympathizers.... Catholic priests not tainted with Americanism ... had no hesitation in identifying the Faith with the Southern cause." "Furthermore the Confederate flag, the beloved 'Stars and Bars,' forms a cross, an emblem glaringly absent from all official U.S. iconography."

Hertz veers close to cheering over the 1863 New York draft riots, organized on behalf of the Confederacy, and even touches issues bearing upon accomplices in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, when she writes: "there is no getting around the fact that the only foreign power to recognize the Confederacy and receive its envoys was the Vatican.... How much of the Union strategy Lucifer may have worked out with the help of his underlings can't be ascertained, but it's history that in 1864 the tide turned irrevocably against the South, and the only movement even approaching a counter-revolution in the U.S. was thrown decisively off course."

This pro-Confederacy view was also the predominant one expressed in Triumph magazine. In the May 1971 issue, for example, Mel Bradford wrote an article entitled, "Lincoln's New Frontier: A Rhetoric for Continuing Revolution." Bradford maintained that the "Declaration [of Independence], [Gettysburg] Address and [Battle] Hymn [of the Republic] are therefore epitomies, hallowed by usage ... into a millennialist and gnostic injunction to the country (and indeed the species) at large." The "of, by, and for" formula is characterized as a millenarian blasphemy.

H.L. Weatherby's review of "The Southern Tradition at Bay" by Richard Weaver in the April 1969 issue of Triumph reflected the same pro-Confederate, Carlist view of Catholicism: "[T]hough most Southerners have never understood the fact (Allen Tate is a notable exception), the source of the feudalism, the chivalry, the gentleness, the 'religiousness' which Southerners fought so gallantly to defend is the Catholic Christian vision of civilization. Holy Scripture, The City of God, the Summa—these are our true metaphysical grounds."

So much, Triumph. Now, again, Solange Hertz: "To paraphrase Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, no 'nation so conceived or so dedicated can long endure,' for 'government of the people, by the people, for the people' must inevitably 'perish from the earth.' " If she were not a self-declared "woman without country," she might be justly considered a potential traitor to the United States ...



What EIR's investigation has uncovered, as we have documented, is nothing other than a fascist cult, which appears to have nearly succeeded in taking over the Arlington Diocese of the Catholic Church in Virginia. This cult is, provably, fascist, anti-Semitic and anti-American. At the same time, its representatives are deeply opposed to Pope John Paul II. Their Carlist belief-structure ultimately has nothing to do with Christianity.


The link for all this, again, is here

https://www.larouchepub.com/other/2002/2...kttns.html

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