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Friday, November 19, 2010
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Thousands of faithful attended an outdoor Mass in the rain on November 14, 2010 at the Valle de los Caídos. There were so many faithful in attendance that the crowd poured over into El Escorial. Traffic jams were experienced up to 10 km from the Basilica due to the number of faithful in attendance.

http://eponymousflower.blogspot.com/2010...dless.html
Awesome. How far my dear Spain has fallen, but there still remains a faithful remnant. May God reward them.
I am a common Spanish Catholic. Simply I send you this e-mail to apprise you of the current situation in the Benedictine Abbey of the Holy Cross of the Valley of the Fallen (“abadía benedictina de la Santa Cruz del Valle de los Caídos”), near Madrid (Spain) –sorry for my English. The most recent facts are:

- November 5, 2010 The Spanish Government banned indefinitely the celebration of the mass in the basilica. It provided reasons saying that “the serious deterioration of the building” (“el grave deterioro del conjunto patrimonial”).
- November 7, 2010 The monks’ community celebrated the mass by the roadside because the police had keeped out the faithful towards the abbey for the mass –order of the Government.
- November 14, 2010 The monks’ community celebrated the mass by the abbey, in the open-air (it was raining). The police already let the faithful by towards the abbey (not to the basilica), slowly, registering the cars –order of the Government.
- November 18, 2010 An association allied to the Government, the Forum of the Memory (“Foro de la Memoria”), requested to blow up the great cross of the Valley of the Fallen (like the Taliban did with Buda’s sculptures in Bamiyan).
- November 21, 2010 The monks’ community celebrated the mass by the abbey, like the 14th. I was there. It was an icy day (the abbey is between mountains). Some few ones wanted to interrupt the mass with political shouts, but they were muted quickly both by faithful and by the monks.

The Benedictine Abbey of the Holy Cross of the Valley of the Fallen is a sacred enclosure, place of catholic worship and a churchyard for the civil war two camps victims. There are the tombs of Francisco Franco Bahamonde and of Jose Antonio Primo de Rivera. Probably this fact is a sticky issue for an English-speaking. Perhaps the following annotations would be useful to lend understanding the current situation in the Valley of the Fallen:

- The disaster of the Civil War (1936-1939) was the end result of the Second Republic decaying, where the political parties both right and left wings already did not believe in the democracy, where everyone was trying to prise the other away.
- The Franco’s regime (1939-1975) was authoritarian, but not fascist. The fascism is characterized by its militant fanaticism, its mobilization of masses, its trend to a radical and modern change, its anticlericalism, its hatred towards the middle class, and so on. You cannot find this in Franco’s regime.
- The appearance of Franco’s regime scarcely surprises in the Europe of the thirties, when the Europe of the authoritarianisms full cry –with leaders and forms of government more or less in that way. What really calls the attention is its duration. The key of this lay in the trauma that supposed the civil war, in an spectacular economic growth (1950-1975) and in the progressive adjustment of the regime to the evolving international situation.
- The Transition to the democracy (began in 1975, but not started at ground zero) was a very interesting period, in which the idea widely agreeded was to reach consensus and to look onwards not to repeat the past mistakes.
- The current Government (2004-?) is lamentably characterized by its frivolity and low level. It does not furnish an answer to the current problems, especially the economic ones. Its ideological speech is simple and frequently irresponsible. As a distraction from the country’s real problems, it has backed out of the Transition work, to get muddy in past stories. You can add to this the current Government anticlericalism bordering on anticatholicism. At present, the ballot polls are unpromising for them and so they are looking for convenient headlines: this is the interpretation that they have placed to the Valley of the Fallen.

I finish with the prudent words of the abbot of the Benedictine Abbey of the Holy Cross of the Valley of the Fallen, Fr. Anselmo Álvarez (20-11-2010): “to prohibit the mass in the basilica reduces the religious freedom” (“prohibir la misa en la basílica merma la libertad religiosa”).

Yours faithfully.
May Santiago Matamoros prevail over the socialists and atheists that rule Spain.
(11-24-2010, 11:59 AM)FSE Wrote: [ -> ]I am a common Spanish Catholic. Simply I send you this e-mail to apprise you of the current situation in the Benedictine Abbey of the Holy Cross of the Valley of the Fallen (“abadía benedictina de la Santa Cruz del Valle de los Caídos”), near Madrid (Spain) –sorry for my English. The most recent facts are:

- November 5, 2010 The Spanish Government banned indefinitely the celebration of the mass in the basilica. It provided reasons saying that “the serious deterioration of the building” (“el grave deterioro del conjunto patrimonial”).
- November 7, 2010 The monks’ community celebrated the mass by the roadside because the police had keeped out the faithful towards the abbey for the mass –order of the Government.
- November 14, 2010 The monks’ community celebrated the mass by the abbey, in the open-air (it was raining). The police already let the faithful by towards the abbey (not to the basilica), slowly, registering the cars –order of the Government.
- November 18, 2010 An association allied to the Government, the Forum of the Memory (“Foro de la Memoria”), requested to blow up the great cross of the Valley of the Fallen (like the Taliban did with Buda’s sculptures in Bamiyan).
- November 21, 2010 The monks’ community celebrated the mass by the abbey, like the 14th. I was there. It was an icy day (the abbey is between mountains). Some few ones wanted to interrupt the mass with political shouts, but they were muted quickly both by faithful and by the monks.

The Benedictine Abbey of the Holy Cross of the Valley of the Fallen is a sacred enclosure, place of catholic worship and a churchyard for the civil war two camps victims. There are the tombs of Francisco Franco Bahamonde and of Jose Antonio Primo de Rivera. Probably this fact is a sticky issue for an English-speaking. Perhaps the following annotations would be useful to lend understanding the current situation in the Valley of the Fallen:

- The disaster of the Civil War (1936-1939) was the end result of the Second Republic decaying, where the political parties both right and left wings already did not believe in the democracy, where everyone was trying to prise the other away.
- The Franco’s regime (1939-1975) was authoritarian, but not fascist. The fascism is characterized by its militant fanaticism, its mobilization of masses, its trend to a radical and modern change, its anticlericalism, its hatred towards the middle class, and so on. You cannot find this in Franco’s regime.
- The appearance of Franco’s regime scarcely surprises in the Europe of the thirties, when the Europe of the authoritarianisms full cry –with leaders and forms of government more or less in that way. What really calls the attention is its duration. The key of this lay in the trauma that supposed the civil war, in an spectacular economic growth (1950-1975) and in the progressive adjustment of the regime to the evolving international situation.
- The Transition to the democracy (began in 1975, but not started at ground zero) was a very interesting period, in which the idea widely agreeded was to reach consensus and to look onwards not to repeat the past mistakes.
- The current Government (2004-?) is lamentably characterized by its frivolity and low level. It does not furnish an answer to the current problems, especially the economic ones. Its ideological speech is simple and frequently irresponsible. As a distraction from the country’s real problems, it has backed out of the Transition work, to get muddy in past stories. You can add to this the current Government anticlericalism bordering on anticatholicism. At present, the ballot polls are unpromising for them and so they are looking for convenient headlines: this is the interpretation that they have placed to the Valley of the Fallen.

I finish with the prudent words of the abbot of the Benedictine Abbey of the Holy Cross of the Valley of the Fallen, Fr. Anselmo Álvarez (20-11-2010): “to prohibit the mass in the basilica reduces the religious freedom” (“prohibir la misa en la basílica merma la libertad religiosa”).

Yours faithfully.

God bless you, sir, and welcome to Fisheaters!  :tiphat: I am of proud Spanish descent (as I'm sure many here are tiring of me saying  ;D) and I keep Spain in my prayers daily.
Rogamos que un nuevo Franco vendrá a  reclamar España una vez más para la mayor gloria de Dios y Su Iglesia Católica. ¡EL Cid, le necesitamos conducir a estos infieles nuevos-moriscos fuera de esta sagrada pais!  Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar, ¿donde estas?
FSE, may God bless you and may He bless Spain. I hope that Spanish Catholics will follow the good examples of General Franco and Jose Antonio and live out their faith both privately and publically.
I send you this brief e-mail to inform you that the situation persists in the Benedictine Abbey of the Holy Cross of the Valley of the Fallen (“abadía benedictina de la Santa Cruz del Valle de los Caídos”). Yesterday we celebrated mass with the monks in the open-air. It was hard. A person fainted for the cold behind me. If you want to see some pictures by way of illustration, you can look them at    http://www.minutodigital.com/2010/12/05/...os-caidos/

Please, would you say a prayer for these benedictine monks? Thank you very much indeed. God bless all of you.
Dear Sirs,

The government minister Ramón Jáuregui announced yesterday that they are ordering to re-open the basilica of the Abbey of the Holy Cross of the Valley of the Fallen on Sunday 19th. He argued safety reasons to block the faithfull access to a worship place from the beginning of November, coinciding with the Pope's visit to Spain. Clearly, the Government has seen the response and they do not want the international diffusion of images of monks and faithfull community celebrating the Christmas mass out in the open. In spite of this reopening, the minister stressed that the Government will continue in his determination to achieving the "recovery" ("recuperación") of the Benedictine Abbey of the Valley of the Fallen.

I finish expressing my thanks to your forum. It has been one of the very few English-speaking media which have echoed this anomalous and worrying situation in a western country: a Government preventing the mass in the basilica of a monastery for mere political interest.

Yours faithfully.
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