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KZ Gusen was called the "Hell of Hells".  But even there Christmas was celebrated.  On the parade ground and in secret:  the prisoner P. Jacques was able to celebrate Mass on 24. Dezember 1944. It was the most moving Liturgy of his life, reported a survivor.

http://eponymousflower.blogspot.com/2010...in-kz.html
Related, not related. This article is so depressing in that the Reich leadership banned Christian symbols in Bavaria. It is amazing to me, even after the general elections of 1933, where a majority of Catholic Bavarians and Badens(not sure of correct demonym for Black Forest region Germans) did not vote for National Socialism, that the Maenner and Volk would support the Reich's naked aggression all over Europe and then conceded to the Paganism of Berlin.



Hitler's Christmas party: Rare photographs capture leading Nazis celebrating in 1941
By Allan Hall
Last updated at 12:37 PM on 24th December 2010
Comments (52) Add to My Stories
A less festive bunch it’s hard to imagine.
This is Hitler and his henchmen celebrating Christmas in 1941 – not that you’d know it from their glum expressions.
These probably had something to do with the recent dispiriting failure of Nazi attempts to seize Moscow and take control of Russia.
High command: Adolf Hitler and other Nazi officials celebrate Christmas at the Lowenbraukeller restaurant in Munich on December 18, 1941
Sons of the swastika: Cadets at the feast
The pictures from December 18, which have only just come to light, show Hitler and his generals at a party for SS officer cadets in Munich.
But the Nazi Christmas was far from traditional.
Hitler believed religion had no place in his 1,000-year Reich, so he replaced the Christian figure of Saint Nicholas with the Norse god Odin and urged Germans to celebrate the season as a holiday of the ‘winter solstice’, rather than Christmas.
Out of sight at the top of the tree behind Hitler was a swastika instead of an angel, and many of the baubles carried runic symbols and iron cross motifs. The remarkable pictures were captured by Hugo Jaeger, one of the Fuhrer’s personal photographers.
He buried the images in glass jars on the outskirts of Munich towards the end of the war, fearing that they would be taken away from him.
Later he sold them to Life Magazine in America which published many of them this week.
Other photographs show brownshirt thugs drinking beer.
In 1944-1945, the Nazis tried to reinvent Christmas once again as a day to commemorate the dead, in particular fallen soldiers – by that time Germany had lost almost four million men in the war.
But while many Germans baked biscuits and cakes in the shape of swastikas and adorned their trees with the symbols of the Nazi regime, most still called the festival Christmas.
Spoils of war: Officers and cadets begin their dinner


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-...z198mevArC
Schwarzwald is Lutheran isn't it?
(12-25-2010, 12:20 PM)Augstine Baker Wrote: [ -> ]Schwarzwald is Lutheran isn't it?

The Black Forest?  Parts of it.  Places like Freiburg (a little south... :S) remained Catholic, because I think Austria owned them.
(12-25-2010, 02:55 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-25-2010, 12:20 PM)Augstine Baker Wrote: [ -> ]Schwarzwald is Lutheran isn't it?

The Black Forest?  Parts of it.  Places like Freiburg (a little south... :S) remained Catholic, because I think Austria owned them.

This is the area my Catholic German ancesters are from, the area around Frieburg.
(12-26-2010, 12:07 AM)oremus Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-25-2010, 02:55 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-25-2010, 12:20 PM)Augstine Baker Wrote: [ -> ]Schwarzwald is Lutheran isn't it?

The Black Forest?  Parts of it.  Places like Freiburg (a little south... :S) remained Catholic, because I think Austria owned them.

This is the area my Catholic German ancesters are from, the area around Frieburg.

They wouldn't be from Pfaffenweiler, would they?

[Image: Associated%20Press%20War%20is%20Hell%20V...%20War.jpg]


I was told that my grandfather read the entire New Testament in a foxhole on Christmas/Christmas Eve.
(12-26-2010, 11:54 AM)Heinrich Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-26-2010, 12:07 AM)oremus Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-25-2010, 02:55 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-25-2010, 12:20 PM)Augstine Baker Wrote: [ -> ]Schwarzwald is Lutheran isn't it?

The Black Forest?  Parts of it.  Places like Freiburg (a little south... :S) remained Catholic, because I think Austria owned them.

This is the area my Catholic German ancesters are from, the area around Frieburg.

They wouldn't be from Pfaffenweiler, would they?

Riegel.
(12-26-2010, 03:42 PM)oremus Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-26-2010, 11:54 AM)Heinrich Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-26-2010, 12:07 AM)oremus Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-25-2010, 02:55 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-25-2010, 12:20 PM)Augstine Baker Wrote: [ -> ]Schwarzwald is Lutheran isn't it?

The Black Forest?  Parts of it.  Places like Freiburg (a little south... :S) remained Catholic, because I think Austria owned them.

This is the area my Catholic German ancesters are from, the area around Frieburg.

They wouldn't be from Pfaffenweiler, would they?

Riegel.

Ah, Riegel. I understand there to be a native breed of dog from that area. A beagle like hound. The Riegel Beagle as it were. Cool that you are descended from there.