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By Dr. Carol Byrne

The defining characteristic of Distributists is the underlying belief that they are the Ones Who Know Best. This assumption underpins everything that Distributism stands for and everything Distributists accept or reject. They tell us, among other things, that we must flee the cities and go back to the land, work only from home, oppose the expansion of the financial sector, industry and technology, patronize the corner shop rather than the supermarket, not eat white bread or put chemical fertilizers on our crops, and above all never work for an employer or take out a mortgage to buy a home. What, it is pertinent to ask, entitles such people to supersede our own decision-making abilities and micromanage our living arrangements for us? And on what authority do they issue such momentous pronouncements?

Distributists would like us to believe that they speak in the name of the Church, claiming that their ideas are rooted in the Papal Encyclicals and in Catholic Social Teaching. But it can easily be shown that their ideas have simply been taken from the Marxist stockpot, having first been mediated by the early 20th-century Catholic Distributists – in particular Hilaire Belloc, G.K. Chesterton and Eric Gill – who saw the world through Socialist-tinted lenses.



Marx's thinking underlies Distributist principles
So how did these Distributist ideas come to be adopted and spread by Catholics? This is the central, most crucial question, for on its answer hangs the validity of the claim that Distributism is a system which Catholics could and should accept as a morally correct system.

It was Karl Marx, not the Popes, who taught that Capitalism can flourish only by means of social injustices, that the contract of hiring workers reduces them to “wage-slaves,” that it is in the nature of big business to concentrate wealth in the hands of the few and pauperize the masses, and that all transactions made by capitalists are driven solely by greed for profit. 


http://www.traditioninaction.org/HotTopi...eDist.html
Many of those statements apply to TIA as well.

And any system which focuses on this world, rather than God, is against God. The external appearance of a government does not matter as much as the beliefs of the people. A Catholic society could develop a multitude of ways to govern a nation, but that says nothing about the system itself.

There are a few systems which are, by nature, incompatible with the Faith.
(03-24-2011, 08:49 AM)Rosarium Wrote: [ -> ]Many of those statements apply to TIA as well.

And any system which focuses on this world, rather than God, is against God. The external appearance of a government does not matter as much as the beliefs of the people. A Catholic society could develop a multitude of ways to govern a nation, but that says nothing about the system itself.

There are a few systems which are, by nature, incompatible with the Faith.

Can you share more of what you know about TIA?
(03-24-2011, 08:50 AM)Catholic_Lawyer Wrote: [ -> ]
(03-24-2011, 08:49 AM)Rosarium Wrote: [ -> ]Many of those statements apply to TIA as well.

And any system which focuses on this world, rather than God, is against God. The external appearance of a government does not matter as much as the beliefs of the people. A Catholic society could develop a multitude of ways to govern a nation, but that says nothing about the system itself.

There are a few systems which are, by nature, incompatible with the Faith.

Can you share more of what you know about TIA?

The start of three blog posts about TIA: http://nonpeccabis.blogspot.com/2009/09/...ssues.html

It is rather lengthy for a forum post, so I don't really want to post it here.

A doctor named Carol? LOL. Stop worrying about distributism and get back in the kitchen.
(03-24-2011, 08:53 AM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]A doctor named Carol? LOL. Stop worrying about distributism and get back in the kitchen.

It could be an Anglicized version of the Polish version of the name Charles!

But I have a hard time taking anything from TIA seriously. At best they remind me of myself on a rant and are enjoyable to read.
(03-24-2011, 08:51 AM)Rosarium Wrote: [ -> ]
(03-24-2011, 08:50 AM)Catholic_Lawyer Wrote: [ -> ]
(03-24-2011, 08:49 AM)Rosarium Wrote: [ -> ]Many of those statements apply to TIA as well.

And any system which focuses on this world, rather than God, is against God. The external appearance of a government does not matter as much as the beliefs of the people. A Catholic society could develop a multitude of ways to govern a nation, but that says nothing about the system itself.

There are a few systems which are, by nature, incompatible with the Faith.

Can you share more of what you know about TIA?

The start of three blog posts about TIA: http://nonpeccabis.blogspot.com/2009/09/...ssues.html

It is rather lengthy for a forum post, so I don't really want to post it here.

I read through it and it didn't seem like anything damning. Could you sum up what's wrong with TIA?
(03-24-2011, 09:37 AM)Catholic_Lawyer Wrote: [ -> ]
(03-24-2011, 08:51 AM)Rosarium Wrote: [ -> ]
(03-24-2011, 08:50 AM)Catholic_Lawyer Wrote: [ -> ]
(03-24-2011, 08:49 AM)Rosarium Wrote: [ -> ]Many of those statements apply to TIA as well.

And any system which focuses on this world, rather than God, is against God. The external appearance of a government does not matter as much as the beliefs of the people. A Catholic society could develop a multitude of ways to govern a nation, but that says nothing about the system itself.

There are a few systems which are, by nature, incompatible with the Faith.

Can you share more of what you know about TIA?

The start of three blog posts about TIA: http://nonpeccabis.blogspot.com/2009/09/...ssues.html

It is rather lengthy for a forum post, so I don't really want to post it here.

I read through it and it didn't seem like anything damning. Could you sum up what's wrong with TIA?

Also, it looks like the author is a "Catholic Anarchist" which I know many trads consider to be unacceptable. Not me though .... I'm much more in line with that type of thinking than the trads (like Ferrara and Medaille) who want to boil dissenters in hot oil. (That's a joke ... they'd much prefer the more humane approach of life imprisonment with minimum usage of the torture rack)

http://nonpeccabis.blogspot.com/2009/09/...chist.html
(03-24-2011, 08:53 AM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]A doctor named Carol? LOL. Stop worrying about distributism and get back in the kitchen.

That joke just made my day, my friend!
(03-24-2011, 08:58 AM)Satori Wrote: [ -> ]
(03-24-2011, 08:53 AM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]A doctor named Carol? LOL. Stop worrying about distributism and get back in the kitchen.

It could be an Anglicized version of the Polish version of the name Charles!

But I have a hard time taking anything from TIA seriously. At best they remind me of myself on a rant and are enjoyable to read.

But the article and others from their site about distributism do seem to bring up some historical points of which I was unaware. Take the following...

http://www.traditioninaction.org/HotTopi...m_Odou.htm


Eric Gill,
the Pedophile Founder of Distributism

Patrick Odou


Eric Gill (1882-1940) was born in Brighton, England, to a minister of a small Protestant sect. He eventually became an artist, well known for his sculptures, engravings, sketches, writings, and type fonts. He married in 1904 and joined the Fabian Socialist Society in 1905. As is noted in Distributist Perspectives, he is one of the founding members of the Distributist worker community at Ditchling, Sussex. It was there that he entered the Catholic Church in 1913. In his lifetime, he would found two more worker communities. He would receive many important and prestigious commissions, including works for Westminster Cathedral, the League of Nations, the BBC, and the London Transport before his death in 1940.


Eric Gill
According to “Crossroads Lay Dominican Fraternities” website, updated by Fr. Jerry Stookey, OP, Promoter General of Dominican Laity (click here), Gill “was, together with other prominent figures like G. K. Chesterton, Hilaire Belloc and Fr. Vincent McNabb, OP, a founder of the Distributist movement.” Stookey also gives a definition of the movement:
“Distributism is an economic and social theory based on Catholic social teaching, regarded as a ‘third way’ between Capitalism and Socialism. It is one of the ideological roots of the Catholic Worker Movement, and has had an indirect influence on the New Economics of E. F. Schumacher and through him on today's Green movement.”
Gill’s articles and ideas are being revived, reprinted and spread by so-called traditional and conservative Catholics. For example, his article “Painting and the Public” was included in the book Distributist Perspectives: Volume 1, Essays on the Economics of Justice and Charity, published by IHS Press in 2004.

But what made Eric Gill famous was principally his art. How could one define his art? I searched the Internet and found answers that were all very similar:
• “Gill’s subject matter swung between the deeply religious and the highly erotic, a direct echo of his eccentric life.” (ericgill.com)

• “Eroticism forms an important part of his work” (ibid.).

• “Present [in Gill’s work] are designs of graphic, erotic scenes which stemmed from his bizarre view of sexual morality” (davidsongalleries.com).

• “[Gill] led a somewhat unconventional and alternative, often monastic lifestyle, including taking on many lovers and producing erotic engravings” (desktoppub.about.com/od/typedesigners/p/eric_gill.htm)
Some readers might think that these critics are exaggerating when they qualified Gill’s life and art as principally erotic. This was also my first reaction. To check, I decided to make a more extensive research. What I found categorically confirms the above-mentioned opinions.

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