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Let's say you find yourself at a gathering of people and the majority are protestants.  Maybe it's family, maybe it's something else obligatory.  Whatever.
They pray.  Now you respectfully and unobtrusively make the sign of the cross following the prayer?  Or not?  Or shout "Heretics!" and run away?
I happened to find myself in such situation and really felt as though the whole thing was fake or unreality.  I do not know how to describe how detached I was from the whole thing.  By making the sign of the cross am I condoning not just the prayer but the whole other belief system?  Am I overthinking this?  Am I yet another idiot with a keyboard?
Hey Gris - welcome to FE!

I'm an ex-Protestant, converted last year. I'm attending a TLM since January (new years resolution). my 7 yr old son was just baptized.

I'm the only Catholic in my family and my old friends are all Evangelicals. I'm just starting to make Catholic friends this year really.

I have lunch With my mom every few weeks, and supper with an Anglican family every few weeks. We always say grace before eating. Sometimes I pray, sometimes they do. Grace prayers arefairly universal, and always in Jesus name. I think it's good for non Catholics to pray to Jesus right? And they all know where I stand, sometimes violently so: one very close friend refused to come to my son's baptism cos I was consecrating him to Mary afterwards.

On another friends Facebook wall today I was telling him that he's a material heretic. He's ethnically Jewish but became a Protestant. But he'll ask me to pray for him.

I predict that some will have very strong opinions about this but sometimes it's easy to have an extreme opinion when you don't actually interact with Protestants.

The church allows Taize meetings, for example, within its walls - an ecumenical prayer service. Personally I think praying with Protestants in a safe context is a form of proper ecumenism in the sense that they're being exposed to Cathoic prayer. I'm open to be corrected about this and I'm certainly very wary of attending Protestant services but in a family setting it's different. Personally I would draw the line at praying with a non Christian.

I see it like praying in parallel. They're doing their thing I'm doing my thing. They know I've rejected Protestantism as a system.
It's give and take too. I had an Anglican buddy over a month ago and we prayed most of the 1962 hour of Prime together, said the Lord's prayer. You're not forced to say amen to their prayer.

Anyways, brace yourself for some gunfire about this but remember that opinions are opinions and you gotta back them up or they're just that.
I usually just twiddle my thumbs and wait for them to finish. At diner, I also patiently wait for them to finish their prayers then I make the sign of the cross and softly pronounce the prayer before meals. Beware, you may get some scowls doing this.
ETA: Unless it's just the Our Father--in which case they are praying as Catholics pray--I would avoid making the sign of the cross during their prayers for you might inadvertently encourage in them a false sense of true ecumenism
The following is an excellent article relating to the topic: http://www.christendom-awake.org/pages/t...holics.htm
I have friends that are protestants and some that are actually agnostics. If they would ask me to pray with them and really meant it. I would praise God and pray (and rejoice that they want to know God). I wouldn't go to a service but as far as personal prayer that is not a denial of the Catholic faith, I can't see that as wrong. After all Christ spoke with the Samaritan women at the well. She was the equivalent of a jewish heretic and a sinner. I think common sense and charity can govern praying with others of different faiths after all we're all children of God. Pray without ceasing.  Pray  Pray
(03-29-2011, 06:54 PM)Bakuryokuso Wrote: [ -> ]The church allows Taize meetings, for example, within its walls - an ecumenical prayer service. Personally I think praying with Protestants in a safe context is a form of proper ecumenism in the sense that they're being exposed to Cathoic prayer. I'm open to be corrected about this and I'm certainly very wary of attending Protestant services but in a family setting it's different. Personally I would draw the line at praying with a non Christian.
Pardon the expression, but Taize is a hellhole and a veritable den of iniquity. I had a friend who went there for a week (he was planning on staying longer) against my advice. Amongst other things, homosexuality, hashish, premarital sex, and hippie degenerates are rampant there. The Catholics don' t know what side their bread is buttered on, and nobody says boo about Protestants receiving Holy Communion.

Pardon the expression, but Taize is a hellhole and a veritable den of iniquity. I had a friend who went there for a week (he was planning on staying longer) against my advice. Amongst other things, homosexuality, hashish, premarital sex, and hippie degenerates are rampant there. The Catholics don' t know what side their bread is buttered on, and nobody says boo about Protestants receiving Holy Communion.
[/quote]

Protestants receiving Holy Communion big boo  Fo' Shame
(03-29-2011, 07:16 PM)St. Drogo Wrote: [ -> ]
(03-29-2011, 06:54 PM)Bakuryokuso Wrote: [ -> ]The church allows Taize meetings, for example, within its walls - an ecumenical prayer service. Personally I think praying with Protestants in a safe context is a form of proper ecumenism in the sense that they're being exposed to Cathoic prayer. I'm open to be corrected about this and I'm certainly very wary of attending Protestant services but in a family setting it's different. Personally I would draw the line at praying with a non Christian.
Pardon the expression, but Taize is a hellhole and a veritable den of iniquity. I had a friend who went there for a week (he was planning on staying longer) against my advice. Amongst other things, homosexuality, hashish, premarital sex, and hippie degenerates are rampant there. The Catholics don' t know what side their bread is buttered on, and nobody says boo about Protestants receiving Holy Communion.

Let the truth be heard. That's useful info, Saint-Druon.

Taize in my city (which I attended 2-3 times before switching to the TLM) is run by young Catholic nuns. No Eucharist, just candles. None of their songs contradict Catholicism. They sing in English, French, Latin, Spanish. They read a bit of scripture of some writing from Brother Roger, the Protestant founder. All in a Catholic basilica. My point is that it's a form of ecumenical prayer currently approved by the conciliar church.
The people in my area don't have Taize. So I cant way in on that topic. However it is good to pray with non-catholics at times simply because it brings them and you closer to God and His Church.
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