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In the "Novus Ordo" are kings or queens presently commemorated in Europe during Mass (Im thinking Spain mainly)?

Are they presently commemorated in the Extraordinary Form?

In the Canon/Eucharistic Prayer? I don't think so.

In the Intercessions of the Faithful, it's probably a common-enough option. There are probably a lot of American churches which pray for the President at that point, too.
(04-04-2011, 08:25 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]In the Canon/Eucharistic Prayer? I don't think so.

In the Intercessions of the Faithful, it's probably a common-enough option. There are probably a lot of American churches which pray for the President at that point, too.
To my knowledge they never were. The Missal for use in England has a prayer for the Monarch after the Leonine prayers and there is a votive Mass for her.
Pre-Trent, IIRC, it was common to add saints in the Communicantes.  This would be similar to how saints may be added to the Confiteor (for example, when I say the Benedictine office, we add "beato patri nostro Benedicto").  IIRC, the reigning monarchs would also be added to the Te Igitur.

That is pre-Trent though, Trent said the Canon must be unchanging and not customized place to place.

Catholic Encyclopedia, "Canon of the Mass" Wrote:Otherwise in the Middle Ages there was a great variety in the names [in the "Te igitur"]. A very old custom was to name the sovereign after the bishop ("et pro rege nostro N." or "Imperatore nostro N."). Pope Celestine I (422-32) refers to it in a letter to Theodosius II. Boniface I (418-22) writes to Emperor Honorius: "Behold in the very mysteries, among the prayers which the bishop offers for your Empire . . ." (Drews, Entstehungsgesch., 7). So also the "De Sacramentis" says: "Prayer is offered for the people, for the king, for the others" (IV, iv). Throughout the Middle Ages the sovereign was always named. Pius V removed the clause from the Missal. In the case of Catholic princes a privilege is given by which they are put in. In Austria the clause "et pro Imperatore nostro Francisco Josepho" is always added by the celebrant, and in Hungary it becomes of course "pro rege nostro".