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I have been reading a bit recently about Mt. Calvary, a traditional Episcopalian parish that is now in the process of joining the Catholic Church as an Anglican use parish.  Their website doesn't give a lot of info, though.  I was wondering if anyone here in the know when it comes to Anglican use issues (coughharelequinkingcough) knows anything about when this parish is expected to officialy become Catholic so I can go visit?  Or, at least, once they are assigned a Catholic priest to prepare them for their entry, about how long this process of preparation takes on average?
Don't know, but I'd be interested in checking it out too.
Info available online suggests disposition of Episcopal Church property is a significant issue. If they want to keep the real estate, they've got to buy the church out. My guess is the the Archdiocese of Baltimore isn't in a position to help with that a whole lot, but who knows? Perhaps none of this has any bearing on the ordination process of the priests in question.
(05-26-2011, 03:24 AM)WilfredLeblanc Wrote: [ -> ]Info available online suggests disposition of Episcopal Church property is a significant issue. If they want to keep the real estate, they've got to buy the church out.

I anticipate that this will likely delay the ultimate entry of the parish into the RCC.  It has been a major issue for many of the Anglican parishes that have sought to separate themselves from TEC; unfortunately, there is no clear legal precedent for handling this.  Some courts have upheld the parishes' ownership of their real property while other courts have upheld diocesan ownership.  What particularly irks me is that these parishes in many cases have no ultimate financial obligation to their diocese, yet the dioceses still believe they exercise ownership over the property.  All the same, you can likely expect a fight from the Diocese of Maryland if the parish doesn't go for the "buy-out."  What a racket.
(05-26-2011, 04:04 AM)EcceQuamBonum Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-26-2011, 03:24 AM)WilfredLeblanc Wrote: [ -> ]Info available online suggests disposition of Episcopal Church property is a significant issue. If they want to keep the real estate, they've got to buy the church out.

I anticipate that this will likely delay the ultimate entry of the parish into the RCC.  It has been a major issue for many of the Anglican parishes that have sought to separate themselves from TEC; unfortunately, there is no clear legal precedent for handling this.  Some courts have upheld the parishes' ownership of their real property while other courts have upheld diocesan ownership.  What particularly irks me is that these parishes in many cases have no ultimate financial obligation to their diocese, yet the dioceses still believe they exercise ownership over the property.  All the same, you can likely expect a fight from the Diocese of Maryland if the parish doesn't go for the "buy-out."  What a racket.

Well in all fairness if it was the other way around wouldn't you expect the Catholic Church to do everything in its power to hold onto a property?
The Diocese will have to buy the property and the congregation will have to pay the Diocese back. The conversion process is an year and half long for both priest and laity.
(05-26-2011, 12:44 PM)Mac_Giolla_Bhrighde Wrote: [ -> ]The Diocese will have to buy the property and the congregation will have to pay the Diocese back. The conversion process is an year and half long for both priest and laity.

Oh, really?  Where did you find this info?  After I posted the question, I found the parish's newsletter for march 2011 online and it said they expected to complete the process this easter.  What happened?
It's important to understand the Episcopal Church in America when it comes to these (and similar) matters, and I think HK and Jovan will back me up with this.

In America, many Episcopalian Churches are propped up with what is called "old money," that is, money from families that have been in America for 200-300 years. This is usually the only thing that keeps them going as there are few Episcopalians in The US. In fact, there are more Catholics in New York City than there are Episcopalians in America.

The Episcopalians have basically become a real estate holding company; sort of like the Jesuits.
(05-26-2011, 05:59 PM)Melkite Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-26-2011, 12:44 PM)Mac_Giolla_Bhrighde Wrote: [ -> ]The Diocese will have to buy the property and the congregation will have to pay the Diocese back. The conversion process is an year and half long for both priest and laity.

Oh, really?  Where did you find this info?  After I posted the question, I found the parish's newsletter for march 2011 online and it said they expected to complete the process this easter.  What happened?

That is the way it has been done in these scenarios. As to the conversion date, that just means this has already been in the works. Pretty much whatever group from the TEC that wants to swim the Tiber has already done so or are about to complete the conversion process. Any whole groups coming now will be groups that had already broken away and just got tired of being in the cold or the alternative Province they realigned with has soured. What use to be the Dio of Fort Worth of TEC keeps flirting, but they seem happy to stick with the "Southern Cone" alignment for now, as an example. That and they will have to settle the property lawsuit with the TEC.
Oh, I see, maybe they meant easter 2012 and I just assumed 2011.  That would be about a year and a half after they voted to join with Rome.
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