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I have been thinking how sad it is that often churches are prone to so much gossip.  We are called to Christian Charity, particularly with those we pray with.  Yet, often it is with these people that we are least charitable towards.  We pry into their lives, and whisper behind their backs.  Anyway I thought I would link the sermon on gossip from the movie Doubt.  In this scene the priest is giving a very self serving sermon; nonetheless, what he says is true!

great sermon! although I think I read something really similar a few months back.

great accent too!

Its def something that woman struggle with.
Yes indeed this is a beautiful sermon.  I believe it was first told by St. Philip Neri.  Just goes to show how hideous and deeply offensive to God gossip really is.  I've struggled with myself.  Thanks, be to God I'm finally beginning to root out this terrible sin in my life.  Once in a while I still do slip up though.
This maxim keeps one wary of initiating gossip:  Never mention the name of an absent third party in conversation, whether for good or ill.    It's not possible or advisable always to adhere to it, but calling it to mind goes a long way toward cutting down on this vice in oneself and others.   Even if you intend no malice, some people need very little pretext to begin rumor mongering, backbiting, damning with faint praise, slandering, etc.    I saw a lot of it in my former workplace. 

There are various ways to discourage a determined gossip who insists on using you as a sounding-board.   These include the extremes of administering a verbal rebuke or just walking away.
I was surprised how good Doubt was.  It's too bad that someone didn't tell him his stole was on wrong.
I could tell all of you about a lot of people who need to see this video.

Wait...

Is that gossip? 
(06-12-2011, 09:40 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]I was surprised how good Doubt was.  It's too bad that someone didn't tell him his stole was on wrong.

As Father Flynn represents the "spirit" of Vatican II, maybe it was intentional :-p
Nice video.

The pillow analogy is very powerful.
(06-12-2011, 09:45 PM)Someone1776 Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-12-2011, 09:40 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]I was surprised how good Doubt was.  It's too bad that someone didn't tell him his stole was on wrong.

As Father Flynn represents the "spirit" of Vatican II, maybe it was intentional :-p

Sort of.  He makes it a point that he desires a more progressive, engaging form of ministry; apparently, by this he intends more interaction between the clergy and parishioners, that Priests would be more directly involved in the life of a Catholic.  Insomuch as this was the goal, I agree with it at least as an allowance to combat a seriously slipping morality of American Catholics.  I saw the stole was off; that could have been intended for the reason you point out, or it could just have been a mistake.

In general, I thought the movie was very powerful and was surprisingly even-handed, never pushing the audience to believe Fr. Flynn molested - or even acted imprudently - towards any of the students.  This scene is the most memorable for me and is a message upon which I continue to meditate.
(06-12-2011, 10:07 PM)kingtheoden Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-12-2011, 09:45 PM)Someone1776 Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-12-2011, 09:40 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]I was surprised how good Doubt was.  It's too bad that someone didn't tell him his stole was on wrong.

As Father Flynn represents the "spirit" of Vatican II, maybe it was intentional :-p

In general, I thought the movie was very powerful and was surprisingly even-handed, never pushing the audience to believe Fr. Flynn molested - or even acted imprudently - towards any of the students.  This scene is the most memorable for me and is a message upon which I continue to meditate.

You are actually dead-wrong (I say this as respectfully as possible).  The movie is very careful to never explicitly state whether Father Flynn is guilty, but looked at  in its totality the movie is very unambiguous as to what happened, albeit the movie and play are very subtle.  There is only one correct way to interpret the movie.  I find it ironic that so many people have taken a relativistic approach to this movie/play when this work is arguing against such relativism.  And Father Flynn absolutely represents the "spirit" of Vatican II (although he does represent other things as well such as the clergy and men). And based on how his interactions with others impacts their faith, you can judge what the author thinks about the "spirit" of Vatican II. 

Something else to keep in mind is the movie begins with Father Flynn giving a sermon on how doubt is nothing to be feared and that it can actually be more powerful than faith in connecting us to God.  Based on the last scene do you think the other characters agree with this?

If you really want to know what happened, pay attention to the light bulb in Sister Aloysius's office. Its no accident that the movie focuses on the light bulb during two critical scenes and that Sister Aloysius comments on it in both scenes.   Think about what the relationship between light and truth is.  Also note how Father Flynn reacts anytime light is shined on him. 

The scene in which one of the character asks for sugar is also important.  Think of the slang "give me some sugar." Note that one character says they "can never get enough sugar," another character says they "never take sugar," and the third character comments that they "used to take sugar, but no longer do."

Father Flynn's unusual nail clipping habit is also another clue.

P.S. I was just joking about the stole. It probably was just a mistake. 
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