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I've read enough convert and revert stories... my real question is:  what makes a cradle Catholic stay and grow to practice their faith well?

Did anyone grow up trad? If you didn't, how did you survive the post-VII catachesis and poor liturgy? How did you find your way to tradition against the current?
What role if any did your family play in the passing on and retaining of the teachings of the Church?  What family traditions or devotions sustained you?

My goal is to raise my children well and teach them the faith as best as I can, but my parents never raised me in any church, so the whole thing is a bit of a mystery to me.
I was raised as an anti-communist.  Fatima convinced me that the Catholic Church was legit, though I knew something was terribly wrong in the Church.  I kept looking.  In my late 30s I found Tradition and came home.

Raise your kids in Tradition and you should be fine.  Though don't over-shelter, or they will rebel.
James give us your definition of over sheltering them, like not letting them talk to the Y2K folks in your local chapel lololol
LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL
No...ya gotta let kids talk to the nuts....kids need a laugh too.
There's trads that won't let their boys play on the county baseball team because there are prots on the team, etc.... Really bad idea.  Let them play and learn about the real world.

But let's not derail the thread.  She wants stories of why people growing up NeoCatholic stayed Catholic.
I actually remember Y2K.  I was on Y2K coverage for an oil refinery.  The company thought it might shut down and blow up.  So me and my bud were out on graveyards.  So we climbed up on top of the derrick on a coker, about 300 ft. up.  We decided if it was going to blow, we might as well have a good view.  The only thing we saw were the locals shooting fire works into the refinery at midnight to celebrate the new year.  It was kind of a local tradition.  They even started a small grass fire.
I survived my "Catholic" upbringing and stayed in the Church by the grace of God.

By no means was I raised a trad. I'd say my upbringing wasn't even of the neo-Catholic sort, at least neo-Catholic in the sense that anyone around you even discussed any Church doctrine at all or had an opinion favoring the pope. My Catholic upbringing on the external was a complete joke. I'd say it was your average "Catholic" upbringing of the Generation X variety where almost none of my Catholic classmates and siblings have remained with the Church, and we didn't really learn anything despite the fact that we dutifully attended mass every Sunday and had "religious" "education" through Confirmation in high school. There was one bright spot -- I was friends with a tight-knit Catholic family that became like my 2nd family, and I would say they played a positive role in my otherwise lousy Catholic upbringing. They practiced their faith every day, it was infused in their daily lives and conversations, church wasn't just something left for Sunday. They were a loving family that actually talked about things like abortion, contraception, hell, sin, the devil... I certainly didn't hear about those things much anywhere else. To make a long story short, authentic and traditional Catholicism was just something I was always drawn to despite my watered down upbringing....I can't attribute my staying in the Church to anything but the grace of God.   Shrug

I was born on the feast day of Pope St. Pius X...given his concerns about modernism and love for tradition and orthodoxy, I like to think he has also been looking out for me. Smile

I would say that the mistakes made by many parents of my generation was that they had little direct involvement with the religious education of their kids. I guess the belief was that the local CCD teacher could handle it, but as I said before, our CCD was crap. And otherwise, nothing much was spoken of it in the home and mass was just a duty that was fulfilled on Sunday (or when people felt like it.) So that you plan on being directly involved is a good start. More or less, like my friend's family has shown, the faith needs to be in a family's daily life and not just left to Sunday.

I also agree with the sentiments above, of not overly sheltering them to the point where they can't cope with the outside world when they are of age. I knew of many fundie, Mormon and preacher's kids that went nuts when they were cut loose.
(06-26-2011, 12:40 AM)James02 Wrote: [ -> ]I actually remember Y2K.  I was on Y2K coverage for an oil refinery.  The company thought it might shut down and blow up.  So me and my bud were out on graveyards.  So we climbed up on top of the derrick on a coker, about 300 ft. up.  We decided if it was going to blow, we might as well have a good view.  The only thing we saw were the locals shooting fire works into the refinery at midnight to celebrate the new year.  It was kind of a local tradition.  They even started a small grass fire.

My sister and I turned off everything and told mom the water wasn't working...

We were young, but we weren't letting a failed doomsday go to waste.
(06-25-2011, 11:59 PM)iona_scribe Wrote: [ -> ]I've read enough convert and revert stories... my real question is:  what makes a cradle Catholic stay and grow to practice their faith well?
They have to choose to.

Quote:Did anyone grow up trad? If you didn't, how did you survive the post-VII catachesis and poor liturgy? How did you find your way to tradition against the current?
I did, but it still comes down to choosing it.

Quote:My goal is to raise my children well and teach them the faith as best as I can, but my parents never raised me in any church, so the whole thing is a bit of a mystery to me.
Give them a solid foundation in the faith and most importantly always be there.

Get the Baltimore Catechism and teach them the lives of the saints.

One of the great indicators of falling away from the faith is how the father is.
I did 'leave' the Church when I was a young teen, because I just didn't feel like it was helping me and my interests lay outside it. But now that I've returned, I have discovered that all my true interests are already within the Church and more fully expressed by it! I thank God for being born into the Church because it was those formative experiences that really cemented a love of God in my life (that weathered the worst experiences I went through). I rediscovered my faith, and tradition, in the UK - surrounded by atheists for the first time in my life.
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