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I had a very odd question that I'm hoping someone can help me with.

Anyone know how many Christians from 1100 to 1500 spoke in Middle English Dialect??  I'm assuming that this was the language that was spoken in England and Scotland during secular public events(outside of church) and amongst families in the home?? Or was Latin still the dominant language at this time in England?? Did the kings of England at this time speak in middle English or French??
It's my understanding Latin was never very dominant in Roman England, just as it was never dominant in Judea.  Although high percentage of words in English come from Latin, apparently most of these words entered the English language after the seventeenth century as grammarians tried to make English a more civilized language. 
(07-17-2011, 03:27 PM)Someone1776 Wrote: [ -> ]It's my understanding Latin was never very dominant in Roman England, just as it was never dominant in Judea.  Although high percentage of words in English come from Latin, apparently most of these words entered the English language after the seventeenth century as grammarians tried to make English a more civilized language. 

A good number of such words also come from the influence of Norman French.
(07-17-2011, 03:34 PM)Resurrexi Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-17-2011, 03:27 PM)Someone1776 Wrote: [ -> ]It's my understanding Latin was never very dominant in Roman England, just as it was never dominant in Judea.  Although high percentage of words in English come from Latin, apparently most of these words entered the English language after the seventeenth century as grammarians tried to make English a more civilized language. 

A good number of such words also come from the influence of Norman French.

Ah right.
not much middle english was spoken in scotland. english wasnt the dominate language of most of scotland or ireland during those times
(07-17-2011, 03:42 PM)devotedknuckles Wrote: [ -> ]not much middle english was spoken in scotland. english wasnt the dominate language of most of scotland or ireland during those times

So gaelic was spoken during these times in Scotland too??
(07-17-2011, 03:21 PM)crusaderfortruth3372 Wrote: [ -> ]I had a very odd question that I'm hoping someone can help me with.

Anyone know how many Christians from 1100 to 1500 spoke in Middle English Dialect??  I'm assuming that this was the language that was spoken in England and Scotland during secular public events(outside of church) and amongst families in the home?? Or was Latin still the dominant language at this time in England?? Did the kings of England at this time speak in middle English or French??

For the early portion of that time, Norman French was the language of the courts. The peasants spoke in either their Celtic vernacular (if in Wales or Scotland) or in an extremely difficult to understand English form. The biography of Wallace that I read recently, of which I made mention, quotes primarily from Blind Harry, is that Middle English. I think that by 1500 the courts and peasants of England had adopted early modern English. The Celtic lands had virtually adopted it as well, except for the isolated parts.
adopted is a rather political correct term for forced domination and murder.
sip
at that time ireland was almost all Irish speaking. Scotland save maybe the lowlands was Gaelic speaking. it wasn't until after the clearances that limey started dominating in Scotland and not until after an gorta mor did  limey became the dominate lingua in ireland and not
(07-17-2011, 03:57 PM)devotedknuckles Wrote: [ -> ]adopted is a rather political correct term for forced domination and murder.
sip
at that time ireland was almost all Irish speaking. Scotland save maybe the lowlands was Gaelic speaking. it wasn't until after the clearances that limey started dominating in Scotland and not until after an gorta mor did  limey became the dominate lingua in ireland and not

Haha trying to cover my ass that's all. I am Celtic and Saxon, so I am kinda at odds with myself.
there was no standard of middle english, which grew from norman french and old english merging, anyways the population of england at any given point during the period was probably in the low millions... keep in mind cornish and welsh was widely spoken - cornish started to really fizzle out with the reformation after a series a failed revolts against the protestants 

(07-17-2011, 04:02 PM)UnamSanctam Wrote: [ -> ]Haha trying to cover my ass that's all. I am Celtic and Saxon, so I am kinda at odds with myself.
since im an amateur genetic anthropologist the closest relatives of english are the basque - genetically english have remained relatively unchanged post ice age despite celtic, latin and germanic invasions

"germanic" dna (I1a) haplogroup never exceeds 25% of the population for the most part, R1b (celtic and basque) is the majority of the population



[Image: Eng_welsh_ibd.png]
 
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