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I wasn't sure which forum to put this in, so I just plopped it here...

So many of us are using Kiersey's personality types to describe themselves on their profile, I was curious what other posters' thoughts are on his model.  Also, I'm curious about how many of you view these types as changeable.  I've taken the test a few times, I used to always come out as one of the Idealist types, particularly the "Healer" or INFP.  But the last time I took the test, I came out as a "Mastermind" or INTJ.  I've kind of had a sense of "coming into my own" in the past year.  I have grown very weary of my old habit of taking in sad souls and trying to be their hero, not something I did intentionally, mind you. In the past few years since an ugly break-up, I have read many books on improving my confidence levels so that I would be comfortable with things like public speaking, and asserting myself within interpersonal relationships.  Did my efforts cause me to actually change my personality?  If so, that's kind of cool.  Not to say that being a "Healer" is bad, but it just seems it wasn't working for me for some reason.  It's interesting to me that all my efforts at change would have such an effect on how I fill out a personality questionaire in such a relatively short time span.
It's an interesting way of looking at it. I have the opposite experience--I get more INFP all the time. At least my inability to deal with the practical details of everyday life seems to get worse rather than better.  :laughing: When I took the test, which was several years ago, I got a cross between INFP and INTP. I think the traits that made it seem like I was INTP are ones that I used to have much more strongly, and which I seem to have mostly lost. I used to care about theories and abstracts; now I just care about what people do and why. So I think it is possible to for your "type" to change, at least in some things.
(07-26-2011, 12:18 PM)Iolanthe Wrote: [ -> ]I used to care about theories and abstracts; now I just care about what people do and why.

That can be theoretical and abstract too.

I get mostly INTP in tests, once I got INTJ. INTPs are information gobblers; we exist to look for knowledge and consume it without discriminating between useful knowledge to have and useless knowledge. Which sounds a bit creepy.

One of the bad things about psychological self-examination is that you can mix up how you actually behave with your ideals. So, in a question like "Do you go out of your way to make others feel appreciated?" perhaps you think that doing so is silly, so you choose No, when in reality you do it all the time, and should have selected Yes.

That said, changing personality type is most likely possible, but it could only come as a result of a dramatic change in your life, since the objective of these personality categorization systems is to pinpoint your natural tendencies, and it is uncommon for a person's nature to change. The ugly break-up you mentioned could be something that drove you to change radically. Or, it could well be your way of thinking, your ideals, that changed, not your nature. I don't know.

Another popular personality types system is the Enneagram, which is built around what makes each person tick. It has pagan roots/connections so one should keep one's distance from it. There are free Enneagram tests out there, but I actually didn't need to take one to know I'm a pretty solid Type 5. Here is a comparison between Enneagram and MBTI/Keirsey.

edit: This belongs to Pig Roast. But it's good you posted it here since I don't want to step in there!
I'm INTJ but the T and J scores were borderline so I wouldn't be surprised if I came out with a different score if I redid the test.  It wouldn't indicate a big personality change, just a slight shift.
I don't know if the types are changeable. I can see someone going from INTJ to INTP or something like that, maybe.

I personally can't see myself ever changing from INTJ though. But change is never expected!
I think this, like other "personality type" systems, is very useful for some purposes, but crazy to put too much stock in.

Jayne is a T, I am an F.  Knowing this sometimes helps us to understand why the other one says or does something.  They aren't being stupid or insensitive or deliberately wimpy or illogical, they just approach things differently.

Jayne is a J, I am a P.  We can work around that, if we're aware of it.  But if we let Jayne make a schedule that requires tight timing, and then we expect me to follow it, it doesn't work.

But I think the theory is that we learn certain skills very early and are most comfortable with using them, then as we grow older we become more comfortable with the other skills and become more well-rounded personalities.

By the way, why are these called "Kiersey" personality types?  I've always heard them referred to as "Myers-Briggs", and of course they are based on Jung's theories.
(07-26-2011, 01:44 PM)m.PR Wrote: [ -> ]Another popular personality types system is the Enneagram, which is built around what makes each person tick. It has pagan roots/connections so one should keep one's distance from it. There are free Enneagram tests out there, but I actually didn't need to take one to know I'm a pretty solid Type 5. Here is a comparison between Enneagram and MBTI/Keirsey.

Again, useful for some purposes, but don't take it as more than it is.  But it is very useful to realize that other people are motivated by different factors than we are, and to have some understanding of what these motivations could be.

I had a Christian psychologist explain the enneagram to me as a list of the different kinds of ways that we sin.

Similarly for the Love Languages stuff -- just be aware that what makes you feel loved may not be what makes your spouse or child or friend feel loved.  Some are most affected by words, others by actions, others by physical contact, others by thoughtful gifts.

Ditto for all the other systems of classifying people.  The classifications may or may not mean anything, but it helps one to understand how people are different.  Some students learn by doing and only then are ready for the theory that explains it all, others need to understand the theory before they are ready to try actually doing it.  But we all have a tendency to assume that others think and feel the same way as we do, or that if they don't, there's something wrong with them.
(07-26-2011, 02:10 PM)NOtard Wrote: [ -> ]By the way, why are these called "Kiersey" personality types?  I've always heard them referred to as "Myers-Briggs", and of course they are based on Jung's theories.

This is what Wikipedia says:

Wikipedia Wrote:David W. Keirsey mapped four 'temperaments' to the existing Myers-Briggs system groupings SP, SJ, NF and NT; this often results in confusion of the two theories. However, the Keirsey Temperament Sorter is not directly associated with the official Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. [source]

--

The Keirsey Temperament Sorter (KTS) is a self-assessed personality questionnaire designed to help people better understand themselves and others. It was first introduced in the book Please Understand Me. The KTS is closely associated with the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI); however, there are significant practical and theoretical differences between the two personality questionnaires and their associated different descriptions. [source]

Maybe he came up with some of the names (Architect for INTP, Mastermind for INTJ, etc.), which is why we are asked our Keirsey type in our profiles.
I have only one type: sinner.
(07-26-2011, 02:29 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: [ -> ]I have only one type: sinner.

Well, that's not very useful.
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