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[Image: St-Gemma-Galgani-color-picture-123.jpg]

http://www.stgemmagalgani.com

She wanted to be a nun, applied to many different orders, but all rejected her.
But most of all she wanted to be a passionist nun.

Even until her death in the early 20s, she still wasn't a nun.


You can read the autobiography that the devil tried to burn here:
http://www.stgemmagalgani.com/2008/11/au...lgani.html


You can see the personal items (relics) of St Gemma here:
http://www.stgemmagalgani.com/2011/03/ph...items.html

[Image: St-Gemma-black-wool-dress.jpg]
what a modest dress!


Diary of St. Gemma:
http://www.stgemmagalgani.com/2008/11/di...-1900.html

It's all in the website. Cool web  Smile


Download spiritual readings and cathechisms:
http://saintsbookscatechisms.blogspot.com/
http://www.saintsbooks.net/
http://www.goodcatholicbooks.org/
http://www.basilica.org/pages/ebooks.php

Download mother angelica videos and audios EWTN classics, and books:
http://motherangelicalive.blogspot.com/

These will change your life.
I am convinced st. Gemma is one of the most lovely saints ever.
Yes, that's a lovely website. She's one of my favorites, too.
Although I acknowledge and deeply admire St Gemma's manifest sanctity, still... there is something about her that is deeply unsettling to me... I find her life, her character, and even her picture -- the way she stares out at you with those eyes -- somehow... bone-chilling -- she just sends shivers down my spine.

Maybe it's just me, but some of the examples set by the Saints are simply so far beyond my own comprehension and understanding that -- and I intend no disrespect in saying this -- they really creep me out.

Sometimes I have real difficulty relating to them on a human level.

(09-13-2011, 10:21 AM)Fripod Wrote: [ -> ]Although I acknowledge and deeply admire St Gemma's manifest sanctity, still... there is something about her that is deeply unsettling to me... I find her life, her character, and even her picture -- the way she stares out at you with those eyes -- somehow... bone-chilling -- she just sends shivers down my spine.

Maybe it's just me, but some of the examples set by the Saints are simply so far beyond my own comprehension and understanding that -- and I intend no disrespect in saying this -- they really creep me out.

Sometimes I have real difficulty relating to them on a human level.

It's odd, she looks somewhat like a puritan, and there's an aloofness that borders on condescension, yet we know she was not like that inside. Perhaps she was (like many of the saints) naturally diffident and shy? St. Thomas' phlegmatic stoicism was interpreted as anger or sternness by many, but he was simply a quiet man. Stained glass portraiture tends to make saints thin, beautiful, and happy; as they are now, perhaps, but certainly not as they were in life.
(09-13-2011, 12:36 PM)Laetare Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-13-2011, 10:21 AM)Fripod Wrote: [ -> ]Although I acknowledge and deeply admire St Gemma's manifest sanctity, still... there is something about her that is deeply unsettling to me... I find her life, her character, and even her picture -- the way she stares out at you with those eyes -- somehow... bone-chilling -- she just sends shivers down my spine.

Maybe it's just me, but some of the examples set by the Saints are simply so far beyond my own comprehension and understanding that -- and I intend no disrespect in saying this -- they really creep me out.

Sometimes I have real difficulty relating to them on a human level.

It's odd, she looks somewhat like a puritan, and there's an aloofness that borders on condescension, yet we know she was not like that inside. Perhaps she was (like many of the saints) naturally diffident and shy? St. Thomas' phlegmatic stoicism was interpreted as anger or sternness by many, but he was simply a quiet man. Stained glass portraiture tends to make saints thin, beautiful, and happy; as they are now, perhaps, but certainly not as they were in life.

I think what causes it to seem this way for me is that there is simply nothing inside me that corresponds or allows me to relate to that sort of deeply affective mysticism.

It probably has more to do with my spiritual formation in Eastern Christianity than anything, where on the whole there is an entirely different subjective approach to the spiritual and mystical life.
Hey, I did a comic about her. It's here:

http://catholicforum.fisheaters.com/inde...994.0.html

Or I think it is anyway.
Padre Pio called her the Great Saint.

The biography by her spiritual confessor is really good. Love that website.
(09-13-2011, 10:21 AM)Fripod Wrote: [ -> ]Although I acknowledge and deeply admire St Gemma's manifest sanctity, still... there is something about her that is deeply unsettling to me... I find her life, her character, and even her picture -- the way she stares out at you with those eyes -- somehow... bone-chilling -- she just sends shivers down my spine.

Maybe it's just me, but some of the examples set by the Saints are simply so far beyond my own comprehension and understanding that -- and I intend no disrespect in saying this -- they really creep me out.

Sometimes I have real difficulty relating to them on a human level.

I think I may understand how you feel.  How I interpret it is that this is a human reaction, a fear even, of some glimmer, some reflection of the beauty and mystery of God.  It is quite unsettling in a way.

I don't get this sense from St. Gemma, but I do get it from others.

ETA:  I think it's most helpful to read about and pray to those saints whom you feel a connection with and with whom you can more easily identify.  If you can't understand one saint then I wouldn't worry too much about it.  However, it can be very fruitful to take those saints who seem most alien to you and to contemplate their words and actions.  Each saint reflects some unique piece of God and we can probably learn the most from those who seem so alien to us.
(09-13-2011, 11:00 PM)Fripod Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-13-2011, 12:36 PM)Laetare Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-13-2011, 10:21 AM)Fripod Wrote: [ -> ]Although I acknowledge and deeply admire St Gemma's manifest sanctity, still... there is something about her that is deeply unsettling to me... I find her life, her character, and even her picture -- the way she stares out at you with those eyes -- somehow... bone-chilling -- she just sends shivers down my spine.

Maybe it's just me, but some of the examples set by the Saints are simply so far beyond my own comprehension and understanding that -- and I intend no disrespect in saying this -- they really creep me out.

Sometimes I have real difficulty relating to them on a human level.

It's odd, she looks somewhat like a puritan, and there's an aloofness that borders on condescension, yet we know she was not like that inside. Perhaps she was (like many of the saints) naturally diffident and shy? St. Thomas' phlegmatic stoicism was interpreted as anger or sternness by many, but he was simply a quiet man. Stained glass portraiture tends to make saints thin, beautiful, and happy; as they are now, perhaps, but certainly not as they were in life.

I think what causes it to seem this way for me is that there is simply nothing inside me that corresponds or allows me to relate to that sort of deeply affective mysticism.

It probably has more to do with my spiritual formation in Eastern Christianity than anything, where on the whole there is an entirely different subjective approach to the spiritual and mystical life.

Fripod, could you clarify what you mean by this, exactly? I too had an initial spiritual formation in Eastern Christianity before finally returning to the Roman Catholic Church for doctrinal reasons; so I'm interested in your experiences and observations of this "entirely different subjective approach to the spiritual and mystical life."
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