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[Image: All-Saints-Day.jpg]

Names Day

The celebration of birthdays is not the original practice in Catholic homes.It
only spread within the past few centuries, replacing the earlier Christian
custom of observing the feast day of the Saint whose name was acquired in
Baptism.

The celebration of Saint's feasts is a part of the liturgical life of the Church.
Thus any person observing the feast of "his" Saint immediately enters into the
warm sphere of liturgical radiation and spiritual enrichment. Compared to this,
the celebration of the birthday is more worldly, merely natural and almost
accidental in its lack of significance.

It is not necessary that we do away with our customary birthday
celebrations. But we should certainly try to restore the meaningful Catholic
tradition of celebrating the feast of the Saint whose name was given in Baptism
and who is our personal patron, loving and helping us whether we observe or
neglect his veneration. Children will surely not object to the keeping of the
"name-day," for to them it will mean, besides all its other significance, another
personal feast day every year.

If a child has been taught to pray to his Patron Saint every night, he will
greet the feast of the Saint with a thrill of joy and spiritual elevation. It is his
"own" feast, and the whole family should make him happily aware of it. After
all, birth is a common event shared with the same significance by all members
of the family. The Patron Saint however, is not usually shared with brothers
and sisters, thus making his feast so unique and exclusive, at least in its
psychological aspect.

According to ancient traditions, the name-day is festively held in Christian
homes. I remember how from early childhood I went to church with my father
every year on the feast of St. Francis Xavier, attending the Holy sacrifice and
later receiving Communion too. Returning home, I found the table cheerfully
decorated with flowers and little presents. Mother, father, brothers and sisters
offered their congratulations. Then we sat down to a joyful breakfast, my proud
little self sitting in the place of honor. And all this because centuries ago a
wonderful young man in Spain loved God so much that he became a Saint. I
cannot express the powerful conviction that filled me every year on this
occasion, how great and important it is to become holy. This was one of the
eloquent lessons which our religious customs taught me without words, but
with an effect greater than many words could achieve. Judging from this
aspect, we may truly say that such Catholic customs in the home educate the
children more than the best Catholic teachers could ever do in school.

As a parish priest I have often asked children about the Saints whose
names they bore. It is tragically sad to see how few of them in our time have
any idea who their Patron Saint was. They know nothing about him, they do not
know when his feast is kept, they have no devotion to him. These same
children, however, know most of the Hollywood stars and television
celebrities; they ( at least the boys ) know the make of every car at a quick
look; they know the names and achievements of the players on football and
baseball teams. Only the Saint whose name is theirs they do not know.

Who is to blame for this ignorance? There is only one answer: the parents.
Do not say, " The nuns should explain these things in school." That would be
too late. It has to be done when the children are three or four years old. And
who can teach them at that age but Mother and Father?

What has been said above we adult people might as well apply to
ourselves. Do you know your Patron Saint? Do you celebrate his feast with
Mass, Holy Communion and special prayers ? Do you daily invoke his loving
help and protection?

You can achieve a great task of the apostolate that might spread its
influence down to future generations if you will restore in your family the
Catholic custom of venerating the personal Patron Saints and celebrating the
name-day.

http://traditionalromancatholicism.org/Namesday.html
Please don't create posts simply pasting from other websites!  If you have someone you want to say, quote the relevant part and make your comments.
(08-18-2011, 03:16 PM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: [ -> ]Please don't create posts simply pasting from other websites!  If you have someone you want to say, quote the relevant part and make your comments.
I quite enjoyed this article and thought I'd share.

Well, there goes my participation here.
See, I post novenas or post what I believe is relevant from other sites......
because I trust Priests and Saints writings and comments much more than I do my own.
God bless you.
(08-18-2011, 03:59 PM)Cindy Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-18-2011, 03:16 PM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: [ -> ]Please don't create posts simply pasting from other websites!  If you have someone you want to say, quote the relevant part and make your comments.
I quite enjoyed this article and thought I'd share.

Well, there goes my participation here.
See, I post novenas or post what I believe is relevant from other sites......
because I trust Priests and Saints writings and comments much more than I do my own.
God bless you.

LOL you don't have to leave on my account (!!),  but it's more helpful and better etiquette to write: "Here's a link to an article I liked, here's why I liked it."

Posting reminders for novenas is also very helpful.

But if I were to post everything I read and liked on this forum, I would clog it up.
Serbs are one of the only Catholic/Orthodox peoples who don't generally keep a name day. We keep our 'slava' the Saint's Day upon which our first ancestor joined the Church. Probably because when the Serbs converted they kept using pagan names (e.g., 'Vuk'=wolf) and there were no Saints with those names.
A great piece!!!!!!!!!!
I wish I could do this, but I wasn't given a saint's name at Baptism.  Do I just use my confirmation saint?
Thanks for posting, Cindy. A very good piece!
(08-18-2011, 07:28 PM)OCLittleFlower Wrote: [ -> ]I wish I could do this, but I wasn't given a saint's name at Baptism.  Do I just use my confirmation saint?

Yep, but are you sure you don't have a Saint's name. A lot of common names are actually derived from a Saint's.
(08-18-2011, 04:05 PM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-18-2011, 03:59 PM)Cindy Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-18-2011, 03:16 PM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: [ -> ]Please don't create posts simply pasting from other websites!  If you have someone you want to say, quote the relevant part and make your comments.
I quite enjoyed this article and thought I'd share.

Well, there goes my participation here.
See, I post novenas or post what I believe is relevant from other sites......
because I trust Priests and Saints writings and comments much more than I do my own.
God bless you.

LOL you don't have to leave on my account (!!),  but it's more helpful and better etiquette to write: "Here's a link to an article I liked, here's why I liked it."

Posting reminders for novenas is also very helpful.

But if I were to post everything I read and liked on this forum, I would clog it up.

newyorkcatholic,
helpful and better etiquette to do the "me" thing?
"I" liked this article and here's why "I" liked it, huh?
These are writings of the Saints...or at least from folks a whole lot holier and wiser than I will ever be.
Who cares about my opinion.....some articles speak for themselves.

Also I don't think  it would be such a bad thing if you did clog up this forum with things you have read and liked.
Now since you average 6.811 posts per day, the chances of you clogging it up may be iffy.
My average is 0.177, so chances of me clogging it up are nil.
I do thank you for your advice.

God bless you
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