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The aging population of the United States and European nations is the “true origin of the current economic crisis,” according to the president of the Vatican Bank, Ettore Gotti Tedeschi. “The costs of an aging population cannot be sustained by young people, who, in addition to being fewer, might also ask themselves why they should do so, especially if they are immigrants.”
To ignore our aging population is dangerous and it has become unavoidable to define a strategy to concretely support families in their natural vocation to have children. Only in this way can a real economic recovery be triggered. Often a two-income family today earns less than the same family thirty years ago earned with only one income. This is mainly a result of the growth of taxes precisely as a means of absorbing the financial consequences of aging due to the decrease in births. “In the end, nature itself teaches us that if a man and a woman do not generate children it is difficult that someone takes care of them when they age. The State can try, but at a very high cost.”1
In the same context, the United States bishops “strongly oppose” a proposal to mandate coverage of surgical sterilization and all FDA-approved birth control in private health insurance plans nationwide. “Pregnancy is not a disease, and fertility is not a pathological condition to be suppressed by any means technically possible,” said Cardinal Daniel DiNardo of Galveston-Houston.
The committee of the Institute of Medicine mandated by the Human Health Resources recommended “the full range” of federally approved contraceptives and sterilization procedures, including the abortion-inducing drug Ella. It would probably also recommend mandatory coverage for surgical abortions, if such a mandate were not prevented by law.
The cardinal added: “I can only conclude that there is an ideology at work in these recommendations that goes beyond any objective assessment of the health needs of women and children,” and for its part, the Institute of Medicine “missed an opportunity to promote better health care for women that is life-affirming and truly compassionate.”
In simple words, the Church authorities rightly advocate what nature clearly encourages. Welcome children in your families as God wants them: they will turn out to be a blessing for all of society. Do not use medicine which prevents fertility; it not only goes directly against nature but also the Hippocratic Oath presumably taken by doctors.


Padre Pio in the confessional

Let us take to heart the refreshing, although not so diplomatic, words of St. Padre Pio. He explained that abortion is not only homicide but suicide: “You would understand this suicide of the human race if with the eye of reason you could see the ‘beauty and joy’ of the earth depopulated by children, burnt as a desert.” To a penitent who confessed of having provoked abortions, he exclaimed: “Go, away, animal! Go away!”2 To another who excused his faults since he received advice from “doctors who said we could procreate a monster”, the saint replied: “You would have deserved it!”


Thank God, many are not tempted to abort their children. But this last quote of Padre Pio is especially interesting because the saint's anger was also strongly directed against the sin of contraception. Is there not a danger for many to fall victim to a contraceptive mentality at times? Do many wish perhaps they could decide for themselves how many children to have? Is there not a tendency to carefully avoid conception in conjugal relationships without the grave reasons which could excuse one to do so? Let us remember to trust in God and His Providence; He knows what is best for us...
Footnotes
1 Cf. an editorial of July 21, 2011 at www.osservatoreromano.va, titled: “Economic strategy for the oldest countries: Children are the engine of recovery”.
2 The Angelus, April 2011.
Interesting idea. But I've had the impression based on personal experience that there are too many young people, like myself, all applying for the same jobs.


Also, I don't see how Padre Pio running someone out of the confessional for confessing any sin, no matter what it is, is a good thing.
(08-22-2011, 08:40 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]Also, I don't see how Padre Pio running someone out of the confessional for confessing any sin, no matter what it is, is a good thing.

It's not a good thing, and I wonder if it's even true.
(08-22-2011, 08:40 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]Interesting idea. But I've had the impression based on personal experience that there are too many young people, like myself, all applying for the same jobs.


Also, I don't see how Padre Pio running someone out of the confessional for confessing any sin, no matter what it is, is a good thing.

People also create jobs. With the assumption that our aborted and contracepted brothers and sisters (especially those that would be in their 30's, 40's, 50's), that some of them were job-creators, maybe we would have competed better against economies like China's.

I also think the potentially doubling of the workforce, with women entering it in huge numbers all at once, was a wonderful gift to big business, keeping wages low, and making it harder for single-income households to make it. Some of us do, but there are sacrifices Smile

Also, the not buying American, and not encouraging jobs to stay here. I had a friend who told me it was "unAmerican" not to buy at Walmart, since they were the best Capitalists.  He told me that once, but I argued back that America was about freedom, including economic freedom, and if I want to buy things from small business it was my right... and he let it go.

I guess I am saying contraception and abortion are likely part of our economic mess, but not all of it.
(08-22-2011, 09:11 PM)mlwalker1972 Wrote: [ -> ]People also create jobs. With the assumption that our aborted and contracepted brothers and sisters (especially those that would be in their 30's, 40's, 50's), that some of them were job-creators, maybe we would have competed better against economies like China's.

I'm just referring to the apparent situation that we now have a surplus of college-educated Americans but not nearly enough middle class jobs for them all to fill. It's why we have college graduates working as gas station attendants and retail clerks. The higher-paying jobs that are open usually require so-and-so years of experience, which can't be obtained by said graduates since they can't get experience in anything other than operating cash registers.

If we have these problems now with a contracepted population, I don't see how they'd be gone if I were living in an alternate universe where Vatican II never happened and there were five times as many people, all still applying for the same jobs. On the contrary, it just looks like more competition.


To draw an example, the Black Death in medieval Europe was actually a good thing for those peasants who survived. Since able-bodied workers were much more scarce, the survivors had a lot more leverage to use against the nobility for increased pay, or to leave the land entirely and head for the city.
(08-22-2011, 09:10 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-22-2011, 08:40 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]Also, I don't see how Padre Pio running someone out of the confessional for confessing any sin, no matter what it is, is a good thing.

It's not a good thing, and I wonder if it's even true.

Padre Pio had the gift of reading souls. This means he could tell whether someone was sincere in their confession or not. When someone was not sincere in their confession he would run them off and then these people finally came back and made a sincere and good confession. It's far better than the "Oh that mortal sin isn't really a sin now!" you get from the Newchurch now.

(08-22-2011, 09:35 PM)Petertherock Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-22-2011, 09:10 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-22-2011, 08:40 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]Also, I don't see how Padre Pio running someone out of the confessional for confessing any sin, no matter what it is, is a good thing.

It's not a good thing, and I wonder if it's even true.

Padre Pio had the gift of reading souls. This means he could tell whether someone was sincere in their confession or not. When someone was not sincere in their confession he would run them off and then these people finally came back and made a sincere and good confession. It's far better than the "Oh that mortal sin isn't really a sin now!" you get from the Newchurch now.

There are all kinds of stories about Padre Pio running people out of the confessional. The more famous one is when he ran the woman out because he could see that her neglect was the reason her two sons were in hell. Would you really want to tell a mother that her sons were in hell? I personally don't believe it because, even though there's no mention of absolution and no names are disclosed, I still think there is something to be said for the privacy of a confession.

Quote: To a penitent who confessed of having provoked abortions, he exclaimed: “Go, away, animal! Go away!”2 To another who excused his faults since he received advice from “doctors who said we could procreate a monster”, the saint replied: “You would have deserved it!”

Did the penitents reveal this to the public? Or was it Padre Pio? Either way, it seems incredible. Maybe other people saw him running people out of the confessional once or twice. But are the specifics something to be discussed? We don't have public penance anymore.
(08-22-2011, 10:11 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-22-2011, 09:35 PM)Petertherock Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-22-2011, 09:10 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-22-2011, 08:40 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]Also, I don't see how Padre Pio running someone out of the confessional for confessing any sin, no matter what it is, is a good thing.

It's not a good thing, and I wonder if it's even true.

Padre Pio had the gift of reading souls. This means he could tell whether someone was sincere in their confession or not. When someone was not sincere in their confession he would run them off and then these people finally came back and made a sincere and good confession. It's far better than the "Oh that mortal sin isn't really a sin now!" you get from the Newchurch now.

There are all kinds of stories about Padre Pio running people out of the confessional. The more famous one is when he ran the woman out because he could see that her neglect was the reason her two sons were in hell. Would you really want to tell a mother that her sons were in hell? I personally don't believe it because, even though there's no mention of absolution and no names are disclosed, I still think there is something to be said for the privacy of a confession.

Quote: To a penitent who confessed of having provoked abortions, he exclaimed: “Go, away, animal! Go away!”2 To another who excused his faults since he received advice from “doctors who said we could procreate a monster”, the saint replied: “You would have deserved it!”

Did the penitents reveal this to the public? Or was it Padre Pio? Either way, it seems incredible. Maybe other people saw him running people out of the confessional once or twice. But are the specifics something to be discussed? We don't have public penance anymore.

Who's sins a priest retains are retained.  Why would confession be any good if sinners without a contrite hard couldn't be turned away?
My uncle once confessed a sin so horrible the priest came out of the confessional, grabbed him by the collar, and threw him right out of the church. 

The sin? Missing mass four Sundays in a row. 
(08-22-2011, 10:32 PM)Someone1776 Wrote: [ -> ]My uncle once confessed a sin so horrible the priest came out of the confessional, grabbed him by the collar, and threw him right out of the church. 

The sin? Missing mass four Sundays in a row. 

What the hell?
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