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Apparently I fell off of the turnip truck late, but what is with the fad of Latin rite deacons wearing just the stole? Has this been a long time NO thing and I just missed it. A deacon at my old parish dressed like this all the time. I mean, if the priest can at least buy a cheapo polyester  chasuble, can't a deacon get a matching dalmatic? Wearing just the stole looks so low church.
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I don't really understand why, but the bishops usually instruct the permanent deacons to only wear the dalmatic for more solemn occasions like feasts and such.  Why every Sunday doesn't count I have not idea.

example:

POLICY ON APPROPRIATE ATTIRE AND TITLE
DIACONAL ATTIRE
A. The ordinary attire for permanent deacons is that of a layman.
B. When deacons assist in celebrations of Mass:
It is for the bishop or priest presiding to determine whether the deacon(s) assisting him should wear only a stole or also a dalmatic.
It is recommended that dalmatics be worn only at times when a greater degree of solemnity is in order and that they be provided by the diocese or parish (cf. GIRM #338).
Stoles and dalmatics should at least compliment, if not match, the chasuble of the presider.

C. When deacons preside in liturgical celebrations such as baptisms, weddings, funerals and Communion services, dalmatics approved by the pastor may be worn.
D. When deacons do not exercise a ministerial role in a liturgical celebration, they should not vest or occupy a specific place in the liturgy, unless they are participating as the order of deacons, e.g., at the ordination or funeral of a permanent deacon.
E. PermanentdeaconsareauthorizedtoweartheRomancollaronlywhen,for security reasons, identification as Catholic clergy is necessary, e.g., if so required for hospital or prison ministry.

That's from the San Diego Bishop

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=2&ved=0CFwQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.diocese-sdiego.org%2Fhandbook%2FHandbook_PDFs%2FDeacons4.pdf&rct=j&q=deacon%20attire&ei=6WxYTu72KMPkiAK5gvjPCQ&usg=AFQjCNGma-sRN7OexOqedRe9lQYrjMzlsw&cad=rja

Maybe they didn't what people to mistake them for priests.  :shrug:
Thats because the NO is chaotic as far as order that unless you realy makes it clear to whom is whom most people will not know, care or care to know.
The novus ordo just doesn't give a Damn.
There are two primary reasons:

First, the parishes are being cheapskates. Some deacons are expected to buy their own dalmatics if they want to wear them. (Nonetheless, that is probably a good idea for all deacons who have spare income.)

Second is an example of how clericalism is still kicking in the post-Vatican II Church. Deacons are clerics too, but often not treated as such by the higher clergy. They are instead little more than volunteers.
My archdiocese has its first class of Permanent deacons that started this year.

They all wear chasubles just like the priest-- not a proper dalmatic.  Probably because the parish has extra chasubles and no dalmatics.
(08-27-2011, 10:18 AM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]My archdiocese has its first class of Permanent deacons that started this year.

They all wear chasubles just like the priest-- not a proper dalmatic.  Probably because the parish has extra chasubles and no dalmatics.

Wow, both the Seattle archdiocese and my Spokane diocese ordained their first classes in the 1980's.  I believe Spokane is ordaining 15 this summer.  In the Spokane diocese it is starting to have an impact on the phenomena of “pant suits running the parish”.

As for the dalmatic, it's true that I don't normally see it worn except on special occasions, and I have heard of deacons having to supply their own albs and stoles.  The_H_K I think sums it up: parishes don't have them and don't want to spend the $, and the diaconate is still not always appreciated for the major order that it is.

Though … at my former parish, where I was the business manager for 3 years (1999 – 2002) we had the standard “1980's polyester bed sheet” chasubles with matching (or not) uber wide stoles (too often worn on top of the chasuble rather than under it).  My second year our newly ordained parochial vicar arrived fresh from the North American College in Rome, with a more traditional (not traditionalist) and proper attitude.  He lamented the available liturgical garb in the parish.  Shortly after that conversation a woman doctor in the parish came by my office after morning Mass and handed me a $1,000.00 check “for something the parish needs, like new vestments”.  I walked down the hall to the parochial vicar's office (the pastor had gone out to breakfast after Mass) and handed him the check.  He  informed me that while wonderful, “a thousand” didn't go very far in the procurement of liturgical vesture.  He was a very personable priest and people liked him and I gave him some names of other parishioners he might speak to.  I likewise approached the Altar Society and the Knights of Columbus, who came through, as they usually do.  I think we put together $7-8 k.  In the fall Father was going to visit the North American College for some event and while in Rome he ordered from one of the many small tailoring shops around the Vatican a chasuble, two  priest's stoles, two dalmatics, two deacon's stoles in white, green, red, and and purple (the parish did have a nice set of gold vestments, including two dalmatics and a cope).

Interestingly, when the first set arrived (purple, in time for Lent ~ Italian tailors don't move quickly) it was realized that we had neglected to tell the pastor about them  ;D .

Today at that parish is is almost always a deacon at Sunday Masses (3 English, 4 Spanish) and he is vested in a dalmatic matching the priest's chasuble.
Money is a factor, but the major reason is that they don't care about the liturgy, and also when they do care, they are woefully ignorant about the liturgy.

The dalamtic is what the deacon wears.  Without the dalmatic, **he is not vested for Mass**. Period.  Are you a poor parish in the midst of persecution in the middle of Nigeria?  Ok, go ahead without a dalmatic.  In the middle of a war zone?  Ok.  Are you a suburban parish that can afford to buy all sorts of sappy devotional junk to clutter up the now unusable side altars?  **Well then you can afford dalmatics.**

If he isn't going to wear a dalmatic because it's not Mass, he should wear the deacon's stole *over the surplice.*  Not over the alb.  Of course everyone has somehow forgot this, and even priests run around in alb and stole instead of surplice and stole, looking like low-church fools.

(Exception: if a priest is going to do something *right before Mass*, like blessing with a relic or Asperges, or *right after* like benediction, then of course he will have stole over the alb, and also a cope if needed.)
Newyorkcatholic, there is no hard distinction between the alb and the surplice in the Novus Ordo rites.

I actually prefer the alb. The surplice is like an oversized t-shirt while the alb is a full dress shirt.
(08-27-2011, 03:45 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]Newyorkcatholic, there is no hard distinction between the alb and the surplice in the Novus Ordo rites.

I actually prefer the alb. The surplice is like an oversized t-shirt while the alb is a full dress shirt.

Ok, but the way I see it (and I think the way the Church has always seen it), is that the alb is for Mass ... to cover the priest's street clothes up before he dons the stole etc.  The amice helps with the covering up.

The surplice is for choir dress or other ceremonies.  It's not really a matter of preference -- that's what the surplice is.  Whenever I see just an alb with no cope and no chasuble, I think "incomplete."

I wonder if you would prefer the floor-length albs that were used (and still are maybe) in England?  I think the shorter and shorter almost waist-length albs are more of a Roman style.
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