FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums

Full Version: pay to pray
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
i am in montreal canada and i noticed that there is an admission fee to go to the notre dame basisilica.
they have turned the basilica into a den of thieves. my sister wanted to pray to st anthony but in order to go in you have to pay a mandatory 5 dollar fee. you dont have to pay to see the no.
is it a house of prayer or a house of thieves. a family of 5 pay25 dollars to visit the church. is that against canon law?
I would think that it is a tour or something you have to pay for.

Is the Church used as a place of worship?  If no mass is celebrated there then it would be ok to charge people to see it, like a museum.

I highly doubt this is a fully functioning church that won't open it's doors to someone who doesn't ante up.
Unfortunately, the majority of people going into these churches are tourists coming to see the art and architecture rather than to pray.  Charging an admission fee is reasonable for these people.  Those people who only want to pray can do so elsewhere where there is no charge.
we did not go in there for a tour but just to pray. we had to pay nonetheless
(08-28-2011, 05:57 PM)a83192 Wrote: [ -> ]we did not go in there for a tour but just to pray. we had to pay nonetheless

The policy is based on what the majority do, not on the exceptions.
Mithrandylan Wrote:I would think that it is a tour or something you have to pay for.

Is the Church used as a place of worship?  If no mass is celebrated there then it would be ok to charge people to see it, like a museum.

I highly doubt this is a fully functioning church that won't open it's doors to someone who doesn't ante up.

Notre Dame Basilica in Montreal is still active as far as I know.

It's a beautiful church and I'm sure many non-Catholics want to see it:

[Image: 2VJEb.jpg]

I think it may be sending the wrong message to everyone if someone is standing at the door requiring $5 for admission. I know people just wanna go in and take pictures but there are people like the OP who just want to pray.

Cathedrals shouldn't be made into attractions in my opinion.
I really want to know more.  Surely if they have mass at a particular time you don't have to pay?  If so, that's simony plain and simple.  But I'm guessing they have designated hours (and they may even be the majority of hours) that would be considered something like "visiting" hours wherein a person must pay admission.

Like it's a theme park. 

Good idea- anybody wearing a scapular can get in free of charge.

Good idea, right?
They do the same thing here with Canterbury Cathedral.  Catholics built it, Protestants stole it at the Reformation.

It is about 30 miles from where I live so I regularly take visitors there Catholic and non-Catholic alike for a gawk.  The trick is to tell them you are a pilgrim and have walked from London.  Then they let you in for free.  Obviously you wear appropriate footwear and have a small backpack.

Same deal with Westminster Abbey.  You find a Catholic Saint who is buried there and tell them you have made a pilgrimage to pray at their grave and then you don't have to pay the admission fee.

It is considered bad form to charge pilgrims.  Might be some ancient English Law prohibiting it.

Besides, why should I pay those dirty low-down protestants any money?
(08-28-2011, 06:55 PM)ggreg Wrote: [ -> ]They do the same thing here with Canterbury Cathedral.  Catholics built it, Protestants stole it at the Reformation.

It is about 30 miles from where I live so I regularly take visitors there Catholic and non-Catholic alike for a gawk.  The trick is to tell them you are a pilgrim and have walked from London.   Then they let you in for free.  Obviously you wear appropriate footwear and have a small backpack.

Same deal with Westminster Abbey.  You find a Catholic Saint who is buried there and tell them you have made a pilgrimage to pray at their grave and then you don't have to pay the admission fee.

It is considered bad form to charge pilgrims.  Might be some ancient English Law prohibiting it.

Besides, why should I pay those dirty low-down protestants any money?

Isn't it bad form to lie about being on a pilgrimage?
Hey, it's Novus Ordo land. They make a killing on divorces (ahem, "annulments"): in America, it's 50,000 a year at $5,000 a pop.
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9