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Back in the bad old days of Catholicism (the pre-Vatican 2 era) the Catholic school system in the USA  was an excellent  thing , today it exists due to the dangers at many public schools, which parents don't want their children involved in and as a good education compared to public schools. In the pre-Vatican 2 era there wasn't this rivalry between parochial and public schools, the reason being that the era was generally moral and public schools didn't try to undermine the family and morals as they do today. But the Catholic School system had an army (and i mean army) of Religious teaching sisters who not only taught reading , writing (penmanship) phonics and arithmetic  but also included teaching not only about the catholic faith, but also about the moral values fundamental to the salvation of your soul. Honesty and character were also emphasized and this was from  the lowest grades up to the 8th grade. The cost of a Catholic school education was very cheap because the religious sisters worked for free, living in the convent on the grounds. Today lets pray that girls will be unselfish and join teaching orders such as the the Dominican Sisters of Ann Arbor, Michigan or the Dominicans of Nashville both of which are getting lots of vocations. When people see nuns walking around town or in school with the habits they become very joyed remembering those days of yesterday which can become tommorrow.
The Catholic School system was setup because local governments insisted it violated the separation of Church and State (then not binding on local governments) to acknowledge the complaints of Catholics about Protetsant indoctrination in public schools...

True story. 
It wasn't just religious sisters who taught in schools.  The Salesians and the Jesuits come to mind as religious brothers and priests who also taught in Catholic schools.

That said, the phrase "all politics is local" can apply here: all parochialism is local.  In my end of my city, the public schools are top notch growing districts that are safe and successful. So Catholic schools set themselves apart not by being the alternative to failing public schools, but by providing a Catholic education side-by-side with an academic education.

That hasn't stopped some Catholic schools from being crummy at Catholicism, of course.  But I think you paint with too wide a brush.
(08-31-2011, 09:09 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]It wasn't just religious sisters who taught in schools.  The Salesians and the Jesuits come to mind as religious brothers and priests who also taught in Catholic schools.

That said, the phrase "all politics is local" can apply here: all parochialism is local.  In my end of my city, the public schools are top notch growing districts that are safe and successful. So Catholic schools set themselves apart not by being the alternative to failing public schools, but by providing a Catholic education side-by-side with an academic education.

That hasn't stopped some Catholic schools from being crummy at Catholicism, of course.  But I think you paint with too wide a brush.

Just curious WRC, how many religious or priest teach at your Catholic school?

When I graduated from my Catholic High School at the turn of the millennium about 10% of the faculty were religious or priests (actually priest...we just had one priest on the faculty). 
To troll...

Really?  These are the same great Catholic schools that "educated" the mass majority of Catholics who participated in the Council, right?  The same ones that barely passed on any education so that the second things got rough, over half of the practicing Catholics jumped ship?  The same ones who were taught to roll over and accept heresy and bullshit when shoveled into the throats of the faithful?  The ones who were educated and complacent in the introduction of a banal, on the spot, novelty creation? 

I call bullshit.
But yeah, we do need religious teaching and serving the parishes.

Also, tuition was cheap/free because Catholics actually donated to their parish.  Unlike now, where they "can't" afford to donate because they mortgaged their house, and have to pay for 5000 channels on cable, the twenty cell phone plan (where they buy the latest one each year), or go ahead and put in a new hot tub.
(08-31-2011, 09:11 PM)Someone1776 Wrote: [ -> ]Just curious WRC, how many religious or priest teach at your Catholic school?

When I graduated from my Catholic High School at the turn of the millennium about 10% of the faculty were religious or priests (actually priest...we just had one priest on the faculty). 

Our teaching faculty is about 50 teachers, one of whom is a fully habited Franciscan sister.  We've had closer to 15% of our faculty as religious sisters, but this particular order seems to transfer their sisters around pretty often.  I don't know why, but orders are orders. The faculty was a smaller size then, too.

I think that everyone would like more.  But that's what we've got today.
(08-31-2011, 09:19 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]To troll...

Really?  These are the same great Catholic schools that "educated" the mass majority of Catholics who participated in the Council, right?  The same ones that barely passed on any education so that the second things got rough, over half of the practicing Catholics jumped ship?  The same ones who were taught to roll over and accept heresy and bullshit when shoveled into the throats of the faithful?  The ones who were educated and complacent in the introduction of a banal, on the spot, novelty creation? 

I call bullshit.

Did you see the movie Doubt!?

I assure sisters like Sister Aloysius existed and they did not roll over and teach heresy. 
(08-31-2011, 09:19 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]To troll...

Really?  These are the same great Catholic schools that "educated" the mass majority of Catholics who participated in the Council, right?  The same ones that barely passed on any education so that the second things got rough, over half of the practicing Catholics jumped ship?  The same ones who were taught to roll over and accept heresy and bullshit when shoveled into the throats of the faithful?  The ones who were educated and complacent in the introduction of a banal, on the spot, novelty creation? 

I call bullshit.

I didn't live at the time, but this has to be asked: if Catholic education was so great in the U.S. in the 1950's, why did everything suck after the Council? Indeed, those teaching sisters went above and beyond the Council reforms in most places.


I believe there are two reasons why there may never be a renaissance of religious vocations at our current rate, even among traditional and conservative Catholic culture:

1.) For men, because of the belief that if you're gonna be celibate, you might as well be a priest. This has been around since before Vatican II, for sure. It's a utilitarian viewpoint, but in an era when many communities have trouble even getting a priest for Sunday Mass, it may sadly be a justifiable position. Therefore, there isn't much incentive to be a mere brother.

2.) For women, there's a lot of emphasis these days (within trad and neo-Catholic culture both) on how great it is to be a mom and have kids. I get a sense that in the "old days", marriage and childbearing was simply a default state in life which didn't come with much of today's pep talk on things like the sanctity of motherhood and all the romantic notions. It was just taken for granted. Also, if I'm not mistaken, religious life is no longer seen as an easy ticket to higher education. So if religious life is great, but married life is also great, married life wins out the vast majority of the time.
(08-31-2011, 09:42 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-31-2011, 09:19 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]To troll...

Really?  These are the same great Catholic schools that "educated" the mass majority of Catholics who participated in the Council, right?  The same ones that barely passed on any education so that the second things got rough, over half of the practicing Catholics jumped ship?  The same ones who were taught to roll over and accept heresy and bullshit when shoveled into the throats of the faithful?  The ones who were educated and complacent in the introduction of a banal, on the spot, novelty creation? 

I call bullshit.

I didn't live at the time, but this has to be asked: if Catholic education was so great in the U.S. in the 1950's, why did everything suck after the Council? Indeed, those teaching sisters went above and beyond the Council reforms in most places.


I believe there are two reasons why there may never be a renaissance of religious vocations at our current rate, even among traditional and conservative Catholic culture:

1.) For men, because of the belief that if you're gonna be celibate, you might as well be a priest. This has been around since before Vatican II, for sure. It's a utilitarian viewpoint, but in an era when many communities have trouble even getting a priest for Sunday Mass, it may sadly be a justifiable position. Therefore, there isn't much incentive to be a mere brother.

2.) For women, there's a lot of emphasis these days (within trad and neo-Catholic culture both) on how great it is to be a mom and have kids. I get a sense that in the "old days", marriage and childbearing was simply a default state in life which didn't come with much of today's pep talk on things like the sanctity of motherhood and all the romantic notions. It was just taken for granted. Also, if I'm not mistaken, religious life is no longer seen as an easy ticket to higher education. So if religious life is great, but married life is also great, married life wins out the vast majority of the time.

My high school was served by two different orders of sisters. One still used the habit, the other didn't.  And you could tell the difference. Every single one of those sisters in habit would straighten out every single person on this forum. Alaric, Vox, and Scipio would henceforward always be properly well behaved. Heck, they could have probably fixed 90% of the problems of the church by breakfast tomorrow if they had the power (which they would have of course declined since they were women). 

I know a lot of people here have been soured by the Sister Iwannabeapriests of the world, but not all teaching sisters were like that. Actually, most of the older people I have talked to about their experiences in Catholic schools have assured me the tough as nails sisters were the general rule.  I think the bigger problem was that religious orders just got decimated after Vatican II. 

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