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Hello,

I am new to Chesterton..

I tried to read some of his works, which is notably christian, Orthodoxy...

I just scanned a few lines and paragraphs, and hardly found that he talks about Jesus, the Catholic Church, etc...

It kind of seems like a general works to me, instead of Catholic Apologetics.

Or maybe I am wrong..

Can somebody explain to me why Chesterton is considered great Catholic writer?

In which line or paragraphs did he talk about Jesus or saving souls?

Thank you kindly
The Chesterton corpus (in many ways) is vast.  Orthodoxy is only distinctly Christian in the most general sense (it was written before his conversion to Catholicism).  Check out his The Everlasting Man and his biographies of Francis and Aquinas for more of the apologetic material.
sky1, I'm just finishing Chesterton's book on Thomas Aquinas right now. He wrote it after converting, and places the Catholic Church in such high regard that it's an essential read. He compares the materialistic Protestants and the mystical Orthodox with "our guys", deciding that Thomas embodies the spirit of Christianity (with his mix of spiritual and material) perfectly, which is what Catholicism does. It's a really grand work...  ;D
I adore Chesterton's The Everlasting Man, which is one of the finest arguments in favor of the Faith produced in the 20th century. The book's purpose is to make the case for the Faith.

But, his approach is his own.

And when I first started looking at his writing I had a mixed sort of reaction. I have a wretched lack of patience in general and Chesterton takes his time getting to his point and also maybe it just wasn't time so I set it aside.

But when I went back and picked his writing again, specifically with The Everlasting Man, I fell in love. The book is outstanding. I found that I was able to enjoy the path of Chesterton's thought and as much how he arrives at his point as the point itself -- his perspective and writing truly are unique and a gem.

Please note, I linked to a specific edition of the book. Some books while claiming they're unabridged are grossly truncated for instance cutting out the introduction (which is critical to the book and a joy to read) out entirely.
I completely understand your initial reaction to Chesterton, KG.

Lots of long, seemingly run on sentences, to the modern reader. I plowed through it though, not understanding a good deal as I was kind of young at the time. But the parts I did understand were electric.

As I matured, I read it a few more times.

But, if you will excuse the Eastern expression, "the teacher will arrive when the student is ready".
Chesterton has written thousands of articles and essays.  The description of "vastness" certainly does him justice.

As has already been mentioned, The Everlasting Man is probably the most apologetical work of his dealing with theology.  But there are other areas for apologists to fight in.  Economics and politics etc., and in Belloc's case, history.

Even Chesterton's Father Brown stories are apologetical; giving insight into evil and humanity from a Catholic viewpoint.
Thanks for the replies  :)

I just read The Everlasting Man, as suggested...

This work does endeed mention Jesus in the Betlehem, and Christmas

I kind of enjoy reading his arguments where he compared Catholicism with Confucianism, or Buddhism. Made me proud of being a catholic.

Although have to say, his words are sometimes hard to follow

(09-08-2011, 03:22 PM)sky1 Wrote: [ -> ]Thanks for the replies  :)

I just read The Everlasting Man, as suggested...

This work does endeed mention Jesus in the Betlehem, and Christmas

I kind of enjoy reading his arguments where he compared Catholicism with Confucianism, or Buddhism. Made me proud of being a catholic.

Although have to say, his words are sometimes hard to follow

His style can take some getting used to.  He is, in the end, a Victorian-era writer.  Also, unless you are familiar with the period, some of his jokes can be hard to understand.

May I suggest that you read Joseph Pearce's biography of Chesterton?  I find that I have a much better understanding of the man's works now that I have some knowledge of his life.
I have not read G.K.'s biography nor any of his biographers works, but I will someday.

As was stated earlier you will find apologetics in his fiction as well. Can't think of a work of his fiction that I have read that does not.

A must read in this area is The Man Who Was Thursday. Also check out some of his short story volumes such as The Poets and the Lunatics and The Paradoxes of Mr. Pond. I found the reading of his fictiob to help in understanding his non-fiction.