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Full Version: Where can I listen to more singing like this?
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The first :50 seconds of this video...what kind of singing is that? Is it considered chant? If not, what is it so that I can find more of it? Any CD/iTunes recommendations for me?

Thanks.

Friend, I would have answered sooner but the internet went off...

Western music has developed steadily since 600 AD.

From 600-1100 it was basically one line floating in the air: chant. If more than one sang, they all sang exactly the same notes; no harmony. It's called monophony (single/alone+sound).
From 1100-1300 a time of experimentation began, whereby one voice sang a long "drone" under the old chant. It created the first harmony.
From 1300-1600 voices and different melodies were added, based on each other, for many voices to sing at the same time.
From 1700-today we generally have moved towards one melody supported by harmonies underneath, called homophony (one+sound): your typical rock song or famous piano piece with accompaniment.

As drones and other voices were added and became more complicated, counterpoint (notes "versus" one another) was created; today we call it polyphony (many+sound). What you gave us is polyphony from the mid-Renaissance, around 1530. It isn't as highly developed as Palestrina, who died in 1594, and who is generally considered the highest master of this style, rocketing music up to places of beauty the human heart had not thought possible to reach. Look for Palestrina (there are thousands of CDs of his music), Lassus/Lasso, and Josquin des Prez (often just called Josquin). Palestrina and Lassus passed on in the same year, and Josquin in the 1520's.

Here's an example of monophony (one melody, no accompaniment or harmony)



Polyphony (many "melodies", interweaving to create basic consonances and dissonances):



This is Homophony, for the most part (one melody, but "padded" and surrounded by harmonic chords underneath):

(09-08-2011, 07:42 PM)Laetare Wrote: [ -> ]Friend, I would have answered sooner but the internet went off...

Western music has developed steadily since 600 AD.

From 600-1100 it was basically one line floating in the air: chant. If more than one sang, they all sang exactly the same notes; no harmony. It's called monophony (single/alone+sound).
From 1100-1300 a time of experimentation began, whereby one voice sang a long "drone" under the old chant. It created the first harmony.
From 1300-1600 voices and different melodies were added, based on each other, for many voices to sing at the same time.
From 1700-today we generally have moved towards one melody supported by harmonies underneath, called homophony (one+sound): your typical rock song or famous piano piece with accompaniment.

As drones and other voices were added and became more complicated, counterpoint (notes "versus" one another) was created; today we call it polyphony (many+sound). What you gave us is polyphony from the mid-Renaissance, around 1530. It isn't as highly developed as Palestrina, who died in 1594, and who is generally considered the highest master of this style, rocketing music up to places of beauty the human heart had not thought possible to reach. Look for Palestrina (there are thousands of CDs of his music), Lassus/Lasso, and Josquin des Prez (often just called Josquin). Palestrina and Lassus passed on in the same year, and Josquin in the 1520's.

Thanks a lot for this. This is exactly what I was looking for.