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(09-20-2011, 07:59 PM)Someone1776 Wrote: [ -> ]It's a bit lame that the NO Easter Vigil has more readings than the the revised TLM Easter Vigil...

Are you sure? If what you say is true, that's enraging.

Then again, the NO Sunday Mass does have more readings than the TLM Sunday Mass. (I know the selections themselves, or rather how they are chosen are inferior, but being familiar with the Old Testament is more important today than ever. Notice that "new atheist" apologists, for example, use the Old Testament as a beating stick for unknowledgeable Christians quite frequently.)
(09-20-2011, 08:05 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-20-2011, 07:59 PM)Someone1776 Wrote: [ -> ]It's a bit lame that the NO Easter Vigil has more readings than the the revised TLM Easter Vigil...

Are you sure? If what you say is true, that's enraging.

Then again, the NO Sunday Mass does have more readings than the TLM Sunday Mass. (I know the selections themselves, or rather how they are chosen are inferior, but being familiar with the Old Testament is more important today than ever. Notice that "new atheist" apologists, for example, use the Old Testament as a beating stick for unknowledgeable Christians quite frequently.)

Yep. I am looking at my father's NO missal right now.  The NO Easter Vigil has 9 readings. 

And the TLM does have more old testament readings than you think.  The introit, gradual, offertory, and communion and  are usually passages from the Old Testament.  In addition the lessons from the Ember Days and ferias of Lent are Old Testament readings. 
(09-20-2011, 08:13 PM)Someone1776 Wrote: [ -> ]Yep. I am looking at my father's NO missal right now.  The NO Easter Vigil has 9 readings. 

Huh.

Quote:And the TLM does have more old testament readings than you think.  The introit, gradual, offertory, and communion and  are usually passages from the Old Testament.  In addition the lessons from the Ember Days and ferias of Lent are Old Testament readings. 

I know that. However, the Propers are from the Psalms more often than not. Yes, that's the Old Testament, but I was referring more to our frequent ignorance of Biblical history and why God was apparently angrier in the old, old, old days. Perhaps the Old Testament lessons were excised from the liturgy a long time ago for the sake of brevity, or because they didn't seem quite so relevant anymore in a thoroughly Christianized age. I don't know, but if those were the reasons, they certainly don't apply anymore. (And no one attends the Office anymore, so that doesn't count either.)
(09-20-2011, 08:19 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-20-2011, 08:13 PM)Someone1776 Wrote: [ -> ]Yep. I am looking at my father's NO missal right now.  The NO Easter Vigil has 9 readings. 

Huh.

huh?
More than I thought there would be, that's all.
(09-20-2011, 07:59 PM)Someone1776 Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-20-2011, 07:58 PM)NOtard Wrote: [ -> ]I wish they had 12 readings for the Easter vigil even for the NO Mass.

It's a bit lame that the NO Easter Vigil has more readings than the the revised TLM Easter Vigil...

I don't know if I remeber the pre-Vatican II Easter vigil or not. It's not the sort of thing my family would have gone to, usually. But I THINK I remember going once. My experience with the Easter vigil has been totally using the Novus Ordo Missae. So you guys can stop reading here if you want.

That said, ...

I LOVE the Easter Vigil. The haunting heard-once-per-year music sung by the deacon, the psalms after the readings, and most especially the solemn Easter Alleluia. The readings going through all of salvation history, from creation to the crossing of the Red Sea to Abraham to the prophecies of the coming of Christ. Indeed, "this is the night". The lighting of the Easter candle from the new fire. The baptisms and receptions into the Church of the new Catholics.

I feel very disappointed when any of the optional readings get left out, or if they change the music. Or, horibile dictu, the parish we used to attend where the choir director said in all seriousness "No, we won't be doing a solemn Alleluia, we'll be doing a joyful Alleluia" -- presumably not even knowing what I meant.

What happened at Easter is so important that we worship on Sundays every week precisely because Easter happened on a Sunday. I certainly don't mind at all spending 2 1/2 hours at the Easter vigil Mass, and would gladly spend even longer, although I understand that that could be a problem for people bringing younger children.

... You may now return to your regularly scheduled discussions. Sorry for the interruption.
NOtard, I feel the same way.

I'd say the Easter Vigil ought to be celebrated at the full length and solemnity, all the time. It should be expected that only the most hardcore will attend, along with the catechumens. I don't know why one would bring unruly kids to it rather than one of the much shorter Masses on Easter Sunday morning.
OK, let's sort the men from the boys: who wants the Easter Vigil back on the Saturday morning?
(09-20-2011, 08:57 PM)archdiocesan Wrote: [ -> ]OK, let's sort the men from the boys: who wants the Easter Vigil back on the Saturday morning?

Oh, goodness. Say what you will about the Holy Week revisions, pro or con.... but I don't know how the Church ever tolerated having the Easter Vigil on Saturday morning. That's like having Christmas midnight Mass on Christmas Eve morning.
I can see this being a big problem. As more VCII saints are canonized, how are you going to, on the one hand revere them, who annihilated Tradition and the Mass you attend, and also be Traditional and pray the Traditional Mass? More conciliar schizophrenia.
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