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Explain why or why not.
You shouldn't because the Devil won't try to steal what is not his. 
If a child is in critical danger of death isn't it our duty to try everything we can to baptize them, even if it is against their parents will?

How would that be considered a sin...
I shouldn't have focused on kids in the poll; that was too specific.

I will soon be in a position over people who might be at their hour of death. I figure that most older people have been baptized but with the rate of parents raising pagan children at it's highest level in 1,000 years, I'm figuring that many kids aren't baptized.

(11-16-2011, 12:00 AM)Servire Deo Wrote: [ -> ]I shouldn't have focused on kids in the poll; that was too specific.

I will soon be in a position over people who might be at their hour of death. I figure that most older people have been baptized but with the rate of parents raising pagan children at it's highest level in 1,000 years, I'm figuring that many kids aren't baptized.

Older people usually have a choice and they can desire and seek Baptism.

People past the Age of Reason need faith in Christ in order to be saved, without faith the Baptism will not grant them eternal salvation.

(11-16-2011, 12:08 AM)K3vinhood Wrote: [ -> ]
(11-16-2011, 12:00 AM)Servire Deo Wrote: [ -> ]I shouldn't have focused on kids in the poll; that was too specific.

I will soon be in a position over people who might be at their hour of death. I figure that most older people have been baptized but with the rate of parents raising pagan children at it's highest level in 1,000 years, I'm figuring that many kids aren't baptized.

Older people usually have a choice and they can desire and seek Baptism.

People past the Age of Reason need faith in Christ in order to be saved, without faith the Baptism will not grant them eternal salvation.

I know that. If I tell them the basics (Trinity, Incarnation, etc.) and they accept, they can be saved though baptism.

Never mind that, let's go back to focusing on kids.
St. Thomas Aquinas Wrote:The children of unbelievers either have the use of reason or they have not.  If they have, then they already begin to control their own actions, in things that are of Divine or natural law.  And therefore of their own accord, and against the will of their parents, they can receive Baptism, just as they can contract marriage.  Consequently such can lawfully be advised and persuaded to be baptized.

If, however, they have not yet the use of free-will, according to the natural law they are under the care of their parents as long as they cannot look after themselves.  For which reason we say that even the children of the ancients "were saved through the faith of their parents."  Wherefore it would be contrary to natural justice if such children were baptized against their parents' will; just as it would be if one having the use of reason were baptized against his will.  Moreover under the circumstances it would be dangerous to baptize the children of unbelievers; for they would be liable to lapse into unbelief, by reason of their natural affection for their parents.  Therefore it is not the custom of the Church to baptize the children of unbelievers against their parents' will.

-- Summa Theologiae, III, q. 68, art. 10, corpus.

http://www.newadvent.org/summa/4068.htm#article10
(11-16-2011, 12:17 AM)SouthpawLink Wrote: [ -> ]
St. Thomas Aquinas Wrote:The children of unbelievers either have the use of reason or they have not.  If they have, then they already begin to control their own actions, in things that are of Divine or natural law.  And therefore of their own accord, and against the will of their parents, they can receive Baptism, just as they can contract marriage.  Consequently such can lawfully be advised and persuaded to be baptized.

If, however, they have not yet the use of free-will, according to the natural law they are under the care of their parents as long as they cannot look after themselves.  For which reason we say that even the children of the ancients "were saved through the faith of their parents."  Wherefore it would be contrary to natural justice if such children were baptized against their parents' will; just as it would be if one having the use of reason were baptized against his will.  Moreover under the circumstances it would be dangerous to baptize the children of unbelievers; for they would be liable to lapse into unbelief, by reason of their natural affection for their parents.  Therefore it is not the custom of the Church to baptize the children of unbelievers against their parents' will.

-- Summa Theologiae, III, q. 68, art. 10, corpus.

Are you sure that applies to children in serious danger of death?

They likely will not make it to the age of reason, thus the child would never lapse into unbelief.
We have a moral obligation to baptize a child who is in danger of death. Otherwise, it's not allowed.
Fellow Fishie Vivace sent me a PM containing the following:

Code of Canon Law (1917) Wrote:Canon 750

§1. An infant of unbaptized parents can be lawfully bap­tized, even despite the objection of the parents, if the danger of death of the infant is such that it may be prudently judged the child will die before it comes to the use of reason.

§2. Provided there is guarantee for the Catholic bringing up of the child, an infant may be licitly baptized even though there is no danger of death:

1° if the parents or guardians, or at least one of them, consent;
2° if there are no parents (i.e., father or mother, grandfather or grandmother) or guardians, or if they lost the right to the custody of the child, or cannot in any way exercise that right.

I think this settles the issue.
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