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       It is mentioned that from time to time, the Trinity is hinted at in the Old Testament. One of the most used passages to show this is the following (I wonder if it is rendered different in Hebrew?):
 
"...et ait faciamus hominem ad imaginem et similitudinem nostram et praesit piscibus maris et volatilibus caeli et bestiis universaeque terrae omnique reptili quod movetur in terra. (...and he said: Let us make man to our image and likeness: and let him have dominion over the fishes of the sea, and the fowls of the air, and the beasts, and the whole earth, and every creeping creature that moveth upon the earth.)(Gen.1:26)" *Brennus, feel free to correct me if I did not highlight the correct verb-ending on, "faciamus"
 
       This passage is supposed to hint at the pularity of persons in the Holy Trinity. However, in the Koran we read:
 
"Celebrated be the praises of Him who took His servant a journey by night from the Sacred Mosque to the Remote Mosque, the precinct of which we have blessed, to show him of our signs! verily, He both hears and looks..."
 
       Now we know the Koran is not inspired (at least by God...). In fact, this is a good verse to highlight how Mohammed kept changing his mind. This Sura was probebly written when he was still trying to court the Jews. Anyhow, the Mohammedians are unitarians. Was not the pronoun, "we," being used as a sign of power. Could this be the same reason it was used in the Bible? Similiar to how some English monarchs, or even our own popes used the word, "we," in relation to themselves?
 
       Of course, no matter how that partiuclar issue works out, we always have the command of Our Lord Assending into Heaven.
Mohammad had access to the Torah and used it as a framework to make his own religion it is no surprise therefore to find similarities and hints at certain things that are Catholic rather than Muslim. This is why Hilliare Belloc considered Mohamedism a heresy because it was partly based on Catholic/Jewish teaching and traditions which Mohammed was almost certainly exposed to.
I may be mistaken, but I do not believe the Koran was supposed to be inspired by God, directly -rather, the Angel Gabriel, through regular communications with Mohammed whilst he meditated in a cave.

Hence the "Us"?
Credo Wrote:       It is mentioned that from time to time, the Trinity is hinted at in the Old Testament. One of the most used passages to show this is the following (I wonder if it is rendered different in Hebrew?):
 
 
Nope.  It's the plural.  For that matter, the usual word used for "God" in the Hebrew (over 2,000 times) is actually a plural word (elohim) meaning "gods," but yet it's used in a singular manner.
 
I'm not entirely sure myself who the "us" is.  It may be a legitimate interpretation to read the Trinity back into that passage, but I would not at all say that this is what Moses meant when he wrote it - the Trinity was not revealed until after Christ.
 
There does seem to be this idea of a "divine council" in Heaven, however.  There is this strange passage in 3 Kings:
 
Quote: I saw the Lord sitting on his throne, and all the army of heaven standing by him on the right hand and on the left: And the Lord said: Who shall deceive Achab, king of Israel, that he may go up, and fall at Ramoth Galaad? And one spoke words of this manner, and another otherwise. And there came forth a spirit, and stood before the Lord, and said: I will deceive him. And the Lord said to him: By what means? And he said: I will go forth, and be a lying spirit, in the mouth of all his prophets. And the Lord said: Thou shalt deceive him, and shalt prevail: go forth, and do so. (3 Kings 22:19-22)
 
And at the Creation, there is this statement:
 
Quote: Where wast thou when I laid the foundations of the earth? ... When the morning stars praised me together, and all the sons of God [i.e., angels] made a joyful melody? (Job 38:4, 7)
 
So perhaps the "us" referred to in Genesis is the "divine council," the angels who serve in the court of God?
If the people of the OT didnt believe in the Trinity, which person of God did they believe in (I would presume not the Son)?
StThomasMore Wrote:If the people of the OT didnt believe in the Trinity, which person of God did they believe in (I would presume not the Son)?

They believed in one God, the Father, the almighty, the maker of Heaven and Earth.  Their basic creed is found in Deuteronomy 6:4, "Hear, O Israel, the Lord, your God, the Lord, is one."
 
God had revealed Himself to them primarily as Creator and as Husband.  It was with the coming of Christ that God was revealed primarily as Father, a Father who sent His Son, and who would send the Holy Ghost.
Credo is correct.  It's called royal plural, most Indo-European languages have this distinction, including Latin, which is why even to the present day in the Latin you will find the Pope addressing himself in the plural.
Avalonik Wrote:I may be mistaken, but I do not believe the Koran was supposed to be inspired by God, directly -rather, the Angel Gabriel, through regular communications with Mohammad whilst he meditated in a cave.

Hence the "Us"?

 
       As I understand it, the Koran is held to be the literal word of Allah. Word-for-word, the Koran is supposed to be the laid-down the will of Allah. For this reason, a translation of the Koran is at best considered a, "retelling," and is not used in public worship and prayers. Only Arabic will do. If only the NO took this ecumenical cue...
It was supposedly delivered by the Archangel Gabriel, but he gave God's words. But the Holy Ghost spake thus through St. Paul: "for Satan himself transformeth himself into an angel of light" (ipse enim Satanas transfigurat se in angelum lucis). And what did ille angelus lucis do, but give words to Mohammed which contradict God's revealed truth? Including, but not limited to, denying that Christ died on the cross? That is why the Quran is very probably Satanic, in the sense that Satan is its author.