FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums

Full Version: Dealing with Racism
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2
This is a serious subject, but as this is a trad forum with members all over the age of reason, we should be able to handle it.

I grew up in a poor, Filipino household. For some reason or another, people in my family were (and some still are) racist. The worse is anti-white racism. Since we were poor and non-white, many problems were blamed on white people. "Oh, they think they're better because they're white." The same thing went with rich people, Republicans, and basically all non-Filipinos.

I was taught to "always vote democrats, they're for the poor" and to never vote for the rich Republican cowboys. If anyone was "Asian," it was implied that they could basically be trusted.

Many in my family were also anti-Black, but I don't know why.

Basically, anyone outside of a small ethnic group, as well as if they weren't lower middle class, was seen as untrustworthy. My family did not consist of trads or even "conservatives" until my tradversion 5 years ago. I went to high school, made friends from all economic, ethnic, and religious background, and have travelled the world, realizing that many people exhibit these same thoughts, simply substituting their group.

Most importantly, my traditional Catholic faith forced me to realize that the Faith determined my biggest family, and also to abandon unfounded racist views. We don't need to be politically correct, and life experiences and observations can cause us to form opinions and stereotypes, good or bad, but I am not racist.

Did anyone else deal with anything like this? That this type of music, was, say, "black" or "white" music? Although I really hate racism, but some things you're taught are really hard to rid from the mind. Maybe its because of where I live, the liberalism, and the rat race mentality.
Racism is not just a Black/White issue, people discriminating against others due to skin color and ethnic origin is found in EVERY culture. It's part of man's FALLEN nature, he must use his intellect to fight against it. Of course  "do-gooders" and politicians add fuel to the fire by taking sides one group over another. Some examples are Quebec where French and English fight one another, Cuba where light skin cubans and black skinned cubans duel, the American Indians fought against each other and only seem united today because they are under the rule of the American state. So this is nothing unusual, people should discriminate on a person's morals not on his appearance.
(01-23-2012, 05:27 AM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: [ -> ]Did anyone else deal with anything like this?

Dealing with racism in oneself or in others? What exactly is one dealing with here?

As others have said, it's everywhere.  My husband's grandmother got flack in the Philippines for being half-Chinese and having a Chinese last name.  She eventually married and had a Spanish-sounding name but she still looks Chinese.  Here in the states, my in-laws made good for themselves financially -- but they also raised their kids with the "you have to try harder than the lazy white man" mentality.  Their focus on the material has lead to them letting go of the faith a bit and they say things about "white people" -- which bothers my husband, since I'm white.

I think there are many forms of prejudice at work in the world, CP.  When things go wrong for people, they want to blame "them" -- whatever people outside their own group they can find.  It's the white people's fault.  It's the black people's fault.  It's the rich people's fault.  It's all a giant game of "point the finger."  The whole Occupy movement is based on "blame the rich people."

As far as how to deal with it -- I'd just question it outright when people try to impose stuff on you.
(01-23-2012, 05:27 AM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: [ -> ]This is a serious subject, but as this is a trad forum with members all over the age of reason, we should be able to handle it.

I grew up in a poor, Filipino household. For some reason or another, people in my family were (and some still are) racist. The worse is anti-white racism. Since we were poor and non-white, many problems were blamed on white people. "Oh, they think they're better because they're white." The same thing went with rich people, Republicans, and basically all non-Filipinos.

I was taught to "always vote democrats, they're for the poor" and to never vote for the rich Republican cowboys. If anyone was "Asian," it was implied that they could basically be trusted.

Many in my family were also anti-Black, but I don't know why.

Basically, anyone outside of a small ethnic group, as well as if they weren't lower middle class, was seen as untrustworthy. My family did not consist of trads or even "conservatives" until my tradversion 5 years ago. I went to high school, made friends from all economic, ethnic, and religious background, and have travelled the world, realizing that many people exhibit these same thoughts, simply substituting their group.

Most importantly, my traditional Catholic faith forced me to realize that the Faith determined my biggest family, and also to abandon unfounded racist views. We don't need to be politically correct, and life experiences and observations can cause us to form opinions and stereotypes, good or bad, but I am not racist.

Did anyone else deal with anything like this? That this type of music, was, say, "black" or "white" music? Although I really hate racism, but some things you're taught are really hard to rid from the mind. Maybe its because of where I live, the liberalism, and the rat race mentality.

Being half Filipino and half Korean, I can attest to what you're saying.

For Filipino's, I think the "racism" is a bit more subtle. Remember, Americans are heroes to the Filipinos. When the Japanese invaded the Philippines, it was the Americans that came to their rescue. General McArthur is still a legend in the Philippines; there are statues of him everywhere. (funny side story: my great aunt met Gen. McArthur and at the time, she did not know English. She said that he said "yeah" a lot and the way he said it, along with the frequency, made him sound like some sort of animal). So I think that Filipinos hold Americans to such high standards that they get disappointed by the stuff they see this generation doing. If Filipino children did some of the stuff they do on television here in the States, the whole village/neighborhood would shun the family (not trying to sound racist).

As for Koreans, I think the biggest problem is that they feel Americans have a lack of respect for their elders. In cultures like Korea, China, and Japan, they all have ways of addressing their elders, even if they've known them for a long time. And I'm not just talking about titles, like grandpa or aunt; I'm talking about the manner that they speak to them...it's kind of submissive. For example, my Korean mother taught me to never look elders or superiors in the eyes when I'm talking to them. I still don't to this day because of habit. Go to a deli or restaurant run by Koreans and watch how they take something from you i.e. credit card for payment. They will grab it with both hands and do a slight bow. My best friend, for example, lives in an apartment complex that has a higher than usual population of Asians. The other day he asked me why they seemed so rude to him when he would say hello. I told him what I just told you, and I suggested that instead he say "good afternoon" and give a slight bow. Yesterday I talked to him and he said that my advice worked; they smiled back at him, gave a slight bow, and said "good afternoon."

Is it fair? Not really. It's just different. Then there could be the whole jealousy thing, but that's another argument.
Turn the principles back on themselves. No one likes to be judged the way the racist judges others. It helps defeat the us and them mentality. Martin Luther King Jr. was right about the quality of one's character. If being Filipino is perfect, then why are there bad Filipinos, and why are the Philippines not heaven on earth? We all have strengths, we all have weaknesses. Being Filipino is an accident of history if you really think about it.
(01-23-2012, 05:27 AM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: [ -> ]Most importantly, my traditional Catholic faith forced me to realize that the Faith determined my biggest family, and also to abandon unfounded racist views.

I really liked this line.  The word "catholic" means universal.  Our Church transcends all racial and national boundaries.  My brothers and sisters in the Faith live all over the world and are of every skin colour.
I think that much of what is called racism is actually the mortal sins of envy and/or anger at work.
(01-23-2012, 03:37 PM)alphonsusjr Wrote: [ -> ]I think that much of what is called racism is actually the mortal sins of envy and/or anger at work.
I don´t think it has been defined correctly.
I will give you a practical example:
In Mexico, when in conversation. When someone refers to a black man he is called "un negro".
It is not seen as offensive. It is not seen as racist. It is accepted.

Even president Fox 10 years ago said on National TV " Que los Mexicanos hacen los trabajos que ni los negros hacen".
(That the Mexicans do the jobs that not even black men do".
In spanish it is not said with any tone of anger or offense. It is just the way it's said.
It passes on from generation to generation.

They don't change to wording to sound "less offensive" from negro to Africano- americano (that just doesn't exist in the spanish lingo).

Once we were crossing the border and the Customs agent (who was a black man) was scanning our passports et al, and one of my sons said in spanish to my wife, "Ese oficial negro es muy cortes". (Trans. That black officer is very  courteous). The officer looked at my son, then he looked at me and said, "I understood what your son said. Please tell him not to say that word in the US.  It is labeled as a racist slur. But I understand that your son does not know this. Don't worry".

So I had to brush up on the translations of the racially profiled words per se.
Apparently,  Only in the US, does this situation apply. I have been to Central America, (Costa Rica and El Salvador), it's commonplace to hear that reference to black people. (No, they aren't african-american).

Now the new trend in Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic is to refer to blacks as "morenos". Moreno means "darkish".
I mean darkish because that is what in Mexico is referred to as any person who is moreno. i.e. many many mexicans. Many are morenos "not white nor light skinned". You know, your typical stereotyped mexican. The short fat guy with the brush and the sombrero. He is not a black man, but he is definatley no white. Moreno.

So definition is very important.
my take is that in the US, they went overboard and is not about race, it is about politics.






OC Littleflower is right. There are elements of "us against them" and viewing people who are different with suspicion everywhere, in all cultures.

I can relate to what DaMooster said. I don't like how many Filipinos like to emulate Americans and American culture. The rich Hispanic-Filipino culture has been nearly forgotten, especially since WWII.

Jackson K. Eskew is not that far off the mark, Scriptorium. Many of these things are because of pride "we're better than them," rash judgment "if. X group of people is always viewed as criminals, they're all criminals" and other sins due to Original Sin.

Tapatio, I understand what you are saying because I am Mexican as well. Negro literally means a black man, or black, but since the slur in the US is derived from the Romantic-Latin word, anglophones don't really get it.

Too much emphasis has been given to race, but it's been like that for centuries. I appreciate that the current situation in the Church has allowed for a very culturally and racially diverse "trad" population. I know from almost every racial group. In the old days, most of us would have just stayed in our local neighborhood parish, which is not a bad thing, but a different experience than now.
Pages: 1 2