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It is the opinion of the Catholic world that the Philippines is one of the last three countries (after the Vatican and East Timor) to remain faithful to the Faith (i.e. no divorce, no contraception, no abortion).  Not so.  When I came back here in 2009 after 40 years abroad I found very little of the vibrant Catholicism I knew when I left.  At that time everybody and his brother was Catholic, not only CINO but a practicing one as well.  When I left there was a smattering of the false faiths, a few protestant churches, Mohammedanism, et al.  Not so anymore.  Protestant missionaries are sending "missionaries" everywhere to convert the poor lost souls of Catholics.  What happened to the shepherds?  Where are they?  I have met quite a few people who have told me they haven't gone to confession since their First.  No sense or guilt of sin anymore.  True, the churches are bulging with attendance -- SRO only on Sundays.  No altar boy girls.  Communion in hand, yes.  On Wednesdays, the Redemptorist Church in Baclaran is attended by hundreds of thousands for the Novena to Our Mother of Perpetual Help.  It is to her that trads turn to for the redemption of the faith.

On another note, the Philippines celebrates and declares official holidays to various non-Catholic "feasts" (e.g., several Islamic days, etc).  Last Monday, the Chinese New Year was observed officially by the schools, businesses, gov't entities.  What for?  To celebrate the Year of the Dragon.  Yes, the Dragon spoken of in Daniel and in the Book of the Apocalypse.  Is there any other that goes by the name "Dragon"?    The Year of the Dragon. Its significance throws a scare at me because there is no Dragon but the one who is the sworn enemy of Christ and His Blessed Mother. 


And there was a great dragon in that place, and the Babylonians worshiped him.
--Daniel 14:22

[7] And there was a great battle in heaven, Michael and his angels fought with the dragon, and the dragon fought and his angels: [8] And they prevailed not, neither was their place found any more in heaven. [9] And that great dragon was cast out, that old serpent, who is called the devil and Satan, who seduceth the whole world; and he was cast unto the earth, and his angels were thrown down with him.
--Apocalypse 12

Can you share more about how it was back in the day?

I asked my grandma if it got bad with her generation, or was it already like that before she left. She told me, in the 1950s, plenty were already non-religious. But I guess it had to be better in 1969.
(01-26-2012, 08:20 AM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: [ -> ]Can you share more about how it was back in the day?

I asked my grandma if it got bad with her generation, or was it already like that before she left. She told me, in the 1950s, plenty were already non-religious. But I guess it had to be better in 1969.

I was in grade school in the 50s.  I was, let say. fortunate that I went to Catholic school.  Many went to public school which was secular but the parents always considered themselves Catholic except they were not financially able to afford the private tuition charged by the Catholic schools. I don't know where your grandmother lived (which province) and it might have been that in that place Catholics were not as serious in practicing their faith but I can allow that wherever it was there were only two non-Catholic churches existing -- the Aglipayan (ex-Catholic priest severing himself from the Church, mostly for political reasons) and the Iglesia ni Kristo (the local Mormonic type of faith).  I never heard of Baptists or Lutherans or Methodists, et al., being as prominent as they are now.  I didn't even know they existed.

It was toward the mid  60's when things started to turn around.  The Philippine Communist Party was born, student dissidents from the universities (think:  Berkeley, etc.) started to crop up, and Marcos seized the day and declared Martial law.  Of course Vatican II had just concluded and the modernists turned hijackers started to take over, though it would still take sometime before it blossomed into what we see today.

Being pressed for time, I'll write more in detail (perhaps through PM if that's ok with you).
A PM is fine, Vincentius. My grandmother (and all of my Filipino family) is from San Francisco del Monte, Quezon City.
(01-26-2012, 11:44 AM)Vincentius Wrote: [ -> ]It was toward the mid  60's when things started to turn around.  The Philippine Communist Party was born, student dissidents from the universities (think:  Berkeley, etc.) started to crop up, and Marcos seized the day and declared Martial law.

"...Russia will spread her errors."
Vincentius except for Ferdinand Marcos that is the story of my times here in Chicago.

tim