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Full Version: Reminder -- Ember Days
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Just so you know, Graham: this year, the Annunciation is transferred to the 26th of March, since the 25th is a Sunday. :) You can remove a blue dot from your calendar!
(02-20-2012, 01:08 PM)shin Wrote: [ -> ]Hmm, are you sure those are the correct days?

Sorry for the typo -- March 3, Saturday.

A note in passing -- used to be that all days in Lent were partial abstinence days, except where noted as full abstinence.  Most traditional ordos (and calendars show this) while others do not.  Anybody know which tradition to follow? 
Vincentius: it's up to you how trad you want your fast to be.  Why not the Cistercian beer fast?  :-)

Graham: You could always give up fish (or at least only eat simple seafood) for most of Lent and then on those feast days have Lobster.

Or if you want to have meat, that's fine, you're okay by the new Code.
I want to mention that at my workplace, where most everyone is not Catholic, people are impressed by and respectful of my Lenten observance. It was the same way last year as well. I believe many of them have this impression that Christianity consists in hypocrisy and moral self-righteousness so they are taken aback when a Christian just quietly and happily starves himself for a while. I think it's a formidable witness to our faith.

I'm afraid, though, that I may have caused a minor scandal yesterday. It was the company's "birthday" celebration, and cake was brought in at around 3 PM. I'd already decided, in good conscience, that I would break my fast for a slice of cake on this occasion. In compensation I'd made sure that my lunch snack beforehand was truly puny. I was trying not to be pharisaical and inflexible, however I suspect a few people interpreted it as me caving in to temptation, judging by a few comments they made about God being angry that I broke my fast. Perhaps I should not have eaten anything.

(02-21-2012, 10:57 AM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: [ -> ]Graham: You could always give up fish (or at least only eat simple seafood) for most of Lent and then on those feast days have Lobster.

Or if you want to have meat, that's fine, you're okay by the new Code.

I'm under the impression that meat has always been acceptable on partial and feast days. No? I'm just trying to go by the FE article.
(02-25-2012, 01:26 PM)Graham Wrote: [ -> ]I'm afraid, though, that I may have caused a minor scandal yesterday. It was the company's "birthday" celebration, and cake was brought in at around 3 PM. I'd already decided, in good conscience, that I would break my fast for a slice of cake on this occasion. In compensation I'd made sure that my lunch snack beforehand was truly puny. I was trying not to be pharisaical and inflexible, however I suspect a few people interpreted it as me caving in to temptation, judging by a few comments they made about God being angry that I broke my fast. Perhaps I should not have eaten anything.

My boss's birthday is in March and we usually go out to celebrate so I have my main meal at lunch on those days. Same thing for the Christmas party, which invariably falls on an Ember day. You could remind them that charity involves not imposing your penances on others, and you can offer up not being able to fast as a sacrifice. My coworkers know I don't eat meat on Fridays and even after two years I feel like every Friday that rolls around they say "Oh we can't eat there. She won't be able to order anything," no matter how many times I tell them they can enjoy their burgers and pepperoni pizza while I have a salad and fries. Berkeley has lots of vegetarian options anyway.
(02-25-2012, 06:21 PM)piabee Wrote: [ -> ]My boss's birthday is in March and we usually go out to celebrate so I have my main meal at lunch on those days. Same thing for the Christmas party, which invariably falls on an Ember day. You could remind them that charity involves not imposing your penances on others, and you can offer up not being able to fast as a sacrifice.

I'll tell them that if I get a chance. I tried to explain it to some of them yesterday after the angry God remark, but I didn't put it as well as you did. I started talking about 'pharisaical legalism' and got blank stares.

Quote:My coworkers know I don't eat meat on Fridays and even after two years I feel like every Friday that rolls around they say "Oh we can't eat there. She won't be able to order anything," no matter how many times I tell them they can enjoy their burgers and pepperoni pizza while I have a salad and fries. Berkeley has lots of vegetarian options anyway.

I think that's nice. They're thinking about you. It can be awkward at my office because the boss is a liberal Catholic and doesn't follow any of these practices. To give credit where it's due he's strongly against abortion and isn't afraid to hang a cross in the reception or ask a blessing before a business lunch.
(02-25-2012, 07:04 PM)Graham Wrote: [ -> ]I think that's nice. They're thinking about you. It can be awkward at my office because the boss is a liberal Catholic and doesn't follow any of these practices. To give credit where it's due he's strongly against abortion and isn't afraid to hang a cross in the reception or ask a blessing before a business lunch.

Yeah I'm pretty lucky (or blessed I should say). I just think it's funny that they make deal out of it then I do. I've observed the Friday abstinence my whole life so I don't even think about it. All of my coworkers are nominal Catholics or were at least raised Catholic. One of them follows the Lenten Friday abstinence, so that's nice.
(02-20-2012, 03:45 PM)piabee Wrote: [ -> ]
(02-20-2012, 02:49 PM)Pheo Wrote: [ -> ]But actually feasts didn't cancel out the Lenten fast under the 1917 Code

This varied depending on the diocese. Dispensations from the fast could be given for the feast day of the patron saint of the diocese, like St. Patrick's in the SF archdiocese.

Interesting. So this was observed even before the Council?

Question: if I can take meat once today, does it have to be at the principal meal? Or can I have it whenever I want, just once.
(03-03-2012, 03:34 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: [ -> ]Question: if I can take meat once today, does it have to be at the principal meal? Or can I have it whenever I want, just once.

The 1917 Code doesn't mention it directly since abstinence was implied on the fast days, but meat was always taken at the principal meal on days of partial abstinence (if at all):
Rev. Heribert Jones Moral Theology Wrote:§388. - II. Things prohibited by the laws of fasting and abstinence.
1. The law of fasting forbids more than one full meal a day. Meat may be taken at the principal meal on a day of fast except on Fridays, Ash Wednesday and the Vigils of Immaculate Conception and Christmas. Two other meatless meals, sufficient to maintain strength, may be taken according to each one's needs; but together they should not equal another full meal.
(03-03-2012, 05:44 PM)Pheo Wrote: [ -> ]
(03-03-2012, 03:34 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: [ -> ]Question: if I can take meat once today, does it have to be at the principal meal? Or can I have it whenever I want, just once.

The 1917 Code doesn't mention it directly since abstinence was implied on the fast days, but meat was always taken at the principal meal on days of partial abstinence (if at all):
Rev. Heribert Jones Moral Theology Wrote:§388. - II. Things prohibited by the laws of fasting and abstinence.
1. The law of fasting forbids more than one full meal a day. Meat may be taken at the principal meal on a day of fast except on Fridays, Ash Wednesday and the Vigils of Immaculate Conception and Christmas. Two other meatless meals, sufficient to maintain strength, may be taken according to each one's needs; but together they should not equal another full meal.

Pheo makes an important point.  Traditionally, we as Catholics did not have meat during Lent.  I spoke with one gentleman at the parish who told me that in Portugal pre-World War II era that the salt boxes were nailed shut for Lent. 
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