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http://www.dici.org/en/news/spain-the-st...een-found/

Shocked


[Image: Notre-Dame-de-la-Victoire-de-Lepante-300x206.jpg]

Spain: The Statue of the Virgin of Lepanto Has Been Found

9-03-2012 
Filed under News, The Church in the world

Notre-Dame-de-la-Victoire-de-LepanteThe bulletin Correspondance Européenne announced in its February 28, 2012 edition (#247) that the statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary present at the battle of Lepanto has been found.

“The statue of the Blessed Virgin that was on board the royal Galley commanded by Don Juan of Austria, King Philip II of Spain’s half-brother, during the battle of Lepanto, has been found.  While Pope Pius V was back in Rome praying for the victory of the Christians, the fleet’s flagship took on the Turkish galley of the commander of the Ottoman forces, Ali Pacha, who was decapitated shortly afterwards.  The victory of the Holy League stopped the progress of the Muslim assaults in Europe, without putting an end to the coastal attacks and the capture of slaves.

“This victory won on October 7, 1571, is celebrated every year on the feast of Our Lady of the Rosary.  The Virgin of the Rosary had been offered to Don Juan of Austria by the Venetians.  The statue of the Mother of God was brought back to Spain after this great military feat over which she had presided, and Don Juan of Austria bequeathed it at his death in 1578, to the Confraternity of the Galleys in the Church of St. John Lateran at the Port de Santa María in Cadix.  In 1854, the statue was transferred to the Academy of the Marine Guards’ Midshipmen’s College in San Fernando, the ancestor of the Spanish Naval School.  It was then passed from hand to hand and its traces were lost.  It has recently been returned to the Naval Museum of Madrid where it will be restored, then exposed to the public.  Although the statue has lost one eye, it has preserved all its supernatural presence.”  (source: CE – DICI#251, March 9, 2012)
A museum... this needs to be in a chapel dedicated to it!
The statue in the photo has what looks like a life-like glass eye.  Was that a common feature in statues from that era?  Or is that just a generic stock photo?
(03-18-2012, 12:16 PM)ConceptJunkie Wrote: [ -> ]The statue in the photo has what looks like a life-like glass eye.  Was that a common feature in statues from that era?  Or is that just a generic stock photo?
Statues with like like eyes were very common during Spani during that era.
http://arttattler.com/archivesacredmadereal.html
The Philipines continues the tradition of making life like statues of saints called "Santos".
[Image: 4400405376_58680553e5_b.jpg]
[Image: 6831732880_04343aaaf6_b.jpg]
The statues I posted above are owned by individuals not by churches.
Thank you so much for these images. God bless you most abundantly.
Great news!
(03-18-2012, 12:16 PM)ConceptJunkie Wrote: [ -> ]The statue in the photo has what looks like a life-like glass eye.  Was that a common feature in statues from that era?  Or is that just a generic stock photo?

It was common at the time, and Spain achieved the highest form of the art.  Spain sent a collection over to the Smithsonian a few years back.  They are amazing.  The unique realism was a response to Ignatian spirituality, and was intended to aid the worshipper's imagination, and help the person obtain insight into the message of the saint's life. 
This is awesome. I captained Don Juan's galley in a tabletop RPG once.
(03-18-2012, 03:50 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]This is awesome. I captained Don Juan's galley in a tabletop RPG once.

Our Lady of Victory! 

Square that holiday with Assisi! 
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