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Full Version: Interesting discussion on conversion of the Visigoths and German tribes
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Interesting narrative from this Carlin. So the barbarians exhibited some restraint in the sack of the conquered because they were Catholic. This guy is so interesting I bok marked his site. Nice find and your avatar is apropos, too !
He goes on to discuss how/whether Christianity adopted some of the traits of peoples it converted after Constantine and the fall of the Western Roman Empire.

For the first 400 years Christianity was very un-war like.  Then as the warlords of the Celts and Goths and other Barbarian tribes became Christian the religion had to embrace the political reality.

Interesting food for thought.  One wonders what a Christian from 200 AD would have made of Christianity 400-800 years later.

Carlin is a top rated podcaster.  His hardcore history series is particularly good.
Long ago I read concerning the Crusades that the Teutonic Knights while coming down the Danube to join up with the other Crusaders left a wake of progroms, sacks of towns, and just plain rape and pillage. This fits the way in which Tacitus described the Germans. 

tim 
(04-02-2012, 04:00 PM)ggreg Wrote: [ -> ]He goes on to discuss how/whether Christianity adopted some of the traits of peoples it converted after Constantine and the fall of the Western Roman Empire.

For the first 400 years Christianity was very un-war like.  Then as the warlords of the Celts and Goths and other Barbarian tribes became Christian the religion had to embrace the political reality.

Interesting food for thought.  One wonders what a Christian from 200 AD would have made of Christianity 400-800 years later.

Carlin is a top rated podcaster.  His hardcore history series is particularly good.

An opinion I support 100%!
I subscribe to his Hardcore History Podcast and enjoy it very much.
The only two other podcasters (through Itunes) I enjoy as much as him, is Lars Brownworth (Byzantine Empire and The Normans) and Mike Duncan (History of Rome)
Thanks.  I'll have a listen to that tonight.  I've listened to both of these before.  They are good.
Oh goodness! I can't wait to listen to this. I've studied a bit of this from the art history side of things, but always wanted to learn a bit more. This should be a nice, simple way to increase my background in it. Thank you!
St. Isadore's history of these folks is pretty interesting. What I gathered from it is they treated the Creed as merely a politically unifying tool and the faith didn't permeate that deep into society's conscience and way of life.  The orthodox and the Arians were basically like two political parties.  If an Arian ascended to the throne, everyone in realm would become Arian and vice versa. Whole peoples would switch back and forth and back again within a single generation, and nothing really changed on a practical level. It took a while for orthodoxy to stick among these peoples and really permeate their way of life.  I've read one historian say this didn't fully happen in Europe until the Counter-Reformation, but I think that's pushing it too far. 
(04-02-2012, 04:57 PM)Tim Wrote: [ -> ]Long ago I read concerning the Crusades that the Teutonic Knights while coming down the Danube to join up with the other Crusaders left a wake of progroms, sacks of towns, and just plain rape and pillage. This fits the way in which Tacitus described the Germans. 

tim 

When German mercenaries sacked Rome in 1527, it was even worse than when Rome was sacked by the Visigoths, Vandals, and Odoacer in 410, 455, and 476 AD respectively. Nothing was spared. Altars were ransacked, the Sistine Chapel was used as a stable, nuns were raped, prelates including the future Pope Julius III were tortured, children in orphanages were butchered, and the mercenaries taunted the Pope with cries of "Long Live Pope Luther!" as Pope Clement VII wept.
The way people converted from the time of Theodosius on usually followed the same pattern: ruler converts, people forcibly convert after him.

This suited the Chuch for centuries.
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