FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums

Full Version: Is God evident in nature?
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2 3
I think that, in my life, I have been convinced of God's presence in this world through the observance of His Holy Spirit in nature. 

But also, I think that nature itself illustrates God's presence clearly for men to see. 

Yet, I have never explored this; I've only assumed it. 

So...

Is God's Presence and handiwork evident in nature?  How? 

Is it clear that it is the Christian God in nature? 
For your first question, yes. When I study the world, especially when I see the complexities of biology, chemistry, and even music, it's obvious that God designed everything. I won't go for a thesis that essentially posits that of we detonate paint in a room, we'll get the Mona Lisa.

As to you second question, prophecies and miracles are the answer and "proof" of our Faith.
(04-07-2012, 12:51 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: [ -> ]For your first question, yes. When I study the world, especially when I see the complexities of biology, chemistry, and even music, it's obvious that God designed everything...

Do you know of any specifics?  If everyone does, we can pool together a small collection.
(04-07-2012, 12:51 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: [ -> ]For your first question, yes. When I study the world, especially when I see the complexities of biology, chemistry, and even music, it's obvious that God designed everything. I won't go for a thesis that essentially posits that of we detonate paint in a room, we'll get the Mona Lisa.

I'm afraid I am not convinced by that.  Things are the way they are.  Are they designed well or does it only seem that way to us because we are adapted to them?
Yes ("Caeli enarrant gloriam Dei, et opera ejus annuntiat firmamentum").

I think biologically (because of my training) -- lots of things seem adaptive.

But why human beings adapted to the grassy Savannah and who evolved by natural selection would play Mozart piano sonatas, compose operas, build cathedrals, take religious vows ... too many things make no sense.

The "evolutionary psychological" reasons given for the activities are exceedingly lame.  Music evolving as a means of communication or something ... but Mozart?  You could say he was a fluke, but thousands of people who devote their lives to studying and playing his works?
A highly developed mind will seek stimulation.  That makes sense to me.  It really makes no sense to say something makes no sense, or doesn't fit, unless you understand all the rules of the system, and we certainly do not understand all the rules of our system.  To me the only convincing way to see God in nature as a proof is that anything exists at all (the Cosmological argument, or some variation).  Perhaps there is also something in consciousness that implies that there is something spiritual as well as physical about a human being.  But once you accept the existence of God, it is hard NOT to see him everywhere in nature.
Whenever possible read Pope St. Pius X Moto Proprio Sacrarum Antistitum
[Image: pius+x.jpg]
The paleobiologist Simon Conway Morris, known for his work on the Burgess Shale, has an interesting perspective on this involving evolutionary convergence. You might want to check out his Gifford lectures here: http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/...e-solution
Define nature. Do you mean created reality, or do you mean the outdoors, like trees and flowers?
Spend some time in Colorado.
Pages: 1 2 3