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Could anyone on here recommend a good Catholic history book or books?
(05-03-2012, 08:09 AM)WesternWarrior Wrote: [ -> ]Could anyone on here recommend a good Catholic history book or books?


Yes, "A Concise History of the Catholic Church" by Thomas Bokenkotter.
If you're looking for something wide, but not too deep, I would recommend "Church History" by Fr. John Laux -- you can pick it up from TAN: https://tanbooks.benedictpress.com/index...ch-History

While I was on their site, I noticed they have a whole history section you might want to check out -- https://tanbooks.benedictpress.com/index.php/History
Marked for later viewing.
Anything by William Thomas Walsh.
(05-03-2012, 11:54 AM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: [ -> ]Marked for later viewing.

Seconded. I'll need to get my hands on some solid Catholic history books not only for myself, but for the family down the line.

Thanks so much for the suggestions, everyone!
I happened to find these two sites that you might find some interest in.

American Catholic Historical Association
http://www.achahistory.org/

Canadian Catholic Historical Association
http://cchahistory.ca/
Thank you all for the suggestions.
I'm finding some very interesting essays at the Canadian Catholic Historical Association web site.  I imagine you'll find the same at the American version.

My Highland ancestors came to upper New York state from Scotland in 1773.  Just 27 years after their defeat at Culloden in 1746 I've always wondered why my ancestors sided with the British during the American Revolution.  I've read that it was because of the anti-Catholic bigotry of the Dutch and other settlers that were there.  But I figured it must have been more than that.  From the last paragraph of this letter I found that it wasn't the anti-Catholic bigotry but that they were monarchists.
http://www.cchahistory.ca/journal/CCHA19...Scott.html
Quote:There is another matter to which I wish to refer, before bringing this paper to a close. John Gilmary Shea suggests (40) that the attitude of these Highlanders towards the revolution was due to the effect on them of the bigotry of their American neighbours, and he adds: "Thus did antiCatholic bigotry deprive New York of industrious, thrifty settlers and send to swell the ranks of the British Army, men who longed to avenge the defeat of Culloden." (41) This remark shows, as it appears to me, a singular lack of appreciation of the character and point of view of these Highlanders. Doubtless the bigotry of their neighbours and particularly "the outburst of bigotry in New York excited by the Quebec Act" (42) would not have tended to attract them towards the cause of the revolting colonies. But bigotry was nothing new to them. They were quite accustomed to it. For more than two centuries they and their ancestors had suffered bitter persecution for conscience sake. There can be little doubt therefore, that it was not the bigotry of the Americans that determined their stand. Had there been no bigotry the result would have been the same. They would, it is true, have welcomed an opportunity of avenging Cullodenl but only in the service of the Stuarts. They were essentially monarchists and, once the Stuart cause had failed, they were as ready to fight for King George as they had been to fight for King James. They were, moreover, proud aristocrats. The remark of the wife of Collachie, in a letter to her son Alexander, congratulating him on his having, at the age of fifteen, enlisted as a private in the Royal Highland Emigrant Regiment, is characteristic. "Never forget" she wrote "that every drop of blood in your veins is that of a Highland gentleman." (43) To such people a republican revolt against the King could under no conceivable circumstances have successfully appealed.

I also found this very good essay by Rev. Edward Kelly about the Irish priest, Father John McKenna who sailed with my ancestors from Scotland to upper New York state, then went on to Canada with them after the American Revolution.  At the time he was the only priest in the entire area that spoke Gaelic.  "In most of our literature on the subject he is, indeed, "The Forgotten Man."  There were about 600 that set sail from Knoydart, Scotland on the ship called the Pearl in 1773 to end up in the Mohawk country.  This article finishes by naming 25 Irishmen besides Father McKenna that also sailed with them.
http://www.cchahistory.ca/journal/CCHA19...Kelly.html

Very interesting stuff.  And I've just got to the 1933 and 1934 essays so far.  Lots more to read.     
(05-03-2012, 09:28 AM)Ray M Facere Wrote: [ -> ]If you're looking for something wide, but not too deep, I would recommend "Church History" by Fr. John Laux -- you can pick it up from TAN: https://tanbooks.benedictpress.com/index...ch-History

While I was on their site, I noticed they have a whole history section you might want to check out -- https://tanbooks.benedictpress.com/index.php/History

This.

It's a good, broad overview.  Then, after reading it, you know the big picture and you can delve deeper into the things that interest you more.
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