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Wednesday, May 30 -- Fast and partial (or full if you prefer) abstinence

Friday, June 1  -- Fast and abstinence

Saturday, June 2 - Fast and partial (or full if you prefer) abstinence

Abstinence for those who observe the traditional law is 7 years old (14 years old for the new law)

Fast - The ecclesiatical law of fasting embodies a serious obligation on all baptized individuals capable of assuming obligations provided they have completed their twenty-first year and are not otherwise excused.  The obligation is lifted for the sick, the infirm, convalescents, delicate women, persons sixty years old and over. 
(05-27-2012, 07:59 AM)Vincentius Wrote: [ -> ]Wednesday, May 30 -- Fast and partial (or full if you prefer) abstinence

Friday, June 1  -- Fast and abstinence

Saturday, June 2 - Fast and partial (or full if you prefer) abstinence

Abstinence for those who observe the traditional law is 7 years old (14 years old for the new law)

Fast - The ecclesiatical law of fasting embodies a serious obligation on all baptized individuals capable of assuming obligations provided they have completed their twenty-first year and are not otherwise excused.  The obligation is lifted for the sick, the infirm, convalescents, delicate women, persons sixty years old and over. 
Thank you for the reminder.  :)
(05-27-2012, 07:59 AM)Vincentius Wrote: [ -> ]Fast - The ecclesiatical law of fasting embodies a serious obligation on all baptized individuals capable of assuming obligations provided they have completed their twenty-first year and are not otherwise excused.  The obligation is lifted for the sick, the infirm, convalescents, delicate women, persons sixty years old and over.

It should be mentioned, however, that the commemoration of the Ember Days as days of fasting and abstinence -- as praiseworthy as it is -- is entirely optional, and hence the faithful are no longer obliged under pain of sin to observe it. (CIC c.1251)
(05-27-2012, 11:43 AM)Steven Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-27-2012, 07:59 AM)Vincentius Wrote: [ -> ]Fast - The ecclesiatical law of fasting embodies a serious obligation on all baptized individuals capable of assuming obligations provided they have completed their twenty-first year and are not otherwise excused.  The obligation is lifted for the sick, the infirm, convalescents, delicate women, persons sixty years old and over.

It should be mentioned, however, that the commemoration of the Ember Days as days of fasting and abstinence -- as praiseworthy as it is -- is entirely optional, and hence the faithful are no longer obliged under pain of sin to observe it. (CIC c.1251)

I don't see where CIC 1251 says that or makes a dispensation.  These are Ember Days, entirely days of penitence.  Perhaps you are referring to CIC 1253, but as we have seen the laity have taken  the interpretation as an "abolishment" of the law of fast and abstinence. 
(05-27-2012, 12:21 PM)Vincentius Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-27-2012, 11:43 AM)Steven Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-27-2012, 07:59 AM)Vincentius Wrote: [ -> ]Fast - The ecclesiatical law of fasting embodies a serious obligation on all baptized individuals capable of assuming obligations provided they have completed their twenty-first year and are not otherwise excused.  The obligation is lifted for the sick, the infirm, convalescents, delicate women, persons sixty years old and over.

It should be mentioned, however, that the commemoration of the Ember Days as days of fasting and abstinence -- as praiseworthy as it is -- is entirely optional, and hence the faithful are no longer obliged under pain of sin to observe it. (CIC c.1251)

I don't see where CIC 1251 says that or makes a dispensation.  These are Ember Days, entirely days of penitence.  Perhaps you are referring to CIC 1253, but as we have seen the laity have taken  the interpretation as an "abolishment" of the law of fast and abstinence. 

No, I meant Can. 1251, which lists all days of obligatory fasting and abstinence (and does not include the Ember Days).
"Codex Iuris Canonici anni 1983" Wrote:Can.  1251 Abstinence from meat, or from some other food as determined by the Episcopal Conference, is to be observed on all Fridays, unless a solemnity should fall on a Friday. Abstinence and fasting are to be observed on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday.

. . .

Can.  1253 The conference of bishops can determine more precisely the observance of fast and abstinence as well as substitute other forms of penance, especially works of charity and exercises of piety, in whole or in part, for abstinence and fast.

Can. 1253 could be used by the Bishops to include Ember Days, but I'm unaware of any positive decision from the (United States) Bishop's Conference about such.

Again, I'm fully in favour of Ember Days and would encourage anyone to follow the traditional fast and abstinence, but I just wanted to make sure that people knew that there is no obligation under church law to do so. :)

Thanks for the reminder, Vincentius. This is the only down-side of traditional living for me. My birthday will always fall in an Embertide! Beat.
Thank you both, Vincentius and Steven.
(05-27-2012, 12:21 PM)Vincentius Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-27-2012, 11:43 AM)Steven Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-27-2012, 07:59 AM)Vincentius Wrote: [ -> ]Fast - The ecclesiatical law of fasting embodies a serious obligation on all baptized individuals capable of assuming obligations provided they have completed their twenty-first year and are not otherwise excused.  The obligation is lifted for the sick, the infirm, convalescents, delicate women, persons sixty years old and over.

It should be mentioned, however, that the commemoration of the Ember Days as days of fasting and abstinence -- as praiseworthy as it is -- is entirely optional, and hence the faithful are no longer obliged under pain of sin to observe it. (CIC c.1251)

I don't see where CIC 1251 says that or makes a dispensation.  These are Ember Days, entirely days of penitence.  Perhaps you are referring to CIC 1253, but as we have seen the laity have taken  the interpretation as an "abolishment" of the law of fast and abstinence. 

Since we're going all legal, it is incorrect that the law of fast and abstinence is binding on all baptized individuals capable of following the fast.  For the Byzantine churches, the week following Pentecost, fasting and abstinence is strictly forbidden.