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What is male spirituality or masculine spirituality? I want to see a few thoughts before I climb on my soapbox.
Maybe Spanish-like inquisitorial spirituality? Could just be me.
One that doesn't involve hugging, dancing, and ecumenical dialogue.

Glad to help.  :tiphat:
I'm a fan of (authentic) Ignatian spirituality.



I look forward to your soapbox, though.
(06-04-2012, 01:11 AM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: [ -> ]What is male spirituality or masculine spirituality? I want to see a few thoughts before I climb on my soapbox.

It looks like you already asked this question in 2008: http://catholicforum.fisheaters.com/inde...=3193642.0

C.
(06-04-2012, 08:41 AM)Cetil Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-04-2012, 01:11 AM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: [ -> ]What is male spirituality or masculine spirituality? I want to see a few thoughts before I climb on my soapbox.

It looks like you already asked this question in 2008: http://catholicforum.fisheaters.com/inde...=3193642.0

C.

Wow! I had totally forgotten about that! There were some great responses on that thread too. Quis said it was "Protestant theology." Many agreed there was no such thing as male spirituality. Well, that was four years ago. And it was pre-Voris. I think I'm overdue for a vent.  Okay.. I'm going to get on my soap box again...
Four times this week I've heard the term "male spirituality" on EWTN. This term has been used by Fr. Richard Rohr, O.F.M (an admitted feminist), Michael Voris (an admitted anti-feminist), Steve Wood of EWTN's Faith & Family, and tossed around "The Round Table" where ex football players discuss how to be better Catholic husbands and fathers.

When Michael Voris speaks of "male spirituality" he uses the Crusaders (as did another poster in that other thread) as examples because they are courageous and ready to fight for the truth. But....didn't the Muslims fight? Were not Alexander the Great, Attila the Hun, and Genghis Khan fearless and strong? I know an atheist who would run into a burning building to save his wife and kids. Do pagan men have a"masculine spirituality" too?

First, I see the above as natural bravery, not necessarily spiritual or virtuous. The fruits of the Holy Spirit are joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, long suffering, mildness, faith, modesty, continency, and chastity. The gifts of the Holy Spirit are knowledge, wisdom, fear of the Lord, understanding, counsel, fortitude, and piety. The beatitudes teach us to be poor in spirit, meek, merciful, peacemakers, and single-hearted. The cardinal virtues are prudence, justice, courage, and temperance. Are some of these for men only and some for women only? I always thought of the Holy Spirit as an equal opportunity employer.

So, I have a few more questions:

1. Is Yin/Yang considered "spirituality"?
2. Is it possible for women to have a masculine spirituality - and vice versa?
3. Do men have a distinctive, separate path to God?
4. IF there is a feminine spirituality, is it always secondary?
5. Is not the spirit of both man AND woman passive/receptive in its relationship to God?
6. Is the idea of male spirituality a result of the so-called "wounded masculinity" movement where men think the church has been feminized by feminists and pious old ladies?

I leave you with a quote that predates feminism:

[quote='Francis de Sales'] "After the publication of my Introduction to the Devout Life, a critic chided me for addressing my Introduction to "Philothea." He said men did not want to read advice given to a woman. This puzzles me. Such men are not very manly. Devotion is for both sexes. Anyway, it is the aspiring soul that I call "Philothea." Gender is not involved. Still, rather than ignore my critic, I have addressed this new work to "Theotimus." I wonder, will a woman somewhere take offense? Will she refuse to read instruction given to males? Please understand that "Theotimus" is a name I coined for the human spirit that desires to deepen devotion and progress in holy love. This spirit is found equally in women and in men" (Treatise on the Love of God).
(06-04-2012, 03:30 AM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: [ -> ]I'm a fan of (authentic) Ignatian spirituality.

I look forward to your soapbox, though.

I understand this kind of spirituality. I guess either sex could have an Ignatian spirituality, or Franciscan or Carmelite or Dominican. These various orders have charisms but I don't know what would make them masculine or feminine. Maybe I don't understand what "spirituality" is.
1. Is Yin/Yang considered "spirituality"?

Yes, in a sense. Yin/yang expresses that male and female are complementary, and that within the feminine is the masculine, and vice versa. Distinct, but complementary. In this too is the idea that male is forceful and initiative, while the feminine is yielding and receptive.

{note, taoism would say they are one spiritually [monism], but Catholicism holds that the sexes are two and separate, but complementary.)

2. Is it possible for women to have a masculine spirituality - and vice versa?

Yes. But all I see truly in these types of spirituality is an predominant appeal.

3. Do men have a distinctive, separate path to God?

No, not a separate path, but perhaps in most cases different duties and charisms.

4. IF there is a feminine spirituality, is it always secondary?


No.

5. Is not the spirit of both man AND woman passive/receptive in its relationship to God?

Yes, but the male is modeled on God Himself, while woman is modeled on the male. Both were created in God's image, but the man was intended to reflect God, while the woman was intended to reflect the man. We, however, are all receptive in relationship to God, so we all act in the feminine mode, which is symbolized by the Church and the image of the bride.

6. Is the idea of male spirituality a result of the so-called "wounded masculinity" movement where men think the church has been feminized by feminists and pious old ladies?


Yes, to an extent. Men in general want domains which are wholly masculine. A woman in the sanctuary, for instance, changed the dynamic greatly, and the men in general will leave. You might even say it is done out of deference to the woman at times. The issue is somewhat complex, but men in general need religious spaces which are wholly their own. In general this is how the sanctuary was reserved (not for these reasons, but sociologically why many men "signed up"). The problem many people have is that they see demarcation in church as an affront to liberty or equality. The Church's teachings are way to profound on these matters to conclude just that.
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