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Full Version: Freemasonic Mexican Revolution and the Cristero Martyrs
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A great sermon with great pictures.




Thanks for posting this Alex.  I have been in awe of the Cristeros and what they did ever since I read Blood Drenched Altars, written  by  the Most Rev. Francis Kelly, when I was a teen.

I believe American Catholics wouldn't have much trust for our government if they understood how complicit the Masonic elements in our government were in aiding the slaughter of our Mexican bothers and sisters in Christ.

Viva Cristo Rey!
(06-17-2012, 08:55 PM)Hawaii Five-0 Wrote: [ -> ]Thanks for posting this Alex.  I have been in awe of the Cristeros and what they did ever since I read Blood Drenched Altars, written  by  the Most Rev. Francis Kelly, when I was a teen.

I believe American Catholics wouldn't have much trust for our government if they understood how complicit the Masonic elements in our government were in aiding the slaughter of our Mexican bothers and sisters in Christ.

Viva Cristo Rey!

Also examine the revolution against Spain in the Philippines. I don't think anti-clericalism and anti-friarism is a coincidence.
(06-17-2012, 08:59 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-17-2012, 08:55 PM)Hawaii Five-0 Wrote: [ -> ]Thanks for posting this Alex.  I have been in awe of the Cristeros and what they did ever since I read Blood Drenched Altars, written  by  the Most Rev. Francis Kelly, when I was a teen.

I believe American Catholics wouldn't have much trust for our government if they understood how complicit the Masonic elements in our government were in aiding the slaughter of our Mexican bothers and sisters in Christ.

Viva Cristo Rey!

Also examine the revolution against Spain in the Philippines. I don't think anti-clericalism and anti-friarism is a coincidence.

Yep, Freemasonry played a huge part in it.  And after the Americans subjugated the PI they integrated Freemasonry into the power structure.  Unfortunately, it's such to this day. 

My brother-in-law, who is in the PNP Metro Manila Swat Unit, has had his career capped because he refuses to join the lodge.

I was at a golf course owned by Dole Corp. in Polomolok, Mindanao and every single vehicle in the parking lot had a Masonic badge on it.  The ironic thing is that Dole Corp. was founded by men who were all Masons that overthrew the Hawaiian monachy and annexed the island for the good old USofA.  Today, Hawaii has no pineapple canning; it was all moved to Polomolok, where they could get the local Pinoy to work for a pittance, back in the '80s .

Damned Masons, I can't stand em.
It's almost unheard of for a First Sergeant or Sergeant Major/Command Sergeant Major's parking spot to not have a car with a Masonic symbol on it. Tons of Masons in the Army. MANY Prince Hall in the support areas and many Scottish Rite in the combat arms. Used to be a joke for a while that if you weren't a Mason who had served in the 82nd, you weren't going to make E-8.

When I was on recruiting the Station Commander (E-7 type) was a little Filipino man. He was trying to get one of the recruiters, another E-7, who was Prince Hall, to get him in. Why? Because he knew if he got the ring he'd make E-8 list. He was already maxed out on everything else he could have done, including the Glen E. Morrell Award which is a big deal in the world of MOS 79R aka permanent recruiter aka queer scared of combat. Fuentes never let him approach the lodge because he knew he wasn't really wanting to be a Mason, just get the perks. They want you IN, not to be used by you.

My great grandfather was a Mason, though I don't remember ever hearing that he was particularly active. My great grandmother had been Eastern Star. Even as a child, looking at her old ES stuff I thought it was creepy. My parents went to one of the Eastern Star initiations as invited guests. Dad grew up in the South and Southern Baptist, so he knew plenty of Masons but had never joined. He had bounced the idea around but just felt led not to. Well, he understood why when they saw the ceremony's portion which was open to guests. He said it was downright satanic and from then on he never entertained the idea of joining.

I did a report for a senior English project on the Freemasons. What I dug up was just flat out disturbing on multiple levels. The "we'll cut out your tongue" type of stuff might seem hokey and rather "frat" today, but has roots in an era where they damn well meant it and probably still do if they could get away with it.

Pike laid their plan out pretty well. Seems to be moving right along.

Ugh, the thought made me shudder.
Quote:Also examine the revolution against Spain in the Philippines. I don't think anti-clericalism and anti-friarism is a coincidence.

My great-grandfather, Don Clemente Diago, who came and settled in the Philippines in the 1840's, became blind during the last decade of the Spanish regime. When his family heard that Dr. Jose Rizal was on his way to Dapitan for exile, Clemente was brought to him in for treatment.  

He was operated and his sight restored. Thus he had the distinction of being operated by the famous Filipino ophthamologist of the day.  It was also said that Rizal highly esteemed Don Clemente Diago, Sr. for his personal breeding and refinement so that in memory of this great admiration, Rizal carved for him several wooden pipes and served him with several pouches of the best quality of tobacco cut he brought from Spain.  In the course of Don Clemente 's sojourn in Dapitan, his daughter Casimira revealed that Rizal exclaimed: "If all Spaniards were like you, I would have written all for the glory of Catholic Spain instead of the NOLI ME TANGERE and El FILIBUSTERISMO" -- two books which incited the revolution against the despotic and tyrannic rule of Spain.  Rizal was executed in 1896, two years before the Philippines came under another despotic rule -- the US.  This time it was Protestant and masonic.
Vince,

In my limited understanding of the Revolution, Spain made fatal mistakes against the Philippines. There were many injustices, and they should not have executed Rizal, who was not in favor of independence.

As you said, they ended right in the hands of the masonic, Protestant, anti-Catholic United States.
And all their base are belong to US.

I hear Subic Bay might reopen for massive amounts of business. That place was a cesspool of sin when the Navy frequented it.
Quote:Vince,

In my limited understanding of the Revolution, Spain made fatal mistakes against the Philippines. There were many injustices, and they should not have executed Rizal, who was not in favor of independence.

As you said, they ended right in the hands of the masonic, Protestant, anti-Catholic United States.

Phil, yes, Rizal didn't want anything to do with an armed revolt but it was the ambitious revolutionaries who went ahead and used the two novels Rizal wrote against the injustices of the Spaniards as the reason for the uprising.  There were abuses to be sure and that is not to be denied but Spain did much more for the Philippines -- education (oldest university (Universidad de Santo Tomas -- Dominican) was founded some 400 years ago, older than any university in the US.  But most important was the Catholic faith, now embraced by 89% of the islanders.

The revolt against Spain was simply the ambitious plan that the leaders wanted to be the rulers, not the ruled.  When the US defeated Spain in the American-Spanish war and annexed (colonized is a better term) the country, it gave Filipinos the option to be a Commonwealth (like Puerto Rico) and statehood but it was rejected.  The leaders apparently were ambitious and desired independence and self-rule.  But me thinks, it went further than that.  With the US out of their hands, the larcenous hearts of these leaders were put into action.  Now, some hundered years later, we don't have to wonder the rampant corruption and graft taking place in the high places.  One becomes a pol here to enrich oneself.  The heck with the plight of those poor unfortunates.   That's my take and I'm just saying ....

One interesting note:  The Spanish rulers were fearful of Rizal, who was really an extraordinary man:  learned gentleman who spoke fluently 22 languages, was an artist, a medical doctor, poet, novelist.  When he was executed by firing, a second squad was present aiming their rifles at the executioners who they believed would not want to fire and kill their hero.  Rizal's last piece was a poem, Mi Ultimo Adios (My last farewell).  Google it.
(06-18-2012, 07:12 AM)Vincentius Wrote: [ -> ]One interesting note:  The Spanish rulers were fearful of Rizal, who was really an extraordinary man:  learned gentleman who spoke fluently 22 languages, was an artist, a medical doctor, poet, novelist.  When he was executed by firing, a second squad was present aiming their rifles at the executioners who they believed would not want to fire and kill their hero.  Rizal's last piece was a poem, Mi Ultimo Adios (My last farewell).  Google it.

That is indeed interesting. Though it makes me ask: why not just use the guys in the second squad to shoot Rizal?
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