FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums

Full Version: Pope talks to Knights of columbus
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
by CATHOLIC NEWS AGENCY/ EWTN NEWS 08/04/2012 Comment

In a letter signed by Vatican Secretary of State Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone, the Holy Father commended the Knights of Columbus’ work to support religious liberty at a time “when concerted efforts are being made to redefine and restrict the exercise of the right to religious freedom.”
The Knights of Columbus “have worked tirelessly to help the Catholic community recognize and respond to the unprecedented gravity of these new threats to the Church’s liberty and public moral witness,” the July 19 letter said.
In doing so, the organization “has proudly lived up to the high religious and patriotic principles which inspired its founding.”
The letter applauded the Knights’ work to defend “the right of all religious believers, as individual citizens and in their institutions, to work responsibly in shaping a democratic society inspired by their deepest beliefs, values and aspirations.
With more than 1.8 million members, the Knights of Columbus is the world’s largest fraternal group and among the nation’s most active charitable organizations. Last year, the Knights donated more than $158 million and 70 million hours to various charitable causes.
In recent months, the organization has been an outspoken opponent of measures that threaten religious freedom, most notably a federal mandate that requires employers to offer health insurance that includes contraception, sterilization and early abortion-inducing drugs, even if doing so violates their religious beliefs.
Each of the Knights’ state councils passed a resolution supporting religious freedom, and Supreme Knight Carl Anderson has written and spoken out about the mandate as well as other threats to religious liberty.
The July 19 letter said that the Holy Father was “pleased” to learn that the Knights will be holding their 130th Supreme Convention in Anaheim, Calif., Aug. 7-9.
It added that the theme of the gathering, “Proclaim Liberty Throughout All the Land,” calls to mind both “the great biblical ideas of freedom and justice” that shaped the nation’s founding and “the responsibility of each new generation to preserve, defend and advance those great ideals in its own day.”
Stressing the “urgent need” for a well-formed laity that is both engaged and articulate, the Pope voiced confidence that the Knights will continue their legacy of “providing sound inspiration, guidance and direction to a new generation of faithful and dedicated Catholic laymen.”
Pope Benedict urged the Supreme Council and each of the local councils to build up their “praiseworthy programs of continuing catechetical and spiritual formation, which have long been a hallmark of your order.”
He offered prayers that the upcoming Year of Faith will reinforce the Knights’ resolve to make their entire lives a witness to their baptismal faith.
The Holy Father also expressed gratitude for the spiritual bouquet of prayers and sacrifices offered by the Knights and their families for his 35th anniversary of episcopal ordination.
This “act of spiritual solidarity” was viewed by the Pontiff as both an “outstanding testimony of love” and a sign of “fidelity, loyalty and support during these difficult times.”
“We are honored by the Pope’s encouragement and confidence in our work,” said Anderson, adding that the Pope’s message “is clear.”
“We must continue to stand up for our religious liberty and to point the way for our fellow Catholics to do the same,” he said.
“Defense of religious liberty has long been a part of the Knights of Columbus' history,” Anderson noted, recalling the group’s work to defend Catholic education from the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s.
He vowed that the Knights “will continue to do all we can” to oppose regulations that threaten to encroach on “the first freedom guaranteed in our bill of rights: the freedom to practice our religion.”


Read more: http://www.ncregister.com/daily-news/pop...z22j5EObJd
Quote:In a letter signed by Vatican Secretary of State Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone, the Holy Father commended the Knights of Columbus’ work to support religious liberty at a time “when concerted efforts are being made to redefine and restrict the exercise of the right to religious freedom.”

Well, of course. This is in line with Dignitatis Humanae. Do we still need long dissertations on this document?
(08-05-2012, 09:57 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: [ -> ]
Quote:In a letter signed by Vatican Secretary of State Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone, the Holy Father commended the Knights of Columbus’ work to support religious liberty at a time “when concerted efforts are being made to redefine and restrict the exercise of the right to religious freedom.”

Well, of course. This is in line with Dignitatis Humanae. Do we still need long dissertations on this document?
The Knights of Columbus have championed Catholic religious liberty.
By what you mentioned to me the other day, one of your relatives was in the Cristero war. You should know it was in large part funded by the Knights of Columbus.
If you look at the banners the Cristeros used, many of them had the K of C emblem.
But I guess we forget to quickly....
 
Both the Masons and the KoC now support "religious freedom," and they both can be nominally Catholic…
(08-05-2012, 11:34 PM)Cooler King Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-05-2012, 09:57 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: [ -> ]
Quote:In a letter signed by Vatican Secretary of State Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone, the Holy Father commended the Knights of Columbus’ work to support religious liberty at a time “when concerted efforts are being made to redefine and restrict the exercise of the right to religious freedom.”

Well, of course. This is in line with Dignitatis Humanae. Do we still need long dissertations on this document?
The Knights of Columbus have championed Catholic religious liberty.
By what you mentioned to me the other day, one of your relatives was in the Cristero war. You should know it was in large part funded by the Knights of Columbus.
If you look at the banners the Cristeros used, many of them had the K of C emblem.
But I guess we forget to quickly....

The Cristeros fought for the freedom of Catholics and the Roman Catholic Church. As my grandfather told me, for "el Cristianismo, por Cristo Rey." In 1928, the Knights of Columbus did not have get togethers with Freemasons. And no Catholic supported religious freedom based on the rights of man. The error of Religious Liberty decrowns Christ the King.
I second Crusader's explaination.
I recommend that all parties interested read the following brief article, located on this thread:

http://catholicforum.fisheaters.com/inde...646.0.html
See also this recent Robert de Mattei article:
Quote:Among the slogans of “politically correct” language there is the term “religious liberty”, which is used incorrectly at times by Catholics as a synonym for freedom for the Church or freedom for Christians.  In reality the terms and concepts are different and it is necessary to clarify them. The ambiguity present in the Conciliar declaration Dignitatis humanae (1965) arose from the lack of distinction between the internal forum, which is in the sphere of personal conscience, and the public space, which is in the sphere of the community, or rather the profession and propagation of one’s personal religious convictions.

The Church, with Pope Gregory XVI in Mirari Vos (1836), with Pope Pius IX in the Syllabus and in Quanta Cura (1864), but also with Pope Leo XIII in Immortale Dei (1885) and in Libertas (1888) teaches that:


1. No one can be constricted to believe in the private forum, because faith is a personal choice formed in the conscience of  man.
2. Man has no right to religious freedom  in the public space, or rather freedom to profess whatever religion, because only the true and the good have rights and not what is error and is evil.
3. Public worship of false religions may be, in cases, tolerated by the civil authorities, with the view of obtaining a greater good or avoiding a greater evil, but, in essence, it may be repressed even by force if necessary. But the right to tolerance is a contradiction, because, as is evident even from the term, whatever is tolerated is never a good thing, rather, it is always a purely bad thing. In the social life of nations, error may be tolerated as a reality, but never allowed as a right.  Error “has no right to exist objectively nor to propaganda, nor action” (Pius XII Speech Ci Riesce 1953)


Further, the right of being immune to coercion, or rather the fact that the Church does not impose the Catholic Faith on anyone, but requires the freedom of the act of faith, does not arise from a presumed natural right to religious freedom or a presumed natural right to believe in any religion whatever, but it is founded on the fact that the Catholic Religion, the only true one, must be embraced in complete freedom without any constraints. The liberty of the believer is based on the truth believed and not on the self-determination of the individual. The Catholic and only the Catholic has the natural right to profess and practice his religion and he has it because his religion is the true one. Which means that no other believer apart from the Catholic has the natural right to profess his religion. The verification of this is in the fact that rights do not exist without responsibilities and duties and vice versa. The natural law, summed up in the ten commandments, is expressed in a prescriptive manner, that is, it imposes duties and responsibilities from which rights arise. For example, in the Commandment “Do not kill the innocent” the right of the innocent to life arises. The rejection of abortion is a prescription of natural rights which is separated from religion and whoever conforms to it. And this is the same for the seven Commandments of the Second Table. Comparing the right to religious liberty to the right to life, considering them both as natural rights, is however, nonsense.

The first three commandments of the Decalogue in fact do not refer to all and sundry divinities, but only to the God of the Old and the New Testaments. From the First Commandment, which imposes adoration of the Only True God, arises the right and the duty to profess not any religion but the only true one. This counts for both the individual and the State. The State, like each individual, has the duty to profess the true religion, also because the aims of the State are no different from those of the individual.

The reason the State cannot constrain anyone to believe does not arise from the religious neutrality of the State, but from the fact that adhering to the truth must be completely free. If the individual had the right to preach and profess publically any religion whatever, the State would have the obligation of religious neutrality. This has been repeatedly condemned by the Church.
 
For this reason we say that man has the right to profess, not any religion, but to profess the only true one.  Only if religious liberty is intended as Christian liberty, will it be possible to speak of the right to it.

There are those who sustain that we live actually in a pluralistic and secularized society, that the Catholic States have disappeared and that Europe is a continent that has turned its back on Christianity.  Therefore, the real problem is that of Christians persecuted in the world, and not that of a Catholic State. Nobody denies this, but the verification of a reality is not equivalent to the affirmation of a principle. The Catholic must desire a Catholic society and State with all his heart, where Christ reigns, as Pope Pius XI in the encyclical Quas Primas (1925) explains.

The distinction between the “thesis” (the principle) and the “hypothesis”(the concrete situation) is noted. The more that we are obliged to suffer under the hypothesis, the more we have to try to make the thesis known.  Hence, we do not renounce the doctrine of the Social Kingship of Christ: let us speak of the rights of Jesus Christ to reign over entire societies as the only solution to modern evils. So, instead of fighting for religious liberty, which is the equalizing of the true religion with the false ones, let us fight in defense of liberty for Christians, today persecuted by Islam in the East and by the dictatorship of relativism in the West.
Note that in his address on the 2011 World Day of Peace, Benedict XVI did not make a distinction between the internal and external forums in describing religious liberty as an "essential good."
Message of His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI for the celebration of the World Day of Peace, 1 January 2011 Wrote:Religious freedom is, in this sense, also an achievement of a sound political and juridical culture. It is an essential good: each person must be able freely to exercise the right to profess and manifest, individually or in community, his or her own religion or faith, in public and in private, in teaching, in practice, in publications, in worship and in ritual observances. There should be no obstacles should he or she eventually wish to belong to another religion or profess none at all.

Source: http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/benedi...ce_en.html

This appears to be problematic in light of:
Pius IX, Syllabus of Errors Wrote:15. Every man is free to embrace and profess that religion which, guided by the light of reason, he shall consider true.
78. […] it has been wisely decided by law, in some Catholic countries, that persons coming to reside therein shall enjoy the public exercise of their own peculiar worship.

I do not think those who wish to jump mental loops to reconcile Dignitatis Humanae with pre-conciliar teaching or who need to elucidate the Church's "true" teaching to "uneducated," "haughty," and "rash" laymen such as myself can do so, as even the Rev. Thomas Crean, O.P. (who cannot be dismissed as a "rad-trad" SSPXer or sedevacantist) admits in his article that his attempt of reconciliation "is a very different interpretation of Dignitatis Humanæ from the one that is commonly held."

However Crean, Harrison, or Pink interpet this document ultimately does not matter, since the words and deeds of the conciliar popes and hierarchy make it quite clear how they view religious liberty and Dignitatis Humanae.