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Full Version: L. Brent Bozell, Jr. and the Events of June 6, 1970
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In a nutshell, after a couple of court cases legalized abortion in the District of Columbia (Roe being a few years in the future), Brent Bozell and his staff at Triumph the magazine organized some kind of action/protest/rescue.  After Mass, the group led by Bozell went to a George Washington University clinic where it was met by police who proceeded to beat them up and arrest several of them.

Is this incident widely known?  Was it widely reported at the time among the nascent Trad movement?
(10-14-2012, 01:26 PM)Jacob Wrote: [ -> ]In a nutshell, after a couple of court cases legalized abortion in the District of Columbia (Roe being a few years in the future), Brent Bozell and his staff at Triumph the magazine organized some kind of action/protest/rescue.  After Mass, the group led by Bozell went to a George Washington University clinic where it was met by police who proceeded to beat them up and arrest several of them.

Is this incident widely known?  Was it widely reported at the time among the nascent Trad movement?
Local DC news was not regularly published in Econe, Switzerland.
Blush
(10-14-2012, 01:26 PM)Jacob Wrote: [ -> ]In a nutshell, after a couple of court cases legalized abortion in the District of Columbia (Roe being a few years in the future), Brent Bozell and his staff at Triumph the magazine organized some kind of action/protest/rescue.  After Mass, the group led by Bozell went to a George Washington University clinic where it was met by police who proceeded to beat them up and arrest several of them.

Is this incident widely known?  Was it widely reported at the time among the nascent Trad movement?

It was fairly well known sure. Here's a memory in a letter to the editor of New Oxford Review: http://www.newoxfordreview.org/letters.j...97-letters

C.
Heavens to Betsy thanks for that article!  This is without a doubt the first rescue. Well i will see to it that it goes to the pro life archives so it won't be forgotten by
the future generations.

Hope you don't mind but will c and p it.

Meeting L. Brent Bozell

Fr. Raymond Gawronski’s tribute to the life of L. Brent Bozell (Jul.-Aug.) got me to recollecting.

It was around suppertime on a cold winter evening in about 1980 when I got an odd and disturbing phone call at the Pax Center in Erie, Pennsylvania. “Pax” was your typical Catholic Peace ’n’ Justice center: good as any, better than some. At that time I was organizing an outfit called Prolifers for Survival, to wage protracted courtship between the peace movement and the prolife movement: “Ban the Bomb, Not the Baby” was our schtick.

The voice on the other end of the phone was ancient, masculine, raspy, and urgent. This man was calling to grill me about my stand on the various Life Issues, construed in the broadest possible way. What did I think of assassination? Euthanasia? Hiroshima? Purity? The Papacy? Poverty? Did I love Our Lady of Guadalupe? Had I ever considered suicide? Did I perchance speak Spanish?

After 15 minutes of intense questioning, the sandpaper-voiced man said he’d just have to drive over to talk more about these matters. “I could meet you for coffee sometime,” I offered, thinking: Here’s one hurtin’ buckaroo. “Where are you calling from?,” I asked. “Washington, D.C.” Oh.

Sometime after midnight there was a knock at the door. It was snowing heavily, and here was this scrawny gent, badly dressed, sockless, and somewhat slurry of speech. The Pax community did shelter and soup kitchen work at that time. I thought he was a bum looking for a place to crash. I brought him inside to give him a sandwich and coffee, and a referral to the Men’s Shelter. But there wasn’t any alcohol on his breath. And he was talking about Aquinas and the Just War Theory.

Golly, I thought. It’s the same guy. He just hopped in his car and drove all the way up from D.C. to Erie through a blizzard because he has this urgent, driving need to discuss a Catholic vision of life and death.

I finally got his name: Brent Bozell. It didn’t mean anything to me. But I could tell the Men’s Shelter wasn’t for him. I got him to bed down on our Pax Center library sofa, promising we’d have time to talk in the morning.

Morning came, and, boy, did we talk! He told me about how he and Michael Schwartz strode into D.C. General Hospital in 1970 to try to stop the abortions, and how he took a hammer and did what needed to be done to a suction machine (yes, 1970!). He heartily approved of my (more demurely) removing the hoses and screws from a suction machine during a prolife sit-in a few years after 1970. He called atomic weapons a kind of satanic sacramental, charring innocent people to smoke, an incense sweet in the nostrils of the Lowerarchy Below. He loved Humanae Vitae, loved his wife and 10 children with a reverence that made him shake, and he hated the loveless world of politics.

His body and voice seemed to be failing even then. He was a magnificent wreck: brilliant, ardent, relentless, and well-read, and yet a wreck, like a Mercedes in a ditch with a busted axle and broken glass on the seats.

He was unnervingly humble. He was here sitting at my feet almost, quizzing me and noting seriously everything I said, as if I were a font of wisdom, when his poorest, least coherent thoughts were more interesting than anything I had in my repertoire of small borrowed ideas.

We kept in touch. I eventually pieced together who this Brent Bozell is in the world of Catholic thought. I found out about Triumph magazine, and Brent’s break with his brother-in-law Bill Buckley, whom he regarded as “too liberal.” I found out that traditionalism, which I had always thought was cold, formal, and heartless, could flow like hot lyricism from a heart of love.

He was a challenge to the Right because he loved the poor, and wanted, like Peter Maurin, to be with them, to look like them, to serve them. He saw America as being under judgment because of the nuclear arms race and godless capitalism. He had very little use for what passes for political conservatism in America.

He was a challenge to the Left because every fiber in him was traditionalist in the most radical sense: feudal, Gregorian, patriarchal, popish, gold on the monstrance, hairshirt to the skin.

Brent Bozell came from the Right, I from the Left. Yet we ended up in agreement on All The Disputed Questions. Now that he has passed on to shelter in the Heart of Mercy, I am going to pray for his intercession in matters requiring a miracle. I will report how it works out. I expect something wonderful.

Juli Loesch Wiley
Johnson City, Tennessee
Thanks for posting the link and then copying and pasting the letter here.  That was extremely well written and did very well in conveying a sense of the man.

Now I just need to find back issues of Triumph.
(10-15-2012, 03:58 PM)Jacob Wrote: [ -> ]Thanks for posting the link and then copying and pasting the letter here.  That was extremely well written and did very well in conveying a sense of the man.

Now I just need to find back issues of Triumph.

You might contact the library at Christendom College about back issues of Triumph. Dr. Warren Carroll the founding president of Christendom worked for Triumph, so it is just possible they have them.

c. 
(10-16-2012, 06:37 PM)Cetil Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-15-2012, 03:58 PM)Jacob Wrote: [ -> ]Thanks for posting the link and then copying and pasting the letter here.  That was extremely well written and did very well in conveying a sense of the man.

Now I just need to find back issues of Triumph.

You might contact the library at Christendom College about back issues of Triumph. Dr. Warren Carroll the founding president of Christendom worked for Triumph, so it is just possible they have them.

c. 

Thanks.  I ordered Mr. Bozell's collection of writings as well as the more general 'Best of Triumph' from Christendom Press.  Very fascinating.

GottmitunsAlex, I don't think Econe could claim to have had a monopoly at the time. Smile
[/quote]

Thanks.  I ordered Mr. Bozell's collection of writings as well as the more general 'Best of Triumph' from Christendom Press.  Very fascinating.

GottmitunsAlex, I don't think Econe could claim to have had a monopoly at the time. Smile
[/quote]

Some of use here in the Tank might be interested in some of his wisdom perhaps if it is not troubling could you post some nuggets from time to time?
(10-29-2012, 10:26 AM)Jacob Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-16-2012, 06:37 PM)Cetil Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-15-2012, 03:58 PM)Jacob Wrote: [ -> ]Thanks for posting the link and then copying and pasting the letter here.  That was extremely well written and did very well in conveying a sense of the man.

Now I just need to find back issues of Triumph.

You might contact the library at Christendom College about back issues of Triumph. Dr. Warren Carroll the founding president of Christendom worked for Triumph, so it is just possible they have them.

c. 

Thanks.  I ordered Mr. Bozell's collection of writings as well as the more general 'Best of Triumph' from Christendom Press.  Very fascinating.

GottmitunsAlex, I don't think Econe could claim to have had a monopoly at the time. Smile

You may also find the obituary of his wife interesting. She was a co-founder of Triumph and had a legendary confrontation with a feminist activist who insulted the BVM at Catholic University in 1971:
" in March 1971 she attracted press attention with an attempted physical confrontation with radical feminist Ti-Grace Atkinson at a Catholic University forum.

Before an audience of 800, Atkinson said the Virgin Mary was more "used" than if she had participated in a sexual conception.

"I can't let her say that," Mrs. Bozell yelled, as she ran toward Atkinson and tried to slap her. Her hand struck a microphone.

Afterward, Mrs. Bozell told The Washington Post: "If it comes down to violence for social protest, I do believe in it if there's adequate provocation. I went in there, heard blasphemy and acted."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/con...02272.html

C.

(10-29-2012, 12:03 PM)Don Quixote Wrote: [ -> ]Some of use here in the Tank might be interested in some of his wisdom perhaps if it is not troubling could you post some nuggets from time to time?

I'm only seventy-five pages into the first book, Mustard Seeds.  The best part so far has been the essay from National Review, "Freedom vs. Virtue", where Bozell take down the fusionist idea that virtue/morality can be reconciled with freedom/libertarianism.  I also like very much the essay that takes the form of a fictional conversation between Popes Leo and Paul VI using Leo's Rerum Novarum to critique Paul's 'redistributive' tendencies as set out in Populorum Progressio.  Bozell's conception of what the two would have to say to each other is entertaining and extremely educational as well as quite sad.

Another essay dealing with the growing schism between AmChurch and Rome includes an extended excerpt from a National Catholic News Service article on a liturgical convention held in Kansas City back during the mid-sixties.  The article included a description of one of the sessions the article's author took part in where small groups were formed and did encounter group activities.  The participants came away feeling exhilarated and enthused and all agreed that that particular session was the best at the convention.  The contemporary account of the encounter group gave me a great sense of unease given everything else I've read about how they work and their consequences (the prime example being the well known article at Culture Wars)..

Cetil, I've read about that incident in a few places and also that after it, the feminist woman never spoke in public again. Smile

I saw in my reading tonight that Archbishop Lefebvre was a contributor to Triumph.
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