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Several weeks ago I was privileged to attend a mass in the Dominican Rite at the Dominican House of Studies in Washington D.C.

Aside from the usual customs particular to the Dominican mass, one thing in particular stood out to me. At the "Ecce Agnus Dei" before communion, some of the friars went into the nave and did a full prostration of the style I have only seen in ordinations. It was quite dramatic, they each had an arm extended out towards the altar and their face buried in the ground. Here is a picture (not my own) from the mass.
[Image: DSC00650_zps1f83658c.jpg]

I tried researching it, but I found nothing about this custom. Is it part of the Dominican rite? Has anyone seen anything like this or know the history/ significance of this gesture within the context of mass? I emailed the priest who celebrated the mass with this question, but have not received a response yet.
Good observation.

I've been working on an article about the Sarum Use (the form of the Roman Rite used throughout much of England before the Reformation), which bears many similarities to the Dominican Rite. I noticed that during the Sarum nuptial Mass, the bride and groom are called into the sanctuary for the nuptial blessing, where they make a prostration at the step of the altar as the priest prays over them and four acolytes hold a canopy over them.
(10-15-2012, 02:59 AM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]Good observation.

I've been working on an article about the Sarum Use (the form of the Roman Rite used throughout much of England before the Reformation), which bears many similarities to the Dominican Rite. I noticed that during the Sarum nuptial Mass, the bride and groom are called into the sanctuary for the nuptial blessing, where they make a prostration at the step of the altar as the priest prays over them and four acolytes hold a canopy over them.

Wow, I love it.
(10-15-2012, 02:59 AM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]Good observation.

I've been working on an article about the Sarum Use (the form of the Roman Rite used throughout much of England before the Reformation), which bears many similarities to the Dominican Rite. I noticed that during the Sarum nuptial Mass, the bride and groom are called into the sanctuary for the nuptial blessing, where they make a prostration at the step of the altar as the priest prays over them and four acolytes hold a canopy over them.

That is quite interesting when you consider it in light of the fact that the prostration is usually only during the imposition of Holy orders. Perhaps that rubric in the Sarum nuptial mass is meant to draw a parallel between  the sacraments of Holy orders as confirming ones vocation to religious life, and the sacrament of marriage as confirming the couple's vocation to serve God as husband and wife.


I still have not found anything that says that this sort of prostration during mass is a part of the Dominican rite. However, the Dominican mass in general seems to be more dramatic in its rubrics that the Roman rite. For instance after the consecration, the priest holds his arms straight out to the sides as if Christ crucified. The various servers also did alot of movements that are not a part of the Roman rite, but the purpose of them was not at all obvious. I also noticed that  several extra candles on the altar where lit when the canon of the mass began.
(10-15-2012, 01:43 PM)DoktorDespot Wrote: [ -> ]I still have not found anything that says that this sort of prostration during mass is a part of the Dominican rite. However, the Dominican mass in general seems to be more dramatic in its rubrics that the Roman rite. For instance after the consecration, the priest holds his arms straight out to the sides as if Christ crucified. The various servers also did alot of movements that are not a part of the Roman rite, but the purpose of them was not at all obvious. I also noticed that  several extra candles on the altar where lit when the canon of the mass began.

The priest also extends his arms outward after the consecration in Sarum.

The extra candles might be a variation of the Roman Rite's use of torchbearers during the Canon.
(10-15-2012, 01:49 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]The priest also extends his arms outward after the consecration in Sarum.

The extra candles might be a variation of the Roman Rite's use of torchbearers during the Canon.

Interesting. There were also acolytes with torches though. Here is a picture of it from the mass just because:

[Image: 8035845519_141004c7ba_n.jpg]

Were gestures such as the priest extending his hands out ever a part of the Roman rite and removed for simplicity's sake, or was it something just adopted by the various local uses. I believe the Dominican rite is the same as some 13th century local usage from some diocese in France but I might be mistaken.
(10-15-2012, 01:49 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-15-2012, 01:43 PM)DoktorDespot Wrote: [ -> ]I still have not found anything that says that this sort of prostration during mass is a part of the Dominican rite. However, the Dominican mass in general seems to be more dramatic in its rubrics that the Roman rite. For instance after the consecration, the priest holds his arms straight out to the sides as if Christ crucified. The various servers also did alot of movements that are not a part of the Roman rite, but the purpose of them was not at all obvious. I also noticed that  several extra candles on the altar where lit when the canon of the mass began.

The priest also extends his arms outward after the consecration in Sarum.

The extra candles might be a variation of the Roman Rite's use of torchbearers during the Canon.

Wonder if they picked that up from the Premonstratensian Rite or if it was vice-versa.
(10-15-2012, 01:43 PM)DoktorDespot Wrote: [ -> ]I still have not found anything that says that this sort of prostration during mass is a part of the Dominican rite. However, the Dominican mass in general seems to be more dramatic in its rubrics that the Roman rite. For instance after the consecration, the priest holds his arms straight out to the sides as if Christ crucified. The various servers also did alot of movements that are not a part of the Roman rite, but the purpose of them was not at all obvious. I also noticed that  several extra candles on the altar where lit when the canon of the mass began.

Let me quote from a post I made a year ago.
(08-08-2011, 05:49 PM)Steven Wrote: [ -> ]In the Dominican Use, depending on the rank of the feast, there may be one to three Sanctus candle lighted on each side of the altar.  At a private Mass, there is still only one in the Epistle side.  http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/201...hting.html  Further, an altar server accompanies the priest with a lighted candle when distributing Holy Communion.
Full prostration is pretty cool. I have to say though, that I am glad that it is not required of the lay person. I can think of more then one occasion where I could see myself falling asleep. I don't think that would go over well. :O
(10-15-2012, 06:02 PM)verenaerin Wrote: [ -> ]Full prostration is pretty cool. I have to say though, that I am glad that it is not required of the lay person. I can think of more then one occasion where I could see myself falling asleep. I don't think that would go over well. :O
The lack of prostration has never stopped me!  Standing, sitting, kneeling -- doesn't matter when I'm tired. :LOL:

As for the original topic: at EWTN's televised daily Mass they used to have two (Franciscan) friars prostrate themselves during the Canon, but recently they have ceased doing so -- not sure why.  But, it isn't only a Dominican practice.
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