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Full Version: Is my fascination with classical paganism bad for my Faith?
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Not by itself. I have a pretty hefty interest in serial killers. The psychology is fascinating. As long as those interests don't interfere with the faoth you're fine

Tho make sure they don't

From phone
CS Lewis beautifully described pagan myths as 'gleams of celestial strength and beauty falling on a jungle of filth and imbecility'.

That's not always true. But I think the basic point is that they are reflections of the inner world of fallen man. Definitely worth studying!
I don't think so. What is Catholicism but redeemed paganism? As the Fathers recognized, orthodox Christology requires a retelling of the history of religions that demonstrates both how Christianity is in continuity with, and typically anticipated by, what came before as well as the way in which it turns it all on its head.
Just out of curiosity, by classical paganism do you mean Greece and Rome?

I have a weakness for the Norse myths myself, though I've never felt myself attracted to it as a religion, only as a form of poetry.
(10-24-2012, 10:32 PM)Ancilla Domini Wrote: [ -> ]Just out of curiosity, by classical paganism do you mean Greece and Rome?

I have a weakness for the Norse myths myself, though I've never felt myself attracted to it as a religion, only as a form of poetry.

I mean mythologies in a general sense not exclusively of that of Rome and Greece but rather all the world until God's revelation of him self to man kind in the person of Jesus Christ, in other words everything that came before He. Most importantly and I do make a point, not the religions them selves but rather the people who again in my mind try to attain the idea of God but at those points in history being shut out from the true deity and his revelation, yet at the same time they developed ideas that are not alien or at least that could be understood viewed from the perspective of revealed truth.

What FleetingShadow posted about the CS Lewis quote seems the most correct way to view it.
I never quite understood the fascination some people have for old pagan religions, be them Greek, Norse, Egyptian or Babylonian.

I understand an intellectual interest in classical pagan philosophy from which much useful can be learned but the old pagan religious myths border on the infantile.
(10-24-2012, 11:05 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: [ -> ]I never quite understood the fascination some people have for old pagan religions, be them Greek, Norse, Egyptian or Babylonian.

I understand an intellectual interest in classical pagan philosophy from which much useful can be learned but the old pagan religious myths border on the infantile.

Pagan myths can range in form from simple fables to great epic poetry. Don't you appreciate Homer and Virgil, even with the mythological elements? 
(10-24-2012, 11:47 PM)Ancilla Domini Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-24-2012, 11:05 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: [ -> ]I never quite understood the fascination some people have for old pagan religions, be them Greek, Norse, Egyptian or Babylonian.

I understand an intellectual interest in classical pagan philosophy from which much useful can be learned but the old pagan religious myths border on the infantile.

Pagan myths can range in form from simple fables to great epic poetry. Don't you appreciate Homer and Virgil, even with the mythological elements?   

I can appreciate the literary value of some of these epic pagan stories, the Odyssey for instance, but I can't fathom how one can be fascinated by the religions themselves. I once had an Ancient Egyptian History teacher in college who was all gung ho about Egyptian religious concepts, how the Egyptians "got" nature and so forth. It all struck me as quite bizarre and infantile.
(10-24-2012, 11:05 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: [ -> ]I never quite understood the fascination some people have for old pagan religions, be them Greek, Norse, Egyptian or Babylonian.

I understand an intellectual interest in classical pagan philosophy from which much useful can be learned but the old pagan religious myths border on the infantile.

Some of the greatest classical pagan philosophers held that the pagan religious myths contained a great deal of wisdom. So you're in a somewhat paradoxical situation.
(10-25-2012, 12:25 AM)Graham Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-24-2012, 11:05 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: [ -> ]I never quite understood the fascination some people have for old pagan religions, be them Greek, Norse, Egyptian or Babylonian.

I understand an intellectual interest in classical pagan philosophy from which much useful can be learned but the old pagan religious myths border on the infantile.

Some of the greatest classical pagan philosophers held that the pagan religious myths contained a great deal of wisdom. So you're in a somewhat paradoxical situation.

Am I? Even a child can produce a great deal of wisdom in his touching naïveté. That doesn't make him an adult. Bits of truth and wisdom can be found in the darndest places.
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