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(11-01-2012, 06:44 AM)Poche Wrote: [ -> ]
(11-01-2012, 06:34 AM)Unum Sint Wrote: [ -> ]There is no point in praying for the pig of Hell a certain Martin Luther, but we can pray for the innocent souls that have been and are being fooled by his disgusting heresy against God's Holy Church.

For those that would excuse his actions as being a product of a corrupt system in Germany. I would say this, that whatever good he may have pursued in his theses was buried deep by the excrement that spawned from his mouth, mind and pen as he corrupted the teaching and the very scriptures he had claim to defend to agree with his deluded mind.
You don't know that he is in Hell. History tells us that he was sorry for much what he had. If he made an act of perfect contrition then he could very well b ein Heaven, but if not then we should pray for the repose of his soul.   

True though we do not know that he is in Hell, we do not know if he made an act of perfect contrition either. So, I choose to believe what to my knowledge on the matter tells me, which is that he died in a state of full rebellion against the Church and therefore against God in which his damnation is assured.
(10-31-2012, 11:30 PM)JayneK Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2012, 07:59 PM)Heinrich Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2012, 07:35 PM)Atomagenesis Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2012, 07:15 PM)Heinrich Wrote: [ -> ]To know your rulers discover who you can't(or won't) criticize

This, grammatically, makes no sense to me.

Why not? There's a subject, predicate and an object.

The sentence does not have an explicit subject because the verb is in imperative mood.  Imperatives have an implicit subject "you".  Perhaps this will make it clearer:

[(in order) to know your rulers] (you) discover [who(m) you can't (or won't) criticize.]

purpose clause  ...................  imperative verb ......noun clause as object


Whatever you may have thought, I am the true pedantry champion of FE. Thank you SO much!
I had no intentions of being pedantic about this. Thank you for doing it for our fellow Fish. So quick question Jayne: How is the infinite phrase functioning in said sentence? What is the direct object?
(11-01-2012, 07:03 PM)Heinrich Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2012, 11:30 PM)JayneK Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2012, 07:59 PM)Heinrich Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2012, 07:35 PM)Atomagenesis Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2012, 07:15 PM)Heinrich Wrote: [ -> ]To know your rulers discover who you can't(or won't) criticize

This, grammatically, makes no sense to me.

Why not? There's a subject, predicate and an object.

The sentence does not have an explicit subject because the verb is in imperative mood.  Imperatives have an implicit subject "you".  Perhaps this will make it clearer:

[(in order) to know your rulers] (you) discover [who(m) you can't (or won't) criticize.]

purpose clause  ...................  imperative verb ......noun clause as object


Whatever you may have thought, I am the true pedantry champion of FE. Thank you SO much!
I had no intentions of being pedantic about this. Thank you for doing it for our fellow Fish. So quick question Jayne: How is the infinite phrase functioning in said sentence? What is the direct object?

The phrase "to know your rulers" is modifying the verb, giving the reason for the action, so it is functioning like an adverb. The entire clause "who you can't(or won't) criticize" is the direct object.

It is possible for an infinitive to be subject of a sentence, but it is not in that sentence.  Here is one where it is:

To know your rulers is very important.
(11-01-2012, 07:48 PM)JayneK Wrote: [ -> ]
(11-01-2012, 07:03 PM)Heinrich Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2012, 11:30 PM)JayneK Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2012, 07:59 PM)Heinrich Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2012, 07:35 PM)Atomagenesis Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2012, 07:15 PM)Heinrich Wrote: [ -> ]To know your rulers discover who you can't(or won't) criticize

This, grammatically, makes no sense to me.

Why not? There's a subject, predicate and an object.

The sentence does not have an explicit subject because the verb is in imperative mood.  Imperatives have an implicit subject "you".  Perhaps this will make it clearer:

[(in order) to know your rulers] (you) discover [who(m) you can't (or won't) criticize.]

purpose clause  ...................  imperative verb ......noun clause as object


Whatever you may have thought, I am the true pedantry champion of FE. Thank you SO much!
I had no intentions of being pedantic about this. Thank you for doing it for our fellow Fish. So quick question Jayne: How is the infinite phrase functioning in said sentence? What is the direct object?

The phrase "to know your rulers" is modifying the verb, giving the reason for the action, so it is functioning like an adverb. The entire clause "who you can't(or won't) criticize" is the direct object.

It is possible for an infinitive to be subject of a sentence, but it is not in that sentence.  Here is one where it is:

To know your rulers is very important.

Going beyond grammar, there is a syllogism in there somewhere too:

It is very important to know your rulers.
To know your rulers you (should|must) discover [who(m) you can't (or won't) criticize]
---------------------------------------------------------------
It is very important to discover whom you can't/won't criticize

But I'll leave further analysis to you!
Grammar is awesome. And so is logic. To be better at both makes a man a good thinker and writer.
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