FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums

Full Version: Eucharist: Twice in one day
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2
Hi all,
it is fine to receive the Eucharist twice in one day, correct? Say, at mass in the morning and again at mass in the evening?
The thought occurred to me that I might be wrong about this, and wondered what the official teaching is.
(11-02-2012, 10:29 AM)loggats Wrote: [ -> ]Hi all,
it is fine to receive the Eucharist twice in one day, correct? Say, at mass in the morning and again at mass in the evening?
The thought occurred to me that I might be wrong about this, and wondered what the official teaching is.

That would be possible on All Souls Day, when the priest is allowed to say three Masses, one can receive Holy Communion twice.  But then also, another possibility is when the two Masses you attend in one day are not the "same" Mass (i.e., same Liturgy), say on Saturdays, the morning Mass is not the same Liturgy as the one on the evening (anticipatory Mass for Sunday). 
(11-02-2012, 10:47 AM)Vincentius Wrote: [ -> ]
(11-02-2012, 10:29 AM)loggats Wrote: [ -> ]Hi all,
it is fine to receive the Eucharist twice in one day, correct? Say, at mass in the morning and again at mass in the evening?
The thought occurred to me that I might be wrong about this, and wondered what the official teaching is.

That would be possible on All Souls Day, when the priest is allowed to say three Masses, one can receive Holy Communion twice.  But then also, another possibility is when the two Masses you attend in one day are not the "same" Mass (i.e., same Liturgy), say on Saturdays, the morning Mass is not the same Liturgy as the one on the evening (anticipatory Mass for Sunday). 

I don't think this is correct.

The law is clear: you can receive twice, if the second time is within Mass (eg not a Communion Service, which we should never go to anyway usually). You can receive more than that if it's for danger of death.

It does not matter what kind of liturgy. You can go to the 'same' Mass at a different Church, or same Church, and receive Communion a second time. Though why would you? That's another question. 
(11-02-2012, 10:29 AM)loggats Wrote: [ -> ]Hi all,
it is fine to receive the Eucharist twice in one day, correct? Say, at mass in the morning and again at mass in the evening?
The thought occurred to me that I might be wrong about this, and wondered what the official teaching is.

I was always raised (born in 1951) that typically (there were at times pastoral provisons made in special individual cases, for example receiving Viaticum) one could receive Holy Communion only once per day, regardless of how many Masses they might attend in a day.  Examples I remember from pre VII parochial school were if on went to a daily Mass in the morning and received Holy Communion, and later in the day attended a Nuptial or Requiem Mass they could not receive again.

While I was looking to "source" this recollection I ran across this http://www.ewtn.com/expert/answers/communion_times.htm, so evidently this has changed with the 1983 Code of Canon Law.  Here is another source about the previous and current regulation: http://catholicexchange.com/can-we-recei...stmas-day/
I always thought you were only meant to receive once a day, but was told that is not the case and twice is acceptable - but decided to double check here, after being unable to find any really clear sources online.

The underlying reason is that receiving the Eucharist in the morning and evening would be of tremendous spiritual benefit to me. I'm glad to see that such a practice is indeed sanctioned by the Church. Thanks for the links moneil.
(11-02-2012, 10:52 AM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: [ -> ]It does not matter what kind of liturgy. You can go to the 'same' Mass at a different Church, or same Church, and receive Communion a second time. Though why would you? That's another question. 

I can think of a couple of reasons:  One attends the regular daily Mass at their parish and later in the day they attend a Requiem or Nuptial Mass.  Another probable situation that comes to mind is one attended a morning Mass before work and then during the day a collegue invites them to attend a noon time or after work Mass with them.  I do believe though that occassions of receiving Holy Communion multiple times a day should be rare and evidently has only been permitted since VII.

A similiar situation existed for the clergy before VII.  A priest could only say one Mass on a regular weekday, two Masses on Sunday's and Holy Days, three Masses on All Souls Day and Christmas (there are three Mass propers in the Missal for those two days).  It was not uncommon "back in the day" for Requiem Masses to be held at the regularly scheduled morning Mass, I'm supposing for this very reason, and also to accomodate the Eucharistic fast, which until Pius XII in the 1950's was a fast from midnight.  The local bishop could grant a dispensation, and he did often where I was growing up in the 1950's.  In a small parish with one or at most two priests (if a parish had two priests they would often have two morning Masses, at the normal 7 or 8 am time, and an earlier one at say 5:30 or 6; except the second priest might on certain days have Mass at a convent or hospital chapel).  With a dispensation (which was not general, it was asked for in each circumstance) a priest could still celebrate a regularly scheduled Mass and also accomodate a funeral or wedding Mass later in the day.
(11-02-2012, 11:27 AM)moneil Wrote: [ -> ]
(11-02-2012, 10:52 AM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: [ -> ]It does not matter what kind of liturgy. You can go to the 'same' Mass at a different Church, or same Church, and receive Communion a second time. Though why would you? That's another question. 

I can think of a couple of reasons:  One attends the regular daily Mass at their parish and later in the day they attend a Requiem or Nuptial Mass.  Another probable situation that comes to mind is one attended a morning Mass before work and then during the day a collegue invites them to attend a noon time or after work Mass with them.  I do believe though that occassions of receiving Holy Communion multiple times a day should be rare and evidently has only been permitted since VII.

A similiar situation existed for the clergy before VII.  A priest could only say one Mass on a regular weekday, two Masses on Sunday's and Holy Days, three Masses on All Souls Day and Christmas (there are three Mass propers in the Missal for those two days).  It was not uncommon "back in the day" for Requiem Masses to be held at the regularly scheduled morning Mass, I'm supposing for this very reason, and also to accomodate the Eucharistic fast, which until Pius XII in the 1950's was a fast from midnight.  The local bishop could grant a dispensation, and he did often where I was growing up in the 1950's.  In a small parish with one or at most two priests (if a parish had two priests they would often have two morning Masses, at the normal 7 or 8 am time, and an earlier one at say 5:30 or 6; except the second priest might on certain days have Mass at a convent or hospital chapel).  With a dispensation (which was not general, it was asked for in each circumstance) a priest could still celebrate a regularly scheduled Mass and also accomodate a funeral or wedding Mass later in the day.

Those are good reasons for multiple Masses - I meant to ask why one would receive Communion and more than one Mass though.

In the old days when priests celebrated multiple Masses (Christmas, All Souls', or other exceptional circumstance), I understand that the ablutions were done differently (water only, essentially) so as to not violate the fast for the next Mass.  The full ablution was done as the final Mass of that day for that priest.
(11-02-2012, 11:45 AM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: [ -> ]Those are good reasons for multiple Masses - I meant to ask why one would receive Communion and more than one Mass though.

In the old days when priests celebrated multiple Masses (Christmas, All Souls', or other exceptional circumstance), I understand that the ablutions were done differently (water only, essentially) so as to not violate the fast for the next Mass.  The full ablution was done as the final Mass of that day for that priest.

I agree that in my opinion it should be rare, if at all (though it is not my place to question the spiritual value the OP may find in his or her situation).  I can perceive of very occassional situations were one might prefer to attend their regular daily Mass (especially on First Friday and First Saturday, and especially if special devotions were attached to those partidular local Masses), and later in the day have a funeral or wedding Mass to attend.  The current CCL allows them to receive Communion again, if they so choose.

Your second paragraph is true, and God help the altar server who accidently poured wine at the ablution when the priest wanted only water (speaking from childhood experience  Grin ); it was a 10 am weekday school Mass, we typically poured wine and water at the ablution at these Masses, and had no inclination that the priest was also doing the 11:30 hospital chapel Mass that particular day, as the hospital chaplain was away.  While totally unrelated to the thread this invoked a memory:  Back beore Nixon changed a bunch of holidays to Mondays we, and many, celebrated Memorial Day on the closest Sunday to May 30 (confusion always occuring when the 30th. was on a Wed.).  On the 130 mile trip to the annual family gathering at Holy Cross cemetery in Spokane, WA we stopped at the small farming town of Sprague for Mass, the trip carefully choreographed to observe the 3 hour fast.  This parish had a crotchety old priest who had to be helped up and down steps by the servers and would pull a three leg stool up to the altar rail and sit down to give his sermon (in a larger less rural diocese he probable would have been assigned as a nursing home chaplain long before).  At one Mass at the offertory the server with the cruet of wine was sent back to the sacristy, and returned.  He was sent back again and the second time came back with the whole gallon jug of wine  Grin .  As I recall this exchange I was supposing the priest was uttering words that perhaps should not be uttered at the altar.  I was an altar server myself (though probable very much a neophyte at the time) and it was probable only the presence of the parentals that helped me avoid the temptation of going  Bronx Cheer , though I'm sure I had my fair share of  Blush at the altar myself.
(11-02-2012, 11:27 AM)moneil Wrote: [ -> ]
(11-02-2012, 10:52 AM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: [ -> ]It does not matter what kind of liturgy. You can go to the 'same' Mass at a different Church, or same Church, and receive Communion a second time. Though why would you? That's another question. 

I can think of a couple of reasons:  One attends the regular daily Mass at their parish and later in the day they attend a Requiem or Nuptial Mass.  

That's how my wife and I understood it. We got married on a First Saturday so we went to a First Saturday TLM in the morning, and our nuptial TLM in the afternoon and received Holy Communion both times. Father said it was okay.
(11-02-2012, 01:33 PM)Richard C Wrote: [ -> ]
(11-02-2012, 11:27 AM)moneil Wrote: [ -> ]
(11-02-2012, 10:52 AM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: [ -> ]It does not matter what kind of liturgy. You can go to the 'same' Mass at a different Church, or same Church, and receive Communion a second time. Though why would you? That's another question. 

I can think of a couple of reasons:  One attends the regular daily Mass at their parish and later in the day they attend a Requiem or Nuptial Mass.  

That's how my wife and I understood it. We got married on a First Saturday so we went to a First Saturday TLM in the morning, and our nuptial TLM in the afternoon and received Holy Communion both times. Father said it was okay.

That sounds fine of course: a good reason to receive is that your in the state of grace and it's your nuptial Mass!

But you also could have not received at the first Mass, the reception of Holy Communion on a first Saturday 'counts' even if it's a different liturgy. This is obviously the case when a feast supercedes the usual First Saturday liturgy.

Of course nothing you did is wrong, and I don't want to tell others what to do. I am just one of those people who doesn't receive Communion even every Sunday, even if I'm in the state of grace. I try to receive if I'm (a) in the State of Grace, (b) have fasted (from midnight), © have made appropriate preparation before Mass, (d) have confessed recently, and (e) haven't received in the last few days.

I accept the teaching that daily Communion is beneficial, but I don't think I'm in the state where it would benefit me. I think it would make the Eucharist seem commonplace, whereas rarer reception helps me to deepen my devotion. In the future I may receive more often, but I don't think I'm ready.
Pages: 1 2