FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums

Full Version: For anyone who is not a Priest or Nun...
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
I just thought it would be good to call to everyone's attention that today (according to the Divino Afflatu Rubrics) is the Double Feast of Saint Elizabeth, Widow. Her feast is important because she is one of the few saints on the universal calendar of the Church who became a saint without being a Priest or a Nun. Yes, she did join the third order of St. Francis, but that is not the same as being a fully-professed member of a religious order. She is an example to all of us who are not Priests or Nuns of how to become a Saint without having to follow one of those two other sacred paths. I've heard it mentioned before that there are not enough laymen canonized as Saints, and certainly not enough whose feasts are celebrated by the universal Church or are widely known. But St. Elizabeth is one of those few who we can look on as a model in secular life. To learn how she became a Saint, please read her life as contained in the 4th, 5th, and 6th lessons of Matins today, as presented on http://www.divinumofficium.com/cgi-bin/h...fficium.pl
Make sure on the website to select the Divino Afflatu rubrics and then find those lessons.

God bless you.
(11-19-2012, 08:25 AM)cath4ever Wrote: [ -> ]Her feast is important because she is one of the few saints on the universal calendar of the Church who became a saint without being a Priest or a Nun.

I like Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, but her canonization is not especially remarkable. As I said in another thread about a royal saint, royal saints were relatively common in the Middle Ages. Saint Edward the Confessor is a quick and obvious example. There's also Saint Louis of France, and the very recent example of Blessed Karl, the Emperor of Austria during World War I!

I have always thought it amusing that despite the fact that the backbone of the Church consists of common, married, non-virginal laywomen, the only example of that which comes to mind is Saint Monica, the mother of Augustine of Hippo. Even then, Monica was probably not of peasant stock.
St. Elizabeth of Hungary Parish Church is nearby, and I sometimes drop in for Mass.  It's a Jesuit-run Parish, but quite conservative by any standard.  These are Hungarian-speaking priests.  It has been explained to me that the parish was founded by and for conservative Hungarians fleeing communism.
Thank you, cath4ever!
(11-19-2012, 10:15 AM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]I have always thought it amusing that despite the fact that the backbone of the Church consists of common, married, non-virginal laywomen, the only example of that which comes to mind is Saint Monica, the mother of Augustine of Hippo. Even then, Monica was probably not of peasant stock.

Blessed Maria de la Cabeza
9 September
15 May with Saint Isidore the Farmer

Bl Victoria Strata
12 September

Saint Apphia
22 November

Saint Melania the Younger
31 December

Blessed Zélie Martin
13 July
(11-19-2012, 10:15 AM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [ -> ]
(11-19-2012, 08:25 AM)cath4ever Wrote: [ -> ]Her feast is important because she is one of the few saints on the universal calendar of the Church who became a saint without being a Priest or a Nun.

I like Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, but her canonization is not especially remarkable. As I said in another thread about a royal saint, royal saints were relatively common in the Middle Ages. Saint Edward the Confessor is a quick and obvious example. There's also Saint Louis of France, and the very recent example of Blessed Karl, the Emperor of Austria during World War I!

I have always thought it amusing that despite the fact that the backbone of the Church consists of common, married, non-virginal laywomen, the only example of that which comes to mind is Saint Monica, the mother of Augustine of Hippo. Even then, Monica was probably not of peasant stock.

Blessed Anna Maria Taigi
Blessed Elizabeth
St Frances of Rome (end of life only as religious)
St Rita (good portion of her life as a married women with children)

I recently got this book by +Joan Carroll Cruz+ (RIP) called "Secular Saints," and it includes 250 holy saints who are neither nuns, priests, or monks! She even excluded the secular ones who lived like nuns (like St. Rose), or those with special missions (St. Joan of Arc).

St. Joseph Moscati, a doctor; St. Isidore the Farmer; and Blessed Ralph Milner are just some of them secular saints I got to know in the book. I highly recommend it~~