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Mrs Ggregski took the children to a carol service and told the Anglican Vicar she had 5 children. Eye-roll

He made a snide comment, so I helped her write this letter.  Well actually I wrote it, she just dried her hands, signed it, and got back to scrubbing the floor.  (Just kidding)

I've copied it to the Catholic Parish Priest too.  Doing our bit for ecumenism LOL

Revd Andrew XXXX
XXX
XXX
Kent

December 12th, 2012

Dear Rev. Andrew,

I was very disappointed and upset with your comment, "Some people just don't know when to stop do they?", directed at my friend Kathy, standing right next to me, when I visited All Saints recently for a carol service and mentioned the happy news of my recent fifth child to one your colleagues.

As I mentioned, I am a Catholic, but ignoring that, let's examine your rather rude comment purely from an Anglican Christian perspective.

At the 1958 Lambeth Conference it was stated that "the responsibility for deciding upon the number and frequency of children was laid by God upon the consciences of parents in such ways as are acceptable to husband and wife".

This in no way suggests that a married couple should stop simply because they've had a couple more children than the local vicar.  Moreover, Resolution 15 from the 1930 Lambeth Conference, (before which contraception was roundly condemned by the Anglican Church as "demoralising to character and hostile to national welfare"), stated;

Where there is clearly felt moral obligation to limit or avoid parenthood, the method must be decided on Christian principles...The Conference records its strong condemnation of the use of any methods of conception control from motives of selfishness, luxury, or mere convenience.


I live in a 7 bedroom house, my husband of 14 years has a good job and I don't work but stay at home as a full time mother and my health is very good.  What possible reasons apart from those underpinned by "selfishness, luxury or mere convenience", could I have for not having children according to Christian principles?  What exactly should I "know" that would cause me to decide "when to stop", according to those same Christian principles?

Perhaps you believe the world overpopulated?  The Population Bureau of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the United Nations sees the rate of population growth slowing over the next decades and stabilizing around 9 billion in 2050…and holding there until 2300. This is the same United Nations, which promotes birth control and abortions around the world, so I would assume we can safety trust these numbers.

Thomas Malthus, an Anglican curate with three children like yourself, has been proven wrong time and time again and caused lots of unnecessary human suffering with his fanciful projections. China is headed for a demographic crunch and social dislocation due to its one-child policy which includes forced abortion on mothers who "don't know when to stop".  Europe is dying and having to import youth to keep itself alive.  My own country, Russia, has a negative birthrate, thanks partly to communism and partly to a stance on contraception by the Orthodox Church similar to that of Anglicans.

Regardless of how you feel about the Catholic Church's consistent, and solitary, stance on artificial birth control, it's proven to be pretty prophetic.  Pope Paul VI in Humanae Vitae warned of four results if the widespread use of contraceptives was accepted:

    1. General lowering of moral standards
    2. A rise in infidelity, and illegitimacy
    3. The reduction of women to objects used to satisfy men.
    4. Government coercion in reproductive matters.


That sure sounds like what's been happening for the past 40 years, doesn’t it?



Sincerely yours,


Mrs K Ggregski
(12-12-2012, 12:45 PM)ggreg Wrote: [ -> ]Mrs Ggregski took the children to a carol service and told the Anglican Vicar she had 5 children. Eye-roll

He made a snide comment, so I helped her write this letter.  Well actually I wrote it, she just dried her hands, signed it, and got back to scrubbing the floor.  (Just kidding)

I've copied it to the Catholic Parish Priest too.  Doing our bit for ecumenism LOL

Revd Andrew XXXX
XXX
XXX
Kent

December 12th, 2012

Dear Rev. Andrew,

I was very disappointed and upset with your comment, "Some people just don't know when to stop do they?", directed at my friend Kathy, standing right next to me, when I visited All Saints recently for a carol service and mentioned the happy news of my recent fifth child to one your colleagues.

As I mentioned, I am a Catholic, but ignoring that, let's examine your rather rude comment purely from an Anglican Christian perspective.

At the 1958 Lambeth Conference it was stated that "the responsibility for deciding upon the number and frequency of children was laid by God upon the consciences of parents in such ways as are acceptable to husband and wife".

This in no way suggests that a married couple should stop simply because they've had a couple more children than the local vicar.  Moreover, Resolution 15 from the 1930 Lambeth Conference, (before which contraception was roundly condemned by the Anglican Church as "demoralising to character and hostile to national welfare"), stated;

Where there is clearly felt moral obligation to limit or avoid parenthood, the method must be decided on Christian principles...The Conference records its strong condemnation of the use of any methods of conception control from motives of selfishness, luxury, or mere convenience.


I live in a 7 bedroom house, my husband of 14 years has a good job and I don't work but stay at home as a full time mother and my health is very good.  What possible reasons apart from those underpinned by "selfishness, luxury or mere convenience", could I have for not having children according to Christian principles?  What exactly should I "know" that would cause me to decide "when to stop", according to those same Christian principles?

Perhaps you believe the world overpopulated?  The Population Bureau of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the United Nations sees the rate of population growth slowing over the next decades and stabilizing around 9 billion in 2050…and holding there until 2300. This is the same United Nations, which promotes birth control and abortions around the world, so I would assume we can safety trust these numbers.

Thomas Malthus, an Anglican curate with three children like yourself, has been proven wrong time and time again and caused lots of unnecessary human suffering with his fanciful projections. China is headed for a demographic crunch and social dislocation due to its one-child policy which includes forced abortion on mothers who "don't know when to stop".  Europe is dying and having to import youth to keep itself alive.  My own country, Russia, has a negative birthrate, thanks partly to communism and partly to a stance on contraception by the Orthodox Church similar to that of Anglicans.

Regardless of how you feel about the Catholic Church's consistent, and solitary, stance on artificial birth control, it's proven to be pretty prophetic.  Pope Paul VI in Humanae Vitae warned of four results if the widespread use of contraceptives was accepted:

    1. General lowering of moral standards
    2. A rise in infidelity, and illegitimacy
    3. The reduction of women to objects used to satisfy men.
    4. Government coercion in reproductive matters.


That sure sounds like what's been happening for the past 40 years, doesn’t it?



Sincerely yours,


Mrs K Ggregski

Solid
Well said ggreg, BRAVO !!  Applause Non sum dignus
PERFECT!  LOL

I wish I had the guts to write similar letters to Catholic priests in my area who hold similar attitudes. The priest who was overseeing my "marriage prep" process nearly had a stroke when we told him that I intend to stay home and raise however many children God decides to gift me with.
This is when I wish I could be invisible and be in the vicar's office when he reads this. It would be wonderful to see him fume !

tim
This is what is to be expected when visiting an over decorated meeting hall.

I had a hard enough time bringing myself to attend my first Ordinariate mass, as I thought the Book of Common Prayer was just relabeled to pacify both Prots and Catholics. Upon further research I learned how it was based off of the pre-reformation translation by Myles Coverdale. HOWEVER, I still find it a bit odd that he went and became a Lutheran. I wonder why Mary I didn't behead him. 
Ggreg I thought you response was not only excellent it is in my opinion way to good for the fake priest. You are wasting your pearls on swine my friend, at least in my opinion. Yet I respect and admire that you decided to do it this way.
It is just a letter.  Took me 45 minutes to write and besides the Anglican imposter, I also copied it to the Catholic Canon at the Catholic parish in the same town.  I am sure he knows his Anglican equivalent, so this will give them something to chew on next time they meet at some ecumenical chatfest.  Might make the Catholic priest a little more solid in his understanding too.

Hardly pearls.

With a big family you get no end of this shit about "how many kids you are going to have" and "when you are going to stop?" and it pisses you off after a while. Writing a letter is a good way to let off steam.

Not that 5 is big, my sister has 15.  But it is "big" to 90 percent of modern English twits.
Great!  LOL
Who is Kathy? And why do you sign your wife's name if you wrote it? Did she dictate it to you? Am I missing something?  Huh?
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