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Does anyone have any good quotes on mortification, according to the Saints? I need something to succour me in this lost art.
This is from Fr Tanquerey, who is not a (canonized) Saint.

"Thus it is easily seen that mortification is not an end in itself but a means to an end. We mortify ourselves only to live a higher life; we despoil ourselves of external goods only the better to lay hold of spiritual goods; we renounce self but to possess God; we struggle but to obtain peace; we die to ourselves but to live the life of Christ, the life of God. Hence the end of mortification is union with God". Tanquerey, Adolphe, The Spiritual Life: A Treatise on Ascetical and Mystical Theology, TAN, 2000, P364.

Edit: Quotes, or simply your understanding of the teachings of the Saints. I mean particularly the necessity of mortification contrasted with the goodness of creation.

"Who more free than he who desires nothing upon earth" (The Imitation of Christ somewhere)
"In proportion as thou dost violence to thyself the greater progress wilt thou make" (Same)
"Therefore, he who loves a creature stoops down to its level - nay even lower, since love is not content with equality, but descends to slavery. This is why a soul under subjection to anything apart from God becomes incapable of entering into that pure union with Him and of being assimilated to Him" (St John of the Cross, quoted in Fr Tanquerey, P366)
Mortification is not a lost art.  Most people I know practice mortifications according to their state in life.  Ok, I don't know anybody who scourges themselves, or wears spikes poking into their flesh like St. Rose, but that doesn't mean packing a smaller lunch, or something you don't like as much for school/work isn't any less a mortification (and actually is probably a more appropriate mortification) than doing something severe that may endanger your health, your life, the life of your family, prevent you from doing your job as you are supposed to, and possibly even prevent you from a closer union with God etc.  It's the little mortifications in life.  Attached are a few quotations for you to consider.  I happened upon this in my spiritual reading before bed last night:

From Light and Peace, by Quadrupani.  You can read it online here for free

http://archive.org/details/lightandpeace00quaduoft

It says it's from (was published in?) 1898, but it also says the author died in 1807...so there ya go.

From Chapter IV, Penance

Quote: St. Jerome teaches that when the devil cannot turn a soul away from the love of virtue, he tries to urge it to excessive mortification, in order that it may thus become exhausted and lose the vigor indispensable to its spiritual progress.  Numbers of devout people have fallen into this snare.

And later in the chapter:

Quote: The example of those saints who practised extraordinary penances deserves our sincere admiration, but it is not in these exterior acts that we should try to imitate them; to do this would necessitate being as holy as they were.  Duplicate their miracles also, then, if you can.  "If we had to copy the saints in everything they did," says St. Frances de Chantal, "it would be necessary to spend our life in a horrible cave like St. John Climachus, or on top of a pillar as St. Simon Stylites did, to live several weeks without other nourishment than the Holy Eucharist like St. Catharine of Sienna, or to eat but a single ouce of food each day as St. Aloysius did."  Aspirations to imitate the saints in what is exraordinary are the effect of secret pride and not of genuine virtue.

And a bit later:

Quote: Do not let us confound cause and effect.  It is not because St. Ignatius did these things that he became a saint: on the contrary, it is because he was already a saint that it was possible and permissible for him to do them

In regard to your 2nd quote (from the Imitation of Christ), I take it more to mean submitting one's own inclinations to the will of God, whether it is in literally physical mortifications or simply in submitting to God...killing one's own selfish inclinations and doing the will of God.  Even Christ asked for his cup to pass from him, but ultimately he submitted to the will of the Father.  Even saints had spiritual directors, so make sure that if you do start performing what most people would consider to be extreme mortifications that you talk to your priest.
Mortification is doing everything and anything that I don't want to do, but should. And doing it well. As Titus says, its not a lost art. Why there are so many that I'm tripping over mortifications all day long.
(01-03-2013, 10:27 PM)Jacafamala Wrote: [ -> ]Mortification is doing everything and anything that I don't want to do, but should. And doing it well. As Titus says, its not a lost art. Why there are so many that I'm tripping over mortifications all day long.

Smile

And unfortunately landing flat on my face many times...
(01-03-2013, 10:30 PM)Titus Alba Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-03-2013, 10:27 PM)Jacafamala Wrote: [ -> ]Mortification is doing everything and anything that I don't want to do, but should. And doing it well. As Titus says, its not a lost art. Why there are so many that I'm tripping over mortifications all day long.

Smile

And unfortunately landing flat on my face many times...

Yep, me too.  Smile
(01-03-2013, 10:18 PM)Titus Alba Wrote: [ -> ]Mortification is not a lost art.  Most people I know practice mortifications according to their state in life.  Ok, I don't know anybody who scourges themselves, or wears spikes poking into their flesh like St. Rose, but that doesn't mean packing a smaller lunch, or something you don't like as much for school/work isn't any less a mortification (and actually is probably a more appropriate mortification) than doing something severe that may endanger your health, your life, the life of your family, prevent you from doing your job as you are supposed to, and possibly even prevent you from a closer union with God etc.  It's the little mortifications in life.  Attached are a few quotations for you to consider.  I happened upon this in my spiritual reading before bed last night:

From Light and Peace, by Quadrupani.  You can read it online here for free

http://archive.org/details/lightandpeace00quaduoft

It says it's from (was published in?) 1898, but it also says the author died in 1807...so there ya go.

From Chapter IV, Penance

Quote: St. Jerome teaches that when the devil cannot turn a soul away from the love of virtue, he tries to urge it to excessive mortification, in order that it may thus become exhausted and lose the vigor indispensable to its spiritual progress.  Numbers of devout people have fallen into this snare.

And later in the chapter:

Quote: The example of those saints who practised extraordinary penances deserves our sincere admiration, but it is not in these exterior acts that we should try to imitate them; to do this would necessitate being as holy as they were.  Duplicate their miracles also, then, if you can.  "If we had to copy the saints in everything they did," says St. Frances de Chantal, "it would be necessary to spend our life in a horrible cave like St. John Climachus, or on top of a pillar as St. Simon Stylites did, to live several weeks without other nourishment than the Holy Eucharist like St. Catharine of Sienna, or to eat but a single ouce of food each day as St. Aloysius did."  Aspirations to imitate the saints in what is exraordinary are the effect of secret pride and not of genuine virtue.

And a bit later:

Quote: Do not let us confound cause and effect.  It is not because St. Ignatius did these things that he became a saint: on the contrary, it is because he was already a saint that it was possible and permissible for him to do them

In regard to your 2nd quote (from the Imitation of Christ), I take it more to mean submitting one's own inclinations to the will of God, whether it is in literally physical mortifications or simply in submitting to God...killing one's own selfish inclinations and doing the will of God.  Even Christ asked for his cup to pass from him, but ultimately he submitted to the will of the Father.  Even saints had spiritual directors, so make sure that if you do start performing what most people would consider to be extreme mortifications that you talk to your priest.

These are very useful quotes. Thanks for sharing them!
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(01-02-2013, 02:50 PM)LiberaNosIesu Wrote: [ -> ]Does anyone have any good quotes on mortification, according to the Saints? I need something to succour me in this lost art.
This is from Fr Tanquerey, who is not a (canonized) Saint.

Quotes from the Saints on Mortification

Near about fifty quotes there.

Reading about the duration of Purgatory at the same time might help too.

I wonder what number of those souls who manage to make it to Purgatory have to stay in Purgatory until the end of the world?
From my notes on the Didache, 1st century:

fast for those that persecute you. Did 1:3
νηστεύετε δὲ ὑπὲρ τῶν διωκότων ὑμᾶς

If any man smite thee on the right cheek, turn to him the other cheek also, and thou wilt be perfect. Did 1:4
ἐὰν τίς σοι δῷ ῥάπισμα εἰς τὴν δεξιὰν σιαγόνα, στρέψον αὐτῷ καὶ τὴν ἄλλην, καὶ ἔσῃ τέλειος

For if thou canst bear the whole yoke of the Lord, thou wilt be perfect, but if thou canst not, do what thou canst. Did 6:2
εἰ μὲν γὰρ δύνασαι βαστάσαι ὅλον τὸν ζυγὸν τοῦ κυρίου, τέλειος ἔσῃ· εἰ δ’ οὐ δύνασαι, ὃ δύνῃ, τοῦτο ποίει

be thou long-suffering Did 3:8, DA 3:8
γίνου μακρόθυμος
Esto patiens tui negotii

Receive the accidents that befall to thee as good, knowing that nothing happens without God. Did 3:10, DA 3:10
τὰ συμβαίνοντά σοι ἐνεργήματα ὡς ἀγαθὰ προσδέξῃ, εἰδὼς ὅτι ἄτερ θεοῦ οὐδὲν γίνεται
Quae tibi contraria contingunt, pro bonis excipies, sciens nihil sine deo fieri.

But do you who are slaves be subject to your master, as to God's representative, in reverence and fear. Did 4:11, DA 4:11
ὑμεῖς δὲ οἱ δοῦλοι ὑποταγήσεσθε τοῖς κυρίοις ὑμῶν ὡς τύπτῳ θεοῦ ἐν αἰσχύνῃ καὶ φόβῳ
Vos autem serui subiecti dominis uestris estote tamquam formae dei cum pudore et tremore.
(01-04-2013, 04:31 PM)Scriptorium Wrote: [ -> ]Receive the accidents that befall to thee as good, knowing that nothing happens without God. Did 3:10, DA 3:10

For those looking for a place to start, I think this one is good. Easy to resolve to do, harder to live out. It's a great universal in the lives of the saints.
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