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Why was the offertory dropped in the New Mass? According to the Catholic Encyclopedia the prayer Suscipe sancte pater...was in use by 875. So for over a thousand years there was an explicit offertory where the Priest offered the sacrament for the living and dead for the forgiveness of sins. Why would that have been dropped if not to please the protestants.
A look at the history shows that the adoption of new prayers (at the time) was to fill the gap for the vacant procession. The procession of the gifts was to be restored, so the prayers would then be curtailed back to the form or spirit in which they appeared before the change. The original offertory was just the prayer super oblata, so the sparse text of the offertory should be understood with the idea that the central event is the procession with the chanting of the offertory antiphon and psalm. Also the reform wished to eliminate, or at least lessen, the private prayers, and semi-private prayers of the priest. We TLM goers know that the offertory is silent, and the only thing we hear is the offertory antiphon (not even the psalm). So I think it had nothing to do with Protestant rejection of the idea of oblation and sacrifice, and more with the restoration of the procession and the communal character of the Mass. I would be interested in quotes otherwise, though.

ADD: Also all the sacrificial language was taken out of the offertory because it restored the more ancient notion that the sacrificial character of the Mass didn't begin until the canon. The beginning of this sense was the prayer super oblata (the secret). As the notion of sacrifice got anticipated more and more, according to the reformers in the 60s, the act of offering got muddied. Are we offering unconsecrated bread and wine, or are we offering Jesus who is already present in the matter? It gets a little confusing if you think about it. "Spotless host" and "chalice of salvation"? This anticipation of what they would become was viewed by many in the liturgical movement as inappropriate for the offertory. Obviously there was and is a lot of debate about this.
I would speak of regression and reduction far more than restoration.  The Catholic Encyclopedia's article on the Offertory seems to state that the TLM's offertory prayers were formulated to replace the void created when the procession was dropped.  But it also points out that all of the old super oblata prayers conveyed a clear sacrificial character.  I'm sorry, but the notion of Jewish table prayers as a "restoration" is laughable.
CE, Offertory Wrote:The Oratio super oblata is the Secret. All the old secrets express the offertory idea clearly. They were said silently by the celebrant (hence their name) and so are not introduced by Oremus. This corresponds to the oldest custom mentioned in the "Apost. Const."; its reason is that meanwhile the people sang a psalm (the Offertory chant). In the Middle Ages, as the public presentation of the gifts by the people had disappeared, there seemed to be a void at this moment which was filled by our present Offertory prayers (Thalhofer, op. cit. below, II, 161). For a long time these prayers were considered a private devotion of the priest, like the preparation at the foot of the altar.
Some rites don't even have the offertory in the Mass. It's at the beginning. Some are quite curtailed. Historically the current offertory rite and tone in the TLM is just one of many.

Example:
http://psallitesapienter.blogspot.com/20...rtory.html

And the very short Carthusian rite:

- Offertory antiphon
- De látere Dómini nostri Iesu Christi exívit Sanguis et aqua in remissiónem peccatórum.
- Lavabo
- In spíritu humilitátis
- incense
- Orate fratres
- Super oblata prayer
(01-03-2013, 09:55 AM)Scriptorium Wrote: [ -> ]A look at the history shows that the adoption of new prayers (at the time) was to fill the gap for the vacant procession. The procession of the gifts was to be restored, so the prayers would then be curtailed back to the form or spirit in which they appeared before the change. The original offertory was just the prayer super oblata, so the sparse text of the offertory should be understood with the idea that the central event is the procession with the chanting of the offertory antiphon and psalm. Also the reform wished to eliminate, or at least lessen, the private prayers, and semi-private prayers of the priest. We TLM goers know that the offertory is silent, and the only thing we hear is the offertory antiphon (not even the psalm). So I think it had nothing to do with Protestant rejection of the idea of oblation and sacrifice, and more with the restoration of the procession and the communal character of the Mass. I would be interested in quotes otherwise, though.

ADD: Also all the sacrificial language was taken out of the offertory because it restored the more ancient notion that the sacrificial character of the Mass didn't begin until the canon. The beginning of this sense was the prayer super oblata (the secret). As the notion of sacrifice got anticipated more and more, according to the reformers in the 60s, the act of offering got muddied. Are we offering unconsecrated bread and wine, or are we offering Jesus who is already present in the matter? It gets a little confusing if you think about it. "Spotless host" and "chalice of salvation"? This anticipation of what they would become was viewed by many in the liturgical movement as inappropriate for the offertory. Obviously there was and is a lot of debate about this.
For what it is worth, the Liturgy of Saint John Chrysostom definitely "honors" the to-be-sacrificed bread and wine in a manner similar to the TLM.
(01-03-2013, 01:57 PM)MRose Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-03-2013, 09:55 AM)Scriptorium Wrote: [ -> ]A look at the history shows that the adoption of new prayers (at the time) was to fill the gap for the vacant procession. The procession of the gifts was to be restored, so the prayers would then be curtailed back to the form or spirit in which they appeared before the change. The original offertory was just the prayer super oblata, so the sparse text of the offertory should be understood with the idea that the central event is the procession with the chanting of the offertory antiphon and psalm. Also the reform wished to eliminate, or at least lessen, the private prayers, and semi-private prayers of the priest. We TLM goers know that the offertory is silent, and the only thing we hear is the offertory antiphon (not even the psalm). So I think it had nothing to do with Protestant rejection of the idea of oblation and sacrifice, and more with the restoration of the procession and the communal character of the Mass. I would be interested in quotes otherwise, though.

ADD: Also all the sacrificial language was taken out of the offertory because it restored the more ancient notion that the sacrificial character of the Mass didn't begin until the canon. The beginning of this sense was the prayer super oblata (the secret). As the notion of sacrifice got anticipated more and more, according to the reformers in the 60s, the act of offering got muddied. Are we offering unconsecrated bread and wine, or are we offering Jesus who is already present in the matter? It gets a little confusing if you think about it. "Spotless host" and "chalice of salvation"? This anticipation of what they would become was viewed by many in the liturgical movement as inappropriate for the offertory. Obviously there was and is a lot of debate about this.
For what it is worth, the Liturgy of Saint John Chrysostom definitely "honors" the to-be-sacrificed bread and wine in a manner similar to the TLM.

Very True when one reads part of the Proskomedia (prep before the Liturgy starts):

Deacon: Sacrifice, Master.

The Priest cuts the Lamb cross-wise, taking care not to cut through the seal, and says:

Priest: Sacrificed is the Lamb of God, Who takes away the sin of the world, for the life of the world and its salvation.

...

The Deacon takes the wine and water and says to the Priest:

Deacon: Bless, Master, the holy union.

As the Deacon pours the wine and water into the Chalice, the Priest blesses the diaconal action with the Sign of the Cross +, saying:

Priest: Blessed is the union of Your holy things...

Deacon: ...always, now and ever and unto ages of ages. Amen.

...

Both bow before the Offerings 3 times. The Deacon then takes the censer from the Priest and says:

Deacon: For the precious Gifts now offered, let us pray to the Lord.

Priest: O God, our God, Who sent the heavenly Bread, the food of the whole world, our Lord and God, Jesus Christ, to be our savior, redeemer, and benefactor, blessing and sanctifying us: Bless this Offering, and accept it upon Your heavenly Altar. Remember those who offered it and those for whom it was offered, for You are good and love mankind. Preserve us blameless in the celebration of Your divine Mysteries. For sanctified and glorified is Your most honorable and majestic Name: of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, now and ever and unto ages of ages.

Deacon: Amen.


(01-03-2013, 09:55 AM)Scriptorium Wrote: [ -> ]ADD: Also all the sacrificial language was taken out of the offertory because it restored the more ancient notion that the sacrificial character of the Mass didn't begin until the canon.

Removing anything from the Mass for this reason was explicitly condemned by Pope Pius XII in Mediator Dei. He called it "archeologicalism"
(01-03-2013, 10:52 AM)Scriptorium Wrote: [ -> ]Some rites don't even have the offertory in the Mass. It's at the beginning. Some are quite curtailed. Historically the current offertory rite and tone in the TLM is just one of many.

Example:
http://psallitesapienter.blogspot.com/20...rtory.html

And the very short Carthusian rite:

- Offertory antiphon
- De látere Dómini nostri Iesu Christi exívit Sanguis et aqua in remissiónem peccatórum.
- Lavabo
- In spíritu humilitátis
- incense
- Orate fratres
- Super oblata prayer

Yes and even in the simple Carthusian right we see "remission of sins" not so in the new Mass. I find it hard to believe that throughout the centuries Protestants have hated the idea of the Mass being a sacrifice for the forgiveness of sins and that ArchBishop Hannibal the liturgical Cannibal said specifically that the Mass must change so as not to alienate our "separated brethren" i.e. heretics. It all just seems to convenient to me just sayin...
We shouldn't talk about the growth of the liturgy as if it's somehow the same thing as the destruction of it.

There's a world of difference between the "evolution" of the liturgy in terms of prayers being added over time due to normal or cultural or doctrinal uses, and removing those same prayers.  As Flutchy points out, the "movement" to bring the liturgy back to it's primitive form is a condemned principle.  Obviously there's such a thing as legitimate reform, our beloved TLM is the result of a great liturgical reform.  The NO is the result of protestant influence, that couldn't abide so many mentions of sacrifice. 
Interesting.  Thanks, Flutchman. I wonder if the re...ah...deformers hated Gallic influence.
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