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[Image: carnival_and_lent.jpg]

In the homily today, the priest talked about this picture The Fight Between Carnival and Lent to illustrate his points about Septuagesima.  I am not much of an art person so I had never heard of it before.  It really is an interesting picture
What did the priest say about it and Septuagesima?
There is a struggle between worldliness and self-denial and that is what we are thinking about in this season.
What do you think of the painting?  I think it makes the whole idea of religion look a bit ridiculous.  I don't know about the intention of the artist.  It just looks slightly insulting to me.
(01-27-2013, 09:19 PM)per_passionem_eius Wrote: [ -> ]What do you think of the painting?  I think it makes the whole idea of religion look a bit ridiculous.  I don't know about the intention of the artist.  It just looks slightly insulting to me.

I found a commentary that agrees with you:
Quote:    This painting takes as its subject the traditional annual carnival which was held in Flemish towns and villages in the week before Lent. A half-religious, half-secular festival, it provided an excuse for excesses of eating, drinking and sex; contemporary moralists condemned it as the duivelsweek (devil’s week). Bruegel stresses the opposition between the traditional enemies, Carnival [paganism] and Lent [Christianity], by representing their conflict as a joust. The two adversaries--the obese Carnival, seated astride a barrel and with a spit for a tilting lance, and the thin pinched figure of Lent, seated in a cart and using a baker’s shovel as her weapon--come to blows in the square of a small Flemish town.

    Breugel’s mocking treatment of the figures of both Carnival and Lent has led some writers to see the painting as a satire on contemporary religion an it is certainly true that the humanist circle to which Breugel belonged in Antwerp believed that the conflict between the Protestant (Carnival) and the Catholic (Lent) churches was at the root of the troubled state of northern Europe in Bruegel’s day. However, it probably has a more gneralized meaning, illustrating Bruegel’s belief that human activities are motivated by folly and self-seeking [Roberts].
http://bama.ua.edu/~emartin/food/bruegel/sld020.htm
What was the priest's treatment of the painting?
The reason the painting irritates me is it seems to imply that the Catholic life is one of perpetual moritfication.  That's manifestly absurd.  We're never required to fast or abstain on Sundays, for example.
(01-27-2013, 09:33 PM)per_passionem_eius Wrote: [ -> ]The reason the painting irritates me is it seems to imply that the Catholic life is one of perpetual moritfication.  That's manifestly absurd.  We're never required to fast or abstain on Sundays, for example.

That is a point that came up in the homily.  The priest was talking about a need for balance.
(01-27-2013, 09:38 PM)JayneK Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-27-2013, 09:33 PM)per_passionem_eius Wrote: [ -> ]The reason the painting irritates me is it seems to imply that the Catholic life is one of perpetual moritfication.  That's manifestly absurd.  We're never required to fast or abstain on Sundays, for example.

That is a point that came up in the homily.  The priest was talking about a need for balance.

That sounds very good.
It's too busy.  Like a Where's Waldo pic.
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