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Ascension Thursday on Sunday.  The Resurrection wasn't on Easter; actually, it happened three days later on Wednesday.  Now the Annunciation (March 25)  has been moved to April 8.  The birth of Jesus is now January 8 (nine months later)?  What's the next break of tradition, RCC? 

You're being hysterical:

Quote:Catholice Encyclopedia
The church of Milan, up to our times, assigns the office of this feast to the last Sunday in Advent. On the 25th of March a Mass is sung in honour of the Annunciation. (Ordo Ambrosianus, 1906; Magistretti, Beroldus, 136.) The schismatic Armenians now celebrate this feast on the 7th of April. Since Epiphany for them is the feast of the birth of Christ, the Armenian Church formerly assigned the Annunciation to 5 January, the vigil of Epiphany. This feast was always a holy day of obligation in the Universal Church. As such it was abrogated first for France and the French dependencies, 9 April, 1802; and for the United States, by the Third Council of Baltimore, in 1884. By a decree of the S.R.C., 23 April, 1895, the rank of the feast was raised from a double of the second class to a double of the first class. If this feast falls within Holy Week or Easter Week, its office is transferred to the Monday after the octave of Easter. In some German churches it was the custom to keep its office the Saturday before Palm Sunday if the 25th of March fell in Holy Week. The Greek Church, when the 25th of March occurs on one of the three last days in Holy Week, transfers the Annunciation to Easter Monday; on all other days, even on Easter Sunday, its office is kept together with the office of the day. Although no octaves are permitted in Lent, the Dioceses of Loreto and of the Province of Venice, the Carmelites, Dominicans, Servites, and Redemptorists, celebrate this feast with an octave.
http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01542a.htm
(03-26-2013, 09:08 AM)Vincentius Wrote: [ -> ]Ascension Thursday on Sunday.  The Resurrection wasn't on Easter; actually, it happened three days later on Wednesday.  Now the feast of the Annunciation (March 25)  has been moved to April 8.  The birth of Jesus is now January 8 (nine months later)?  What's the next break of tradition, RCC? 
What are you talking about? The feast was just transferred this year because of Holy Week, since it trumps all. Since the Annunciation is First Class, it was transferred to the first unimpeded day after the Easter Octave. 
(03-26-2013, 09:08 AM)Vincentius Wrote: [ -> ]The Resurrection wasn't on Easter; actually, it happened three days later on Wednesday.

You're talking crazy talk.

http://cdn.hark.com/swfs/player_fb.swf?pid=hqmmqnjzww
Holy Week > Any Feast Day or Solemnity..  I thought most knew that?
I'm pretty sure he's being facetious.
Quote:Ascension Thursday on Sunday.  The Resurrection wasn't on Easter; actually, it happened three days later on Wednesday.  Now the Annunciation (March 25)  has been moved to April 8.  The birth of Jesus is now January 8 (nine months later)?  What's the next break of tradition, RCC?

Serious?  Hyperbole?  Rhetoric?  Deadpan?

Did I just want to see trads jumping from their armchairs, wailing arms, pulling hair, because of an overstatement of a matter requiring some consideration?  Yea and No.  All I know is that on the Sixth month God sent the Archangel Gabriel to a virgin and announce to her that she has been chosen to be the Mother of God.  The Annunciation (Incarnation - God made Flesh) happened according to Tradition and the Holy Scriptures on a certain date, established by the Church on March 25 (by the power of the Keys and the binding and loosing guaranteed to her).  Search the Gregorian Calendar (from the 1500s) for the moveable feast.  Search the saintly reformers (e.g., Sts. Pius V, Pius X, Gregory, et al.).  None. 

Quote:Now, a new proposed plan:  Easter Sunday always falls between the dates March 22nd and April 25th inclusive.  In our current liturgical calendar when March 25th falls on a Lenten Sunday the Annunciation is always moved to the following Monday.  When March 25th falls between Passion (Palm) Sunday and Easter Wednesday inclusive (the latest possible day in the calendar) the Annunciation is always moved to the eighth day after Easter. 
The Solemnity of the Annunciation is NEVER celebrated on a Sunday.
  March 25 fell on Easter Sunday in 1952.

I was not talking about "celebration."  I was talking about observing the ACTUAL date St. Gabriel came and made the announcement.  If the Church wants the celebration done some other day, fine, but don't call it The Annunciation.  The Eastern Church (so did the Western Church before "greater" minds took over) celebrates the Annunciation on March 25 and not insofar as Easter happens to occur this Sunday as well.

Isn't there a revision, adding and substracting from the holy Scriptures that it was 40 days from the Resurrection that Jesus ascended to Heaven, and not 43 days? 

http://www.alcazar.net/2013%20Traditiona...lendar.pdf
Do we know for a fact that Jesus was born on the 25th of December, and do we know for certain that he was in the womb for *exactly* nine months?
(03-26-2013, 11:40 AM)Melchior Wrote: [ -> ]Do we know for a fact that Jesus was born on the 25th of December, and do we know for certain that he was in the womb for *exactly* nine months?

What I've heard is that we only know He was born in the winter.  There might be some clues regarding the dates of the censuses.  But I've also heard that the Church chose December 25th to supplant some pagan holiday at some point.
(03-26-2013, 11:40 AM)Melchior Wrote: [ -> ]Do we know for a fact that Jesus was born on the 25th of December, and do we know for certain that he was in the womb for *exactly* nine months?
With a little bit of detective work, yes.
http://fisheaters.com/customschristmasnotes.html

Quote:note on the date of Christmas, from 30 Days, an Italian Catholic publication:

"December 25 is an historical date," Professor Tommaso Federici, Professor at the Pontifical Urbanian University and a consultant to two Vatican Congregations, has stressed. In an article in the Osservatore Romano on December 24, he wrote: "December 25 is explained as the 'Christianization' of a pagan feast, 'birth of the Sol Invictus'; or as the symmetrical balance, an aesthetic balance between the winter solstice (Dec. 21-22) and the spring equinox (March 23-24). But a discovery of recent years has shed definitive light on the date of the Lord's birth. As long ago as 1958, the Israeli scholar Shemaryahu Talmon published an in-depth study on the calendar of the Qumran sect [Ed. based , in part, on Parchment Number 321 -- 4 Q 321 -- of the Qumran Dead Sea Scrolls, see picture at left], and he reconstructed without the shadow of doubt the order of the sacerdotal rota system for the temple of Jerusalem (1 Paralipomenon/Chronicles 24, 7-18) in New Testament times. Here the family of Abijah, of which Zechariah  (Zachary) was a descendant, father of John the herald and forerunner (Luke 1, 5), was required to officiate twice a year, on the days 8-14 of the third month, and on the days 24-30 of the eighth month. This latter period fell at about the end of September. It is not without reason that the Byzantine calendar celebrated 'John's conception' on September 23 and his birth nine months later, on June 24. The 'six months' after the Annunciation established as a liturgical feast on March 25, comes three months before the forerunner's birth, prelude to the nine months in December: December 25 is a date of history."

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