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I obtained a copy of this infamous book because it of being mentioned by the likes of St. Benedict Center, Fr. Cekada and Bishop Sanborn. My question is, is anyone familiar with this book and where the real "smoking gun" important tidbits are so I can more easliy find them? Thanks!
Sorry, but I don't think too many of us have heard about this book.  I could be wrong, maybe someone could link a summary as it sounds interesting....
I read that book once (I was on a retreat at a Trappist monastery and they had it in the library.) If I recall he talks about the idea of a more communal/ horizontal liturgy along with proposing some of the changes that actually happened. I can not remember much more detail though.
The book was published in 1948 and written by a Jesuit. In it, he lays out what the future of the liturgy will visually look like, as well as the content of words, wide spread use of the vernacular, and the "spaces of worship", ie, the churches. The St. Benedict Center says in one of their lectures on their website, that the book says "There are forces already in place working to accomplish these goals" (I think I quoted this correctly). What he describes in the book is what we see in the NO mass today.


If true, this would prove that the NO Mass is not something that devolved into something that was not intended, but rather, it was planned well beforehand. If memory serves, Archbishop Lefebrve mentions this book as well.


This would be a "smoking gun" for traditionalists. I'm going to look through the book for all the quotes that the St. Benedict center cites. Below is a link to the lecture (go to lecture number 5). It's incredible.


http://www.saintbenedict.com/multimedia/...tures.html


INTRODUCTION

Those years prior to the Council were not without struggle, however. Like most social movements, the liturgical movement (founded in 1909) had its strong opponents and was only authenticated by the encyclical Mystici Corporis (1943) which spoke of the Church as the Mystical Body of Christ, and then four years later by the encyclical Mediator Dei (1947). Mystici Corporis was an important step forward precisely because that doctrine of the Mystical Body of Christ offered the theological underpinnings for the liturgical movement. Membership in the one body of Christ implied social responsibility, and the foundation for Christian service was corporate worship in the Mystical Body of Christ. Mediator Dei was significant in that it was the first encyclical ever to be devoted entirely to the liturgy. And since it affirmed the work of the liturgical movement (albeit with a few cautions) it soon became known as the movement’s "Magna carta." Be that as it may, only by hindsight was the Church able to look back with gratitude to the women and men who spent their lives as liturgical pioneers.

In the late 1940s and into the 1950s, the Holy See began granting a number of liturgical concessions when requested by the various episcopal conferences around the world. In 1949, for example, permission was granted to translate the Roman Missal of Pius V (1570) into Mandarin Chinese while India received permission for a shorter Eucharistic fast. Liturgical experimentation and further localized concessions continued throughout the 1950s which included a shorter form of the breviary, permission to celebrate Mass in the evening, culminating in the promulgation of the revised Holy Week Rites in 1955.

Concomitant with regional requests for revision of liturgical law there was afoot an international network of liturgical contact through the organization of international liturgical congresses. The first was held in the Rhineland at the great Benedictine Abbey of Maria Laach (1951), followed by Odilienberg (1952), Lugano (1954), and especially Assisi (1956) which gathered over 1,400 participants from five continents including over 80 bishops and 6 cardinals. The Assisi Congress was pivotal for what would transpire liturgically at the Second Vatican Council because when the time came to formulate the invitation list for the preparatory commission on the Liturgy, it was precisely the Assisi roster of participants that was consulted.

In many respects the Assisi Congress signified a certain maturing on the part of the liturgical movement. Cardinal Gaetano Cicogani, Prefect of the Congregation of Sacred Rites, presided over that historic assembly, and despite his various attempts to squelch the groundswell for greater liturgical participation and vernacular worship, congress delegates would not diminish their enthusiasm for liturgical change. Every major speaker spoke in favor of the vernacular to thunderous applause by the participants and the disapproval of Cicognani. At the end of the week when the Assisi delegates traveled to Rome for an audience with Pope Pius XII, he reaffirmed Latin as the language of the Church and especially of the Sacred Liturgy. Rumors had been circulating that the Pope would actually announce major vernacular concessions so there was widespread disappointment as delegates left the audience hall. -- Fr. Keith Pecklers, S.J.

WHO PLANNED CHANGES – VATICAN II OR PAPAL COMMISSIONS?

COMMISSION FOR LITURGICAL REFORM – 28TH MAY 1948
Presidents: Cardinal Micara (to 1953) Cicognani
Secretary: Annibale Bugnini
Members: Anselmo Albareda, OSB, Ferdinando Antonelli, OFM,
Augustin Bea, SJ, Carlo Braga, Alfonso Carinici , Cesario D’Amato, OSB,
Enrico Dante, Amato Frutaz, Joseph Low, Luigi Rovigatti
‘The Reform of the Liturgy 1948 – 1975’— A. Bugnini
The Liturgical Press, 1990

LITURGICAL CONGRESSES
1951 Maria Laach
1952 St Odile
1953 Lugano
1954 Louvain
1956 Assisi
1958 Montserrat
1960 Munich

THE STEPS TO THE NEW MASS
1945 - "New" Latin Psalter introduced
1951 - Time of Easter Vigil changed
1956 - Traditional rubrics of Mass, Divine Office, and Holy Week changed
1960 - Traditional rubrics of Mass and Divine Office changed again
1962 - Sacred Apostolic Canon of Mass changed
1964 - Vulgar tongues introduced into Mass
1968 - Dogmatic form of Mass Consecration changed
1969 - Full-blown "New Order" introduced

MAJOR STEPS IN THE REFORM PROCESS
Paschal Vigi l 1 , Dominicae Resurrectionis v igi l iam (1951)
Paschal Vigi l 2 , Instaurata v igi l ia paschal i s , (1952)
Reform of rubrics , Cum nostra (1955)
Holy Week, Maxima redempt ionis (1955)
Reform o f rubrics 2 , Rubricarum instructum, (1962)
Sacrosanctam concilium (1963)
Sacram l iturgicam (Consi l ium founded) (1964)
First Ins truction, Inter Oecumenici (1965)
Second Instruction, T res abh inc anno s, (1967)
The New Mass, Missale Romanum, (1969)

“In the twelve years of its existence (May 28th 1948 to July 8th 1960) the commission held eighty-two meetings and worked
in absolute secrecy. So secret in fact was their work that the publication of the Ordo Sabbati Sancti instaurati at the
beginning of March 1951 caught even the officials of the Sacred Congregation of Rites by surprise. The commission
enjoyed the full confidence of the pope, who was kept abreast of its work by Mgr. Montini and even more, on a weekly
basis, by Father Bea, confessor of Pius XII. Thanks to them, the commission was able to achieve important results even
during periods when the pope’s illness kept everyone else from approaching him.”
A. Bugnini

“A revision of the solemn Mass, little short of revolutionary, was discussed at an international liturgical congress held at
Lugano in September 1953, with the intention of simplifying the rite, removing what is redundant
or superfluous, and giving the faithful a more active part in the liturgy.”
Liturgy of the Roman Church, Archdale A. King, 1957

Men at Work at Worship, Ellard, Longmans, 1940

For pics showing priest ad populorum, go to:

http://www.alcazar.net/liturgical_reform.html
I wonder how many here would have been surprised to know that the N.O.M.evolved, nurtured by the many changes and concessions made by the Holy See since the founding of the Liturgical Movement, and that it was not just hatched out of the minds of modernists intent on destroying the Mass.  I even didn't know that the Canon of the Mass was sacrosanct and it was anathema to tamper with it, and I am referring to the Tridentine Mass, and indeed it was tampered with..  I wasn't seven aware that the Holy See granted the use of the vernacular (Mandarin Chinese) and that the East Indians didn't have to fast from midnight.

That the NOM further evolved into what we actually have today with it's out of control run of abuses was not in the minds of the reformers.  The NOM now is every priest's own "Mass" to say as he pleases with every prohibition broken (ad-libbing, changing words, rubrics and all. 

Weren't the SVs and dyed-in-the-wool traditionalists know anything about this?  Or Is this why they insist in the 1570 Roman Missal of Pope St. Pius V?  Many are pretty much comfortable with the 1962 Missal of Pope John XXIII, especially since much of what was taken out has been brought back.

I don't have the Latin Mass where I live, not even on Sundays.  I have to travel 5 hours, including crossing to another island by ferry, to get to the Latin Mass.  And I can't do it every Sunday.  So I am stuck with the NOM, and as i would like it to be, reverential with good sermons.  But not as some people say "I only attend  reverent NOM, which something that gets rarer and rarer everyday.  At least there no altar boys girls and my complaints are basically Communion in the hand and no minister of he sanctuary ever genuflects.  But I have Sunday obligation to fulfill.
It's an excellent book in that it gives a very clear picture of what was intended by Bouyer, Jungmann and their ilk, despite what some claim to the contrary. It's very much a blueprint, complete with pictures. Montini was very much influenced by both, particularly Jungmann, so much so that he placed him on Concilium.
“In the twelve years of its existence (May 28th 1948 to July 8th 1960) the commission held eighty-two meetings and worked
in absolute secrecy. So secret in fact was their work that the publication of the Ordo Sabbati Sancti instaurati at the
beginning of March 1951 caught even the officials of the Sacred Congregation of Rites by surprise. The commission
enjoyed the full confidence of the pope, who was kept abreast of its work by Mgr. Montini and even more, on a weekly
basis, by Father Bea, confessor of Pius XII. Thanks to them, the commission was able to achieve important results even
during periods when the pope’s illness kept everyone else from approaching him.”
A. Bugnini


Can we trust Bugnini here ? Is he saying Pius XII knew of these plans to change the Mass ?

Also, was John XXIII in the dark on this ? Why would he bother with the 1962 Missal if he knew he Mass was about to be torn apart ?  Was the 1962 Missal a pacifier to keep those opposed to change quiet just a little longer ?
Does anyone have a scan of this? I'd like to read it.
(04-25-2013, 01:25 PM)Whitey Wrote: [ -> ]“In the twelve years of its existence (May 28th 1948 to July 8th 1960) the commission held eighty-two meetings and worked
in absolute secrecy. So secret in fact was their work that the publication of the Ordo Sabbati Sancti instaurati at the
beginning of March 1951 caught even the officials of the Sacred Congregation of Rites by surprise. The commission
enjoyed the full confidence of the pope, who was kept abreast of its work by Mgr. Montini and even more, on a weekly
basis, by Father Bea, confessor of Pius XII. Thanks to them, the commission was able to achieve important results even
during periods when the pope’s illness kept everyone else from approaching him.”
A. Bugnini


Can we trust Bugnini here ? Is he saying Pius XII knew of these plans to change the Mass ?

Also, was John XXIII in the dark on this ? Why would he bother with the 1962 Missal if he knew he Mass was about to be torn apart ?  Was the 1962 Missal a pacifier to keep those opposed to change quiet just a little longer ?

I don't have the book with me, but Bugnini even brags at one point that the commission took advantage of Pius XII's illness to further its work.
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