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http://www.lifesitenews.com/news/columni...priests-de


BOSTON, April 30, 2013 (LifeSiteNews.com) – A Boston columnist has reported that Catholic priests were barred by police from ministering to victims of the Boston Marathon bombing, among them an 8-year-old Catholic boy who died as a result of the blast.


Martin Richard, an 8-year-old Catholic boy who died in the Boston Marathon bombing
In a piece for the Wall Street Journal April 25th, Jennifer Graham said both Rev. John Wykes of the Prudential Center’s St. Francis Chapel and Rev. Tom Carzon, rector of Our Lady of Grace Seminary, among other priests, were denied access to the scene.

The police decision, she says, meant that at least one Catholic may have been prevented from receiving the last rites.

“Martin Richard, the 8-year-old boy who died on Boylston Street, was a Catholic who had received his first Communion just last year,” she writes. “As Martin lay dying, priests were only yards away, beyond the police tape, unable to reach him to administer last rites—a sacrament that, to Catholics, bears enormous significance.”

Father Wykes had served a time as hospital chaplain in Illinois, where he had no problems administering to victims at police scenes. "I was allowed to go anywhere. In Boston, I don't have that access," he said.

"In the Bing Crosby era—in the '40s, '50s, '60s—a priest with a collar could get in anywhere. That's changed. Priests are no longer considered to be emergency responders,” he added.

When the priests realized they could not offer the sacraments to victims, they set up a table to serve water and fruit, and spoke to those who approached.

Graham noted the potential risk of letting priests in, pointing out how easy it is to buy a clerical collar and impersonate a priest, as well as the fact that the decision may have been an “individual’s error” rather than a police force policy.

Yet either way, according to John M. Grondelski, former associate dean of Seton Hall University’s School of Theology, these priests were marginalized and the police force ought to answer for it.

“’Denial of access to clergy’—especially at the hour of our death—is no trifling thing,” he wrote Tuesday in First Things. “Have we now decided that clergy are not first responders, that only physical life is worth saving, that spiritual life is a private affair that has no relevance in the midst of a terrorist attack?”

The incident, he said, “de facto marginalized clergy, relegating their ministry to the sidelines as unessential to the ‘real’ assistance that the state’s authorities thought it had a monopoly on.”

“The message is clear: Disasters are Caesar’s turf, not God’s,” he adds.

Commenting at CatholicCulture.org, Catholic journalist Phil Lawler says the incident is reminiscent of a Boston slogan from decades past: ”Catholics need not apply.”

“Doctors and nurses were welcome at the bombing scene. Firefighters and police officers were welcome. But Catholic priests, who might have offered the solace of the sacraments, were not,” he writes.

Lawler found it significant that the priests ended up ministering by offering water and fruit. “Doesn’t that nicely capture what a once-Catholic, now-secular culture expects from the Church?” he writes. “It’s not essential for priests to administer the sacraments; in fact it’s unwelcome. But if they could just stay out of the way, and give people something to eat, that would be fine.”
Pray
From the perspective of security, any yahoo can put on a collar and gain access to a scene he has no business being on.

That being said, the only alternative is a government ID program for priests.

Kinky the way the world now works, eh?
(04-30-2013, 06:53 PM)jonbhorton Wrote: [ -> ]From the perspective of security, any yahoo can put on a collar and gain access to a scene he has no business being on.

That being said, the only alternative is a government ID program for priests.

Kinky the way the world now works, eh?

If someone was motivated to so so, anyone could pretend to be a EMT, Nurse, Doctor, Firefighter, or Police Officer as well.  It would take a small amount of planning, but if their goal is the set off a secondary bomb to target first responders, they could do so easily.  There are so many jurisdictions and agencies in one place that there is no way to know everyone going in and out.

I understand the logic, but the reality is that its easy to impersonate someone if you are the least bit motivated. 
Disgusting.

Anyone can impersonate anyone, but that doesn't mean the world grinds to a halt and common sense dies. Ridiculous. A man dressed as a priest is going to be a priest. There was no sense of paranoia about this decades ago.

(04-30-2013, 07:06 PM)Sant Anselmo Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-30-2013, 06:53 PM)jonbhorton Wrote: [ -> ]From the perspective of security, any yahoo can put on a collar and gain access to a scene he has no business being on.

That being said, the only alternative is a government ID program for priests.

Kinky the way the world now works, eh?

If someone was motivated to so so, anyone could pretend to be a EMT, Nurse, Doctor, Firefighter, or Police Officer as well.  It would take a small amount of planning, but if their goal is the set off a secondary bomb to target first responders, they could do so easily.  There are so many jurisdictions and agencies in one place that there is no way to know everyone going in and out.

I understand the logic, but the reality is that its easy to impersonate someone if you are the least bit motivated. 

I agree, but the mentality is not one of common sense but illogical fear mongering. We're talking about the government. The mentality is essentially that such things, like last rites, are not necessary. The excuse given is something like "getting in the way" or "could be anyone". The world thinks materialistically, as the world is tending towards Marxism, which is materialistic. The nation is materialistic, thinking not of God but other things and reasons. At best, we have entered into a gnostic mentality akin to new paganism. At worst, we left that a while ago and now are full on the road to totally discounting priests and Religion. We already do, as a country, anyway, so its application in other areas of more importance to those who have not done this is especially vulgar-- such as last rites.


Procedure, via lawyers, is killing the world's common sense brain portion. Procedure is meant to be a guide, not the rule which shan't be broken. Procedure says no credentials = no access.
(04-30-2013, 07:15 PM)SaintRafael Wrote: [ -> ]Disgusting.

Anyone can impersonate anyone, but that doesn't mean the world grinds to a halt and common sense dies. Ridiculous. A man dressed as a priest is going to be a priest. There was no sense of paranoia about this decades ago.

Agreed, generally. But even the cops have indicated that anyone doubting a cop to be a cop should call 911 to verify. This is the way the world works. We can stamp our feet or recognize it as what it is. Once recognizing it, we then either demand a resolution to the problem, which will be mucked up anyway and totally tend towards evil since the gov will handle it, or we just realize the nation is totally screwed.

I think it is all ridiculous. Let the priest do his job. If he's a phony, I should think that it would be fairly easy for anyone to spot. Then give him the boot.
(04-30-2013, 06:53 PM)jonbhorton Wrote: [ -> ]From the perspective of security, any yahoo can put on a collar and gain access to a scene he has no business being on.

It's not that far-fetched.  al Qaeda actually planned to do that in the mid-90's when John Paul II was visiting Manila for world youth day.  They probably would've succeeded if those yahoos didn't set their apartment on fire when building the bombs.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bojinka_plo...ation_plot

Yeah the cop at the Marathon overreacted and made a mistake but that hardly means there's some kind of pervasive anti-Catholic conspiracy here.
My first reaction would have been to give conditional general absolution... not set up a fruit and water stand. Sorry if that sounds harsh. But really, passing out fruit and water?
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