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http://www.romereports.com/palio/russian...bD25JxvBS4

(video included on the link above)

June 5, 2013. (Romereports.com) This year, Pope Francis led his first procession through Rome. A few days later, history was being made thousands of miles away, in the streets of St. Petersburg, Russia.

For the first time in 95 years, the Russian faithful were allowed to celebrate the religious feast of Corpus Christi by taking the blessed Host on a three kilometer journey between the Catholic churches of Our Lady of Lourdes and St. Catherine of Alexandria.


The last Corpus Christi procession had taken place back in 1918. Since then, political and social upheaval forbade all religious festivals and rituals, ending a centuries long tradition common to both the Eastern and the Western Churches.

The faithful were only allowed to gather processions within their churches, but were strictly prevented from taking them to the streets. 

The historic event, which took place on June 2nd, was attended by many, including members of religious orders, fraternities and numerous children, all escorted through the city by the police.

Astonishing!  "In the end, My Immaculate Heart will triumph" -- Our Lady of Fatima, 1917

(06-06-2013, 04:56 PM)GGG Wrote: [ -> ]http://www.romereports.com/palio/russian...bD25JxvBS4

(video included on the link above)

June 5, 2013. (Romereports.com) This year, Pope Francis led his first procession through Rome. A few days later, history was being made thousands of miles away, in the streets of St. Petersburg, Russia.

For the first time in 95 years, the Russian faithful were allowed to celebrate the religious feast of Corpus Christi by taking the blessed Host on a three kilometer journey between the Catholic churches of Our Lady of Lourdes and St. Catherine of Alexandria.


The last Corpus Christi procession had taken place back in 1918. Since then, political and social upheaval forbade all religious festivals and rituals, ending a centuries long tradition common to both the Eastern and the Western Churches.

The faithful were only allowed to gather processions within their churches, but were strictly prevented from taking them to the streets. 

The historic event, which took place on June 2nd, was attended by many, including members of religious orders, fraternities and numerous children, all escorted through the city by the police.

Awesome! 
I understand this to be a fruit of the restoration. We must continue to pray, sacrifice, do works of penance, and be an example, to continue on this work of conversion, restoration, and fulfillment.
(06-06-2013, 04:56 PM)GGG Wrote: [ -> ]The last Corpus Christi procession had taken place back in 1918. Since then, political and social upheaval forbade all religious festivals and rituals, ending a centuries long tradition common to both the Eastern and the Western Churches.
This is a really confusing sentence. One could interpret this as Corpus Christi being an Eastern tradition.
(06-07-2013, 03:27 PM)Adelbrecht Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-06-2013, 04:56 PM)GGG Wrote: [ -> ]The last Corpus Christi procession had taken place back in 1918. Since then, political and social upheaval forbade all religious festivals and rituals, ending a centuries long tradition common to both the Eastern and the Western Churches.
This is a really confusing sentence. One could interpret this as Corpus Christi being an Eastern tradition.

Exactly.  This likely took place at a Polish or Lithuanian expat church.  There are few, if any, Roman-rite Russians.
(06-07-2013, 05:17 PM)Melkite Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-07-2013, 03:27 PM)Adelbrecht Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-06-2013, 04:56 PM)GGG Wrote: [ -> ]The last Corpus Christi procession had taken place back in 1918. Since then, political and social upheaval forbade all religious festivals and rituals, ending a centuries long tradition common to both the Eastern and the Western Churches.
This is a really confusing sentence. One could interpret this as Corpus Christi being an Eastern tradition.

Exactly.  This likely took place at a Polish or Lithuanian expat church.  There are few, if any, Roman-rite Russians.

Well, it's complicated when those ex-pats are third-fourth-fifth generation and speak Russian at home.  It seems the service was in Russian.
(06-07-2013, 05:17 PM)Melkite Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-07-2013, 03:27 PM)Adelbrecht Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-06-2013, 04:56 PM)GGG Wrote: [ -> ]The last Corpus Christi procession had taken place back in 1918. Since then, political and social upheaval forbade all religious festivals and rituals, ending a centuries long tradition common to both the Eastern and the Western Churches.
This is a really confusing sentence. One could interpret this as Corpus Christi being an Eastern tradition.

Exactly.  This likely took place at a Polish or Lithuanian expat church.  There are few, if any, Roman-rite Russians.

"For the first time in 95 years, the Russian faithful were allowed to celebrate the religious feast of Corpus Christi by taking the blessed Host on a three kilometer journey between the Catholic churches of Our Lady of Lourdes and St. Catherine of Alexandria

. ???
(06-08-2013, 04:47 AM)Whitey Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-07-2013, 05:17 PM)Melkite Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-07-2013, 03:27 PM)Adelbrecht Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-06-2013, 04:56 PM)GGG Wrote: [ -> ]The last Corpus Christi procession had taken place back in 1918. Since then, political and social upheaval forbade all religious festivals and rituals, ending a centuries long tradition common to both the Eastern and the Western Churches.
This is a really confusing sentence. One could interpret this as Corpus Christi being an Eastern tradition.

Exactly.  This likely took place at a Polish or Lithuanian expat church.  There are few, if any, Roman-rite Russians.

"For the first time in 95 years, the Russian faithful were allowed to celebrate the religious feast of Corpus Christi by taking the blessed Host on a three kilometer journey between the Catholic churches of Our Lady of Lourdes and St. Catherine of Alexandria

. ???

No, Melkite is right.  Odds are that those were churches built for Poles, Lithuanians, Hungarians etc. living in the Imperial city.  They were all Russian subjects at the time.  Also, probably diplomats.  He is correct that they weren't built for ethnic Russians, and the people who go there now are probably immigrants and their descendants.  As an American, I say if they live in Russia and speak Russian...eh, they are Russian.  But Russia is a more traditional place than that.
(06-08-2013, 01:38 PM)Parmandur Wrote: [ -> ]As an American, I say if they live in Russia and speak Russian...eh, they are Russian.  But Russia is a more traditional place than that.

That is one way of looking at it.  I don't doubt most of them were Russian citizens, but just as third-fourth-fifth generation Italians, Greeks, Ukrainians, etc., haven't abandoned their cultural heritage when coming to America, it's likely these descendants have not fully assimilated into Russian culture either.  When I was in Moscow, I attended the main Latin Catholic parish a few times before I came home.  20 masses every Sunday, in English, French, Spanish, Polish, Lithuanian, Vietnamese, and those having two or three masses each.  The Russian-language mass was held on Sunday evenings.  If the main parish in the capital is clearly an ex-pat church, it suggests similar for the parish in St. Petes.