FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums

Full Version: Everything right about traditionalists in > 6.00 minutes
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Stereotypically ugly altar gets FSSP makover:

Everything right about these Catholics is presented. It all begins with a love of the Eucharist.
The beginning was so beautiful but then they made it ugly  :'((

That is not Apostolic tradition that is Medieval triumphalism. I bet those priests were those SSPX kinds!!!
Cardinal Ratzinger ripped the opponents of medieval piety/liturgy a new one in his ]i]Spirit of the Liturgy[/i]; mentioned how those who think medieval developments were exaggerations or errors need to have their heads examined (so to speak).  :P
Felix needs special tags for his posts like this: [sarcasm][/sarcasm]
Read like that, he's hysterical.

Since my parish is renting from another parish, the altar gets a similar transformation every week. Pretty amazing!

Philosoraptor, I love your avatar.  :grin:
Extreme Makeover: Catholic Edition.

Watch as priests convert a stodgy old church altar into something spiritual and relevant for today's modern times!
Wait, how is the priest going to celebrate Mass versus populum? No one will be able to see him behind all of that pious stuff. Just kidding, this is truly amazing!
I am sorry but I am not really impressed. I fail to see why they could have not just used the altar as it was (with the antependium and candles on the altar of course.) I think the addition of the gradines is completely unnecessary and I think it is inappropriate to place them on top of a consecrated altar.

It is important to remember that the freestanding altar (similar in appearance to the one in the video) is the original and rubrically correct form. In fact until the 1500s, nearly every altar was built freestanding without any gradines or rederos. The idea that something becomes "traditional" (and therefore better) if we make it look like one of the rubrically incorrect altars of the 1700 and 1800s is one we need to move beyond.

(06-08-2013, 11:11 PM)DoktorDespot Wrote: [ -> ]I am sorry but I am not really impressed. I fail to see why they could have not just used the altar as it was (with the antependium and candles on the altar of course.) I think the addition of the gradines is completely unnecessary and I think it is inappropriate to place them on top of a consecrated altar.

It is important to remember that the freestanding altar (similar in appearance to the one in the video) is the original and rubrically correct form. In fact until the 1500s, nearly every altar was built freestanding without any gradines or rederos. The idea that something becomes "traditional" (and therefore better) if we make it look like one of the rubrically incorrect altars of the 1700 and 1800s is one we need to move beyond.
This!
Just to note, I once heard it said that canonically/rubrically there was to be a space behind the wall that the altar is placed against.
(06-08-2013, 11:35 PM)GodFirst Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-08-2013, 11:11 PM)DoktorDespot Wrote: [ -> ]I am sorry but I am not really impressed. I fail to see why they could have not just used the altar as it was (with the antependium and candles on the altar of course.) I think the addition of the gradines is completely unnecessary and I think it is inappropriate to place them on top of a consecrated altar.

It is important to remember that the freestanding altar (similar in appearance to the one in the video) is the original and rubrically correct form. In fact until the 1500s, nearly every altar was built freestanding without any gradines or rederos. The idea that something becomes "traditional" (and therefore better) if we make it look like one of the rubrically incorrect altars of the 1700 and 1800s is one we need to move beyond.
This!
Just to note, I once heard it said that canonically/rubrically there was to be a space behind the wall that the altar is placed against.

Very true - it is considered essential to be able to pass entirely around the altar during the consecration of the Church (this is why even in churches where the altar is against the wall there should be a passage behind to allow for this.) The ideal form of incensing during the offertory also calls for a freestanding altar.

For instance - this is an original 13th century Italian altar in its original position. (albeit with a regrettable frontal and candle arrangement)

[Image: 800px-Pieve_di_brancoli,_altare.JPG]

Of course, the altar should always be fully covered with an antependium, but there should be no reason to object to the freestanding form. Just look at the Eastern rites or the Orthodox. They also celebrate their liturgy Ad Orientem, but always at a freestanding altar.

(06-08-2013, 01:44 PM)Felix E Wrote: [ -> ]The beginning was so beautiful but then they made it ugly  :'((

That is not Apostolic tradition that is Medieval triumphalism. I bet those priests were those SSPX kinds!!!

I know you're only kidding with this comment, but if I remember right, some in video's comment section, essentially says this in all seriousness.  :LOL: