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The argument against the doctrine of Indifferentism (Protestant) that God is good and everybody, no matter what, will be save who merely accepts Jesus as a personal Savior.

Eighth Sunday After Pentecost
The Reason For The Last Judgment

Give an account of thy stewardship.” St. Luke 16: 2.

Is it not an article of faith that every man shall be judged immediately after death, and sent into eternal glory or eternal torments?  Why, then, should men appear again to hear another sentence? Is not the first one good and just enough, as it is pronounced by an infallible Judge?

Not a doubt of it!  What is, then, the object of a new examination and judgment?  Will the last judgment perhaps make some change in the first?  Not at all; the sentence once uttered shall not be recalled.  On the last day each one shall hear the same sentence that was pronounced on him at the particular judgment on the last day of his life, at the moment of death, and no other. If I am then condemned to hell, I shall certainly hear in the last judgment the words: “Depart, accursed!” If I am then admitted to the kingdom of heaven, I shall certainly hear on the last day the words: “Come, ye blessed!” What is then the use of a general judgment. Several reasons are assigned for it, from which I shall select two principal ones, the first of which concerns God, and the second us mortals. The first I shall speak of today

I. There must necessarily be a general judgment that God may publicly, in the sight of the whole world, make good His lessened honor.

II. There must necessarily be a general judgment, that God may publicly, in the sight of the whole world, justify His now incomprehensible providence.

I. Why do most men give God so little of the honor due to Him, and are so backward in fearing and loving Him? Because they have but a dark knowledge of His majesty. We do not know what a great Lord He is, and how worthy of honor, fear and love. It is true, God is the absolute Lord and Master of all time, of every moment of our lives. But we often refuse to act on this truth; we show by our conduct that we believe quite the contrary, for we misspend our precious time given us by God in a most foolish manner, wasting it in idleness, vanity, gluttony, the lusts of the flesh, and useless amusements.

God is almighty, and present in all places; at any moment He has the power of reducing us to nothing, if such is His will. We often refuse to act on that knowledge; otherwise should we, poor, despicable creatures as we are, so often rebel against Him, offend Him so audaciously, and before His very eyes trample His law under foot?

God is the sworn Enemy and Chastiser of sin, and His infinite justice will not allow the least transgression to go unpunished, unless it has been fully atoned for. We often refuse to act on that knowledge; otherwise should we dare to offend Him so presumptuously?

Do we not falsely imagine that we are free from all punishment when we spend whole weeks, months and years in sin, calmly and quietly, as if there were no one in heaven or on earth from whom we have anything to fear? We separate the divine mercy and justice from each other, and imagine that justice must always give way before and yield to mercy; we look on justice as an idle attribute of God, that never upholds its rights and leave everything to mercy.

God is good, we say; God is patient; He is ready to forgive, and therefore it makes little matter how one lives. Thus, through want of a proper knowledge of God, His honor is often lessened and despised. Hence there must come a time in which God will avenge His honor, and publicly show before the world what He is.

And that will be the last day of general judgment, which is therefore called in Holy Writ “the day of the Lord.” Then shall all see how bitter is the hatred God has against sin and the sinner, and how He will not allow the smallest transgression to go unpunished; for He will demand an account even of an idle word or thought; nay, He will judge the justices and holiest works of men, and put them to the proof to see if they are according to His will and pleasure. All shall then see that God has no respect for persons; rich and poor, noble and lowly, prince and peasant, master and servant, mistress and maid; great and small shall be cited before Him in the same order, without distinction of rank, and each one shall receive the reward or punishment due to his works. Therefore, the prophet Isaias calls this day cruel: “Behold, the day of the Lord shall come, a cruel day, and full of indignation, and of wrath, and fury, to lay the land desolate, and to destroy the sinners thereof out of it” (Is. 13: 9).

Continue to: http://www.alcazar.net/8thSundayAfterPen...ermon.html
(07-13-2013, 11:51 AM)Vincentius Wrote: [ -> ]The argument against the doctrine of Indifferentism (Protestant) that God is good and everybody, no matter what, will be save who merely accepts Jesus as a personal Savior.

Eighth Sunday After Pentecost
The Reason For The Last Judgment

Give an account of thy stewardship.” St. Luke 16: 2.

Is it not an article of faith that every man shall be judged immediately after death, and sent into eternal glory or eternal torments?

The answer to the question above is no.  That's a Protestant concept.  What happened to purgatory?
(07-13-2013, 07:41 PM)DJR Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-13-2013, 11:51 AM)Vincentius Wrote: [ -> ]The argument against the doctrine of Indifferentism (Protestant) that God is good and everybody, no matter what, will be save who merely accepts Jesus as a personal Savior.

Eighth Sunday After Pentecost
The Reason For The Last Judgment

Give an account of thy stewardship.” St. Luke 16: 2.

Is it not an article of faith that every man shall be judged immediately after death, and sent into eternal glory or eternal torments?

The answer to the question above is no.  That's a Protestant concept.  What happened to purgatory?

Are you denying that a soul is not judged immediately after death and has been consigned to go to heaven, hell or purgatory?  If you are, then better review what are the articles of faith that must be believed on pain of sin.  Purgatory is for those who die in the state of grace but stil have to "pay" for the punishment due to already forgiven sin.  The Protestant notion or "doctrine" denies or rejects Purgatory.  As the homilist explains "why the need for a general Judgment when Judgment was already rendered at the Particulary Judgment (at the moment of death).  At this General Judgment, Purgartory is abolished and there will be Heaven and Hell only.  At this specific time,there will be a gathering of every human ever created, and here therre will be the separation of the sheep and the goats -- EVERYBODY will know where everybody was destined to go and -- WHY.  This is God's way of showing His Justice: the certain person was sent to Hell because he did a terrible thing, most abominable to God, and also everybody will know that a certain somebody is in Heaven because he has done God's holy Will and abided by His commandments.  Please read the whole sermon.