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Is the RSV Catholic Edition a good Bible?  Is it more like a clearer version of the Douay?  I would like to know what you think of it.
I'd stay with the Douay Rheims, personally. From wikipedia, a bit on the RSVCE:
"The RSV-CE was based on the 1962 printing of the Protestant RSV (see Revised Standard Version#Later editions). The editors of the Catholic Edition made no changes to the Old Testament text; all they did was include the seven Deuterocanonical works in their traditional Catholic order. At the end of each testament, an appendix of explanatory and interpretive notes was added. In the Psalms, they preserved the numbering of the Protestant edition (which reflects the Hebrew system), but they placed in brackets the Catholic system of numbering, which is based upon the Greek Septuagint and the Latin Vulgate. However, some minor changes were made to the New Testament in places that had variant readings more in line with Catholic understanding and tradition. Some of the more important changes were the use of the phrase "full of grace" in the angel's greeting to Mary in Luke 1:28, the restoration of the story of the woman caught in adultery (John 7:53-8:11) and the inclusion of the longer ending to the Gospel according to Mark (16.9-20). Other verses or phrases with questionable authenticity that had been footnoted in the Protestant edition were restored in the Catholic Edition (Luke 22.19-20; 24. 5, 12, 36, 40, 51-52) In other places, some word changes were made, and some texts were exchanged with footnotes. Furthermore, the footnotes regarding the value of New Testament coins were rewritten in terms of how long it took the average worker to earn the money (the denarius was no longer defined as twenty cents but as a day's wage). The book of Revelation, called "The Revelation To John", had added as a subtitle ("The Apocalypse") The differences between the 1962 Protestant RSV New Testament and the Catholic Edition New Testament were listed in an appendix to the RSV-CE. This appendix, however, is partially outdated, as some of the changes were introduced into the Protestant Second Edition of the RSV New Testament in 1971 in preparation for the issuance of the RSV Common Bible."

More here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Revised_Sta...ic_Edition
I will second the vote for the Douay. As a matter of fact, the DR "Pocket Size" edition from Baronius Press is my constant companion.

http://www.baroniuspress.com/book.php?wid=56&bid=7#tab=tab-1

I also have the RSV-CE and the RSV-CE Second Edition, both by Ignatius Press. I have been sorely disappointed with both of them. The problems with the RSV have all been pointed out above, but lets just put this simply: The Douay Rheims is the product of the long effort of geniune Catholic scholarship. The RSV is not. Choose accordingly.
In my opinion the perfect combination is the D-R and the Knox (Baronius Press for both). The wording of the two texts and the footnotes in each version complement each other very nicely.
(08-08-2013, 08:01 AM)Ineffable1 Wrote: [ -> ]In my opinion the perfect combination is the D-R and the Knox (Baronius Press for both). The wording of the two texts and the footnotes in each version complement each other very nicely.

The Confraternity Version is good, too.  I have a combination Confraternity/Douai Bible.  I also have a Knox, which was our family Bible growing up, but I prefer the Confraternity.
I use them both. They are my preferred translations. It's a good practice to have more than one translation when studying scripture.
(07-28-2013, 06:36 PM)a83192 Wrote: [ -> ]Is the RSV Catholic Edition a good Bible?  Is it more like a clearer version of the Douay?  I would like to know what you think of it.

Douay is better, and I personally use it alone. However, I would like to find a translation of the Septuagint, which is probably even more accurate than the Vulgate.
I'd go with the Confraternity St. Joseph study Bible. I keep the D/R as a reference, it's an attempt to be literal, and is tough to read for meaning. I use the Stuttgart Vulgata for more depth. 


tim
If you can afford it, I would recommend the Knox translation (recently published by Baronius Press), the RSV-CE and the Douay-Rheims.  I have all three.  I use the Knox for my regular reading.  It's simply gorgeous in the way the English flows; the beauty brings out the meaning.  The Douay-Rheims is important to have because it is traditional; ideally, you would use the Haydock version of the Douay-Rheims for the notes, but they are online.  The RSV-CE is a very clear and literal translation, so it can be good to use against the Knox if you want to delve more deeply into the meaning of the text.
I think the RSV-CE is literate not literal, which is why it can be read easily. The D/R is literal trying to be exact translation making idiomatic phrases hard to understand.
Wouldn't you agree Clare Brigid.

tim
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